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Thread: I know this is a dumb question, but....

  1. #1
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    I know this is a dumb question, but....

    Has anyone ever assembled your quilt blocks together using your serger? I would think it would cut down on raveling.

  2. #2
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    I don't think it's a dumb question at all. I think my mom may have done some simple, large block quilts using the serger. I personally would be frightened of anything more complex but I'm not a serger expert.

  3. #3
    Junior Member gotthebug's Avatar
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    I have! I tried it on the last quilt I made . I really like how secure it is and the raveling is almost non existant. HOWEVER... It is kind of tough to manage that exact 1/4 in seam. I guess with lots of practice it will come easier. I will certainly try it again.

  4. #4
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    FIRST off there is no DUMB questions, only being dumb not asking. (not that your dumb!)

    I have not tried it but I would worry that if one makes a mistake ~ unsewing would be a pain. Also as previous poster mentioned, getting a accurate 1/4" seam could be tough.
    "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

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  5. #5
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    I pieced the back of a quilt with the scraps from the front. The front was done the "regular"way, and the back on the serger. I couldn't tell the difference!!! I thought it went well, I have been serging along time, and didn't have an issue with seam allowances, it was scrappy, so if I made a mistake (did make 2 or 3) I just sliced off the seam allowance and went at it again. Now, granted, you can't do that when you are following an exact pattern!

    My long-arm quilter did say it was noticeably thicker at the seam crossings, but she didn't have an issue with it. I made it in Oregon and shipped it to her in Alabama and she shipped it back...sort of a cross country journey!

    If you are comfortable with the serger and you are ok if it eats a few pieces that you can discard, I say go for it...lots faster, neater, cleaner on the backside and no raveling.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Eleanor Burns has whole videos on her website showing her doing it this way.

  7. #7
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    My blocks usually have a lot of piecing so matching seams could be an issue. Wouldn't mind doing it on big block quilts though. I do serge the edges of quilts that I'm hand appliqueing but plan on removing that edge when the blocks are finished.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I've done it. For me, it's much harder to be accurate on the seam allowance. There is a lot of extra thread in the seam allowance, which makes the seam allowance bulkier. Also, you cannot press the seam allowances open if you need to somewhere. And, matching seams is considerably more difficult. I would do it again, but only for a denim or similar type quilt and a pattern with large pieces that did not require matching seams.

    I did see a really cute one-layer denim quilt made by serger. The pieces were serged from the front with red wooly nylon thread, and then these seams were sewn down to lie flat. This was really cute, and it's been in the back of my mind to make that quilt someday.

  9. #9
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Alot of people make quilts with a serger. I have a serger but have never used it.

  10. #10
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    I've used mine for the backs, but it does make the seam allowance a little thicker. That could be an issue if you are planning on hand quilting.

  11. #11
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    I hesitate to use my serger because I don't feel that I have as much control in making 1/4" seams with the serger like I do with the sewing machine. But if you are comfortable with it - go for it. I know they have demonstrated how to serge pieces together for a quilt at my sewing club but I missed that time.

  12. #12
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    I think the seams would be rather bulky, and the seams wouldn't be 1/4 inch. On some quilts that may not matter. But some quilts for the design to be right the 1/4 seam is important. Good quality fabric does not ravel.
    If you are having trouble with fabric raveling, buy better quality fabric to elliminate this problem.

  13. #13
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    I have serged some blocks together and the work was nice and even. The drawback was that it did add bulk to the seams. However, I do serge large pieces together for quillt backings. The seams are nice and even.

  14. #14
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    I wanted to try it so I pieced a shower curtain. That way the bulk of the seams was not an issue for quilting. It went together pretty well and I was pleased with it, but I'm not sure I would do it for a quilt.

  15. #15
    Super Member Charming's Avatar
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    I haven't tried that yet but here is a book i have seen on Nancy's Notions' website about that

    http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...quilts+book.do
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    Www.easyquiltingcorner.com

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  16. #16
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    I have not done this but I have certainly fantasized about it! You could really go to town on it doing a scrap quilt.

  17. #17
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    A friend of mine only uses her serger and no other. It has a perfect 1/4" seam and she swears by it. I'm addicted to my 201 but I do have a serger. I've never used it for quilting though.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  18. #18
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
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    I have not used my serger for piecing a quilt, but I have used it for the edge before putting on the binding. I did it on a baby quilt and it finished really nice. I do not think that I would do this to a full size quilt. I have been told that you cannot quilt a serged quilt, but I have done it in the past. Yes the seam is a little thick, but it was not an issue for my machine.

  19. #19
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    I have a serger, in fact 2 sergers, and use them for apparel assembly and edging fleece throws. There are a few issues to consider when using a serger for quilting. The seams become bulkier from all the extra thread, and if you are using white or light color fabric, that will show through to the front. I have a long arm and it is not too crazy about bulky seams. It works wonderfully for making flannel quilts where you will be doing a simple SID or straight line quilting. Another thing I find, is that the seam draws up a little if you use too close a stitch, causing some puckering of the fabric...ironing takes this out of most serger sewing, but after laundry it is back to the slightly puckered state. So you need to think about these issues before you decide to use the serger. Make some block samples first and see how you like it. As stated before, I wouldn't use in on a complicated block design. Nancy's Notions has some great ideas for using the serger in your quilting.

  20. #20
    Junior Member nlpakk's Avatar
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    I used my serger when I made a blue jean quilt for my grandson and it worked well and sure kept the ravels under control. It probably is a little thicker at the intersecting seams. For quilting I only did horizontal rows of regular stitching across the middle of each block/row. I did have a bit of problem with not all the blocks being the same size, which came from not being accurate with the seam allowance. I would use it again with certain fabrics.

  21. #21
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Ie done that, but it really increases the bulk of the seams because of too much thread. I only did it for a wallhanging I knew no one would see the back of. I wouldn't put it in a quilt. If you are concerned about raveling, perhaps use a bigger seam allowance or a different fabric,

  22. #22
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    I live in Pennsylvania, north of Lancaster..a lot of Mennonite neighbors, they do a LOT of quilts for charity and most ALL, if not all, are made with a serger.

  23. #23
    Member mariolkapolka's Avatar
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    I use my serger all the time. I made some nice baby quilts using Kaye Wood's video from Youtube. When making nicer top I piece it using my machine, quilt it with flannel or backing and construct the quilt using serger. Using serger has its limitations as to size of the quilt, because it is harder to square it off. I also serge the edge of all my quilts, it makes attaching binding a snap. Name:  105_1908.jpg
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  24. #24
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    I sew all my quilt tops with my serger. The lady that does my machine quilting is also pleased with at least knowing the edges have been serged. It really does cut out the raveling! Also, the seam is 1/4".

  25. #25
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    I tried it and didn't like the issues with matching seams on piecing....maybe it would work on plan blocks....I usually starch my fabric and have no issue with raveling.
    Diana in TX

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