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Thread: I need help with a Binding Question

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    I do my binding both ways with one difference. When using a seperate binding ( not turning backing to front) I sew the binding on before I trim the excess off. The quilt feeds through the dogs better when the walking foot or presser foot is on material. When you trim extra batting and backing first and then sew the binding on only half of the presser foot is being used and can cause the fabric to drift.

    Hope this helps some.
    peace



    That's the way I do it, too. Then when I trim, I put the 1/2 inch line of my ruler on the seam line so that I have 1/4 inch "filling" so that the binding is full.

  2. #22
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    Years ago binding was only a single fold so DDT wear. With today's double fold there isn't as much of a wearing problem.

  3. #23
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    I learned to do binding by watching YOUTUBE videos. Especially the one by the MISSOURI STAR QUILT COMPANY.

  4. #24
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    I made a quilt using the backing for the binding 23 years ago and I first now it is wearing out. I dearly love the quilt and will now cut the worn binding off and add a new binding to it. I guess it is a personal choice. At the time it was easier for me to just use the backing and it framed the front nicely.

  5. #25
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    One of the most helpful classes I ever took was a binding "how-to"... bindings don't scare me anymore and they come out smoothly every time... I agree with those who say to go online and check out some tutorials, then practice on a small "quilt"... for our class we were to bring a small "quilt"... I found cheater fabric at Walmart (many years ago) of a patchwork and made 2 small quilts for my dogs... killed two birds with one stone, as they say...
    Good luck!!!
    "... let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us."

  6. #26
    Junior Member krisgray's Avatar
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    I like bringing the backing to the front as binding because I only have to take the quilt through the machine once (I sew it down on the front with either a straight stitch close to the edge or a decorative stitch). This is what I do after wrestling with larger quilts and binding strips in the past. Try them both and see what you prefer. I use Better Homes & Garden Complete Guide to Quilting as it gives about 3 methods. The first response to your query is something new I will have to try as it's a bit different than what I've done from the book. Always something new here...

  7. #27
    Senior Member batikmystique's Avatar
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    Yes, I agree...thanks, bigsister63! Also, unless you already have a binding tool, I would suggest the one from Fons & Porter. It's easy to use and my binding strips always meet perfectly. :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by bigsister63 View Post
    There a 2 ways you can do binding. If you want your binding to be the same as your backing then you can cut this extra fabric to 2", press fabric in half, fold it over sandwich and then stitch to the front. If you do not want the binding the same then you need to trim the all layers including backing even. Then cut 2 1/2" strips fold in half and attach to the sandwich. It can be attached to front if you want to hand stitch binding down or to back if you wan to machine stitch binding down. There are many good tuts on attaching binding. do a search on thise board oro the internet and you will find many. Good luck!!!!
    Creative clutter is better than idle neatness.

  8. #28
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    I personally prefer a separate binding piece, but that's just me. Many people like just turning a piece of the backing over and sewing it down. In the end, it is what YOU like. After all, it's your quilt. Do whichever method you think looks best.

  9. #29
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    I cut my backing so that it is just an inch or so wider than my quilt after I have it quilted. I then turn it to the front and sew it down. Looks fine to me that way but then I only quilt for family.

  10. #30
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    On some of my grandmother's quilts, she turned the back to the front and bound it that way. However, those bindings have worn and and in some cases have areas of fabric missing. On others she used the double french method and they have held up much better. With that said, I use the french method to bind. I finish by hand because it makes such a beautiful binding. Too much work getting to that point for me to not finish off the best way I can. I actually enjoy binding. To me it is like putting the icing on the cake.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
    Lynda

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