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Thread: I know this is a dumb question, but....

  1. #1
    Super Member Misty's Mom's Avatar
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    I know this is a dumb question, but....

    Has anyone ever assembled your quilt blocks together using your serger? I would think it would cut down on raveling.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    I don't think it's a dumb question at all. I think my mom may have done some simple, large block quilts using the serger. I personally would be frightened of anything more complex but I'm not a serger expert.

  3. #3
    Junior Member gotthebug's Avatar
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    I have! I tried it on the last quilt I made . I really like how secure it is and the raveling is almost non existant. HOWEVER... It is kind of tough to manage that exact 1/4 in seam. I guess with lots of practice it will come easier. I will certainly try it again.

  4. #4
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    FIRST off there is no DUMB questions, only being dumb not asking. (not that your dumb!)

    I have not tried it but I would worry that if one makes a mistake ~ unsewing would be a pain. Also as previous poster mentioned, getting a accurate 1/4" seam could be tough.
    "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

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  5. #5
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    I pieced the back of a quilt with the scraps from the front. The front was done the "regular"way, and the back on the serger. I couldn't tell the difference!!! I thought it went well, I have been serging along time, and didn't have an issue with seam allowances, it was scrappy, so if I made a mistake (did make 2 or 3) I just sliced off the seam allowance and went at it again. Now, granted, you can't do that when you are following an exact pattern!

    My long-arm quilter did say it was noticeably thicker at the seam crossings, but she didn't have an issue with it. I made it in Oregon and shipped it to her in Alabama and she shipped it back...sort of a cross country journey!

    If you are comfortable with the serger and you are ok if it eats a few pieces that you can discard, I say go for it...lots faster, neater, cleaner on the backside and no raveling.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Eleanor Burns has whole videos on her website showing her doing it this way.

  7. #7
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    My blocks usually have a lot of piecing so matching seams could be an issue. Wouldn't mind doing it on big block quilts though. I do serge the edges of quilts that I'm hand appliqueing but plan on removing that edge when the blocks are finished.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I've done it. For me, it's much harder to be accurate on the seam allowance. There is a lot of extra thread in the seam allowance, which makes the seam allowance bulkier. Also, you cannot press the seam allowances open if you need to somewhere. And, matching seams is considerably more difficult. I would do it again, but only for a denim or similar type quilt and a pattern with large pieces that did not require matching seams.

    I did see a really cute one-layer denim quilt made by serger. The pieces were serged from the front with red wooly nylon thread, and then these seams were sewn down to lie flat. This was really cute, and it's been in the back of my mind to make that quilt someday.

  9. #9
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Alot of people make quilts with a serger. I have a serger but have never used it.

  10. #10
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    I've used mine for the backs, but it does make the seam allowance a little thicker. That could be an issue if you are planning on hand quilting.

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