Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36

Thread: I need help with a Binding Question

  1. #11
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    1,ooo miles from home
    Posts
    13,132
    Blog Entries
    2
    look up this online, bringing backing to the front for binding. there should be info out there for you and maybe a video, tute too. good luck. it can be done.

  2. #12
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    5,356
    I'd just like to stick my nose into the conversation, to share a binding tip. If you can, use a patterned/printed fabric, for your binding (rather than solid). With a print, your stitches won't be as obvious and if they get a bit crooked, it won't be as noticeable. Even better, is to add a printed border and match your binding to that! With the right color thread, those stitches will all but disappear!
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  3. #13
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    I will NEVER use bias binding for a straight edged quilt. Too much chance of the binding getting pulled out of shape and causing binding or quilt puckers.
    I only use bias if I am binding a curve, like oval place mats or round potholders or scalloped quilt edge. I do prefer my straight of grain binding to be folded in half (I believe this is called a French binding) then sewn on basically double, this way you have double binding on the edge of the quilt which seems to get the Most abuse. IMHO
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  4. #14
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,805
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Good point. Lord knows I don't want to give anyone fits, lol. I was trying to ward off the Quilt Police, who sometimes insert their opinion that quilts HAVE to be done a certain way. Personally I prefer the trim-and-bind method.
    LOL, it's a real delicate balance between the two!

  5. #15
    Junior Member x7lillies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    157
    You don't *need* to do anything! Whatever way you choose to do it is right. I've done it both ways. Folding over is easier, but the stitching will show unless you hand-finish it. And I find that the corners are a little harder to miter that way. I think I'm a separate binding person, because I like the little extra splash of color a good binding can bring.

    For the fold over, if it's a big quilt, I fold the backing in so the raw edge goes just under the batting, then fold over the rest. I double-check my width using (usually) a 2-finger rule. Any less than that and it's a pain for me. It's probably about an inch and a half.

    For binding, I use 2.5", folded in half along the length and then pressed. I use a quarter inch seam for smaller quilts, and 3/8" for larger ones (leaves me a little more wiggle room when feeding through the machine). In either case, I hand-finish to the back using an applique stitch so it's invisible.

    Since you have 3" left, I think you can do either method
    - Kim

    kimkolbquilts.etsy.com

  6. #16
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    24,148
    I never use bias or straight of grain binding strips. I use 2-1/2" strips, cut width of fabric, Fold in half and press, joined on the diagonal and usually round my corners, I pull the binding kind of tight when I sew onto the front, then hand stitch onto the back. I suggest you look this up on here or look in quilting books and try different ways to see what works for you. I have been quilting 45-46 years.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  7. #17
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,679
    Blog Entries
    5
    Go to YouTube and type in "quilt binding". Up will pop so many different ways to bind. I do not like to bind quilts. I am not "into" binding for some reason, even though that's the very end of the quilt. But, if you type that in, you will find out many ways to choose from. That's probably the easiest way to learn. You need to put the raw edges of the binding against the raw edges of the quilt and sew it that way. No one said that. I wouldn't know that if I never bound a quilt before. I thought I would mention it in case you didn't know that part. But check out YouTube. Lots of variety!!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Tn
    Posts
    436
    So many opinions. I have done both ways. Depending on the quilt and it's purpose. Sometimes it depends on how much fabric I have for binding if it is a scrap quilt. Usually the backing folded to the front does just fine on this. As a newbie, I hope you will continue to quilt and you can have the opportunity to try one and then another. If you still are undecided, make a couple small wall quilts to give a try on.

  9. #19
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    6,725
    Blog Entries
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by bigsister63 View Post
    There a 2 ways you can do binding. If you want your binding to be the same as your backing then you can cut this extra fabric to 2", press fabric in half, fold it over sandwich and then stitch to the front. If you do not want the binding the same then you need to trim the all layers including backing even. Then cut 2 1/2" strips fold in half and attach to the sandwich. It can be attached to front if you want to hand stitch binding down or to back if you wan to machine stitch binding down. There are many good tuts on attaching binding. do a search on thise board oro the internet and you will find many. Good luck!!!!

    I do my binding both ways with one difference. When using a seperate binding ( not turning backing to front) I sew the binding on before I trim the excess off. The quilt feeds through the dogs better when the walking foot or presser foot is on material. When you trim extra batting and backing first and then sew the binding on only half of the presser foot is being used and can cause the fabric to drift.

    Hope this helps some.
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  10. #20
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    6,725
    Blog Entries
    31
    Nana up north;

    I have heard this same information and I agree with it but so many people are afraid of anything that resembles 'bias'. Everyone should try a small sampler sandwich with bias binding just to try it and practice it.

    One other thing that I learned right here on the QB is to not press the binding in half before you sew it to the quilt.
    Just simply lay the two raw edges together as you align them on the edge of the quilt and sew them down.

    I love this and never have a crease to deal with to get in the right place. Binding turns to the back easily and looks great!
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.