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Thread: Hand vs Machine Applique

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sandra-P's Avatar
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    Hand vs Machine Applique

    What a mess I have made. I have tried to cut out the shapes for this BOM quilt I am doing. I would love to do hand applique however I am having a really hard time trying to turn under the seams. Forget needle turn, I just cant do it. So I used every other method, from templates made of heat resistant mylar, to freezer paper, to going on You Tube to try to find help. Looked up Hawaiian applique as I thought it looked close to what I need to do for this quilt. I love the look of the quilt, however I need advice. Should I just give up and do machine applique or does anyone out there have any suggestions. Here is a link to the quilt: http://www.commonthreadsquilting.com...nt/article/396
    Sandra

  2. #2
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I had someone once teach me to use fusible interfacing. Sew the right side of the fabric to the sticky side of the interfacing, leaving enough room to turn right side out. Then iron the applique where you want it placed on the quilt. Now there are no seams to turn over, but you also have a steady stable applique to sew on.

  3. #3
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat625 View Post
    I had someone once teach me to use fusible interfacing. Sew the right side of the fabric to the sticky side of the interfacing, leaving enough room to turn right side out. Then iron the applique where you want it placed on the quilt. Now there are no seams to turn over, but you also have a steady stable applique to sew on.
    When I learned that method we just snipped the interfacing in the center to turn it right side out. That way all the edges are totally sewn. This is the method that the Purple Thang comes in super handy for. It has a flat, slightly curved end that's perfect for getting the seams smoothed out.

  4. #4
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    If you really want to do needle turn appliqué than start with simple shapes without too many tight V shapes or points. Although it is tempting to leave a large turn under, a 1/8 of an inch is generous for needle turn appliqué. I found having a backboard to work on helpful. I cut a ceilng tile into a 12 inch square and used it to pin the top of the background block onto. It leaves the body of the block free to work on but keeps me from scrunching the block up when needle turning. When I scrunch the block up to work on it without the board, my appliqué gets off center and wonky. Start with a small project like a pillow top and do it to see if you like the technique. If not, there is no reason you can't do beautiful appliqué work doing the wonderunder fused technique. I did one beautiful floral bouquet pillow top and decided I would rather do fusible appliqué but if I ever want to do a needle turn project, I am confident with the technique.

  5. #5
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I learned this way. Place your applique pieces face down on a piece of muslin. The muslin doesn't have to be cut to the exact shape of your applique piece. Now sew the two pieces together. Trim away the excess muslin so it is the same shape as your applique piece. Cut a little slit in the middle of the muslin only. Turn the applique piece right side out. Use a bamboo skewer or your closed scissors to get all the points and seams straight. Press it. Now you have an applique piece that doesn't need to be needle turned. I always use a piece of fusible webbing (wonder under, steam a seam, etc) to hold the applique in place when sewing to the quilt block.
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  6. #6
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    I learned this way. Place your applique pieces face down on a piece of muslin. The muslin doesn't have to be cut to the exact shape of your applique piece. Now sew the two pieces together. Trim away the excess muslin so it is the same shape as your applique piece. Cut a little slit in the middle of the muslin only. Turn the applique piece right side out. Use a bamboo skewer or your closed scissors to get all the points and seams straight. Press it. Now you have an applique piece that doesn't need to be needle turned. I always use a piece of fusible webbing (wonder under, steam a seam, etc) to hold the applique in place when sewing to the quilt block.
    I think the muslin would be more stable than using fusible interfacing. I tried it with fusible interfacing, and the interfacing stretched when I turned it right side out. This left tiny slivers of interfacing visible at the edges of the applique, that were impossible to turn under.
    jlm5419-an Okie in California
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Junior Member judys's Avatar
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    Have you tried Jo Morton's technique? I'm sure you can find it by doing an online search. It was also explained in the previous issue of the Better Homes and Gardens Quilting magazine I think.

  8. #8
    Senior Member crafterrn1's Avatar
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    Okay here is my take on this applique BOM. I am a needleturn appliquer. I love applique! That being said as a new appliquer I would suggest that you do misty fuse for a softer quilt. You can also use steam a seam or heat and bond lite all being machine quilted. I would either match the threads to the color of fabric or use the YLI invisible threads. This BOM has many tiny tight turns that a new appliquer would have trouble with. I the nut that I am would do this as needle turn. But I have been doing applique for many many years. Luann in CT
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crafterrn1 View Post
    Okay here is my take on this applique BOM. I am a needleturn appliquer. I love applique! That being said as a new appliquer I would suggest that you do misty fuse for a softer quilt. You can also use steam a seam or heat and bond lite all being machine quilted. I would either match the threads to the color of fabric or use the YLI invisible threads. This BOM has many tiny tight turns that a new appliquer would have trouble with. I the nut that I am would do this as needle turn. But I have been doing applique for many many years. Luann in CT
    I agree! I taught myself, and it took me a while to be skilled enough to take on a complex block. You might be happier practicing needleturn on a simple block, and doing this project using another method.

    Janet

  10. #10
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    I agree. This is not a quilt to be done by a beginner. Start with something smaller. I learned on Elegant Garden blocks from Laundry Basket Quilts. I love needle turn applique but I learned with the freezer paper method first. Since then I have gone to back basting which I think is more accurate. I think the Country Gentleman would be beautiful done in hand applique but if you are a beginner you are only going to get frustrated and hate it. Start with something small, maybe take a class.
    Marilyn

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