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Thread: I need help with a Binding Question

  1. #1
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    I need help with a Binding Question

    After sandwiching and quilting, the backing of my quilt extends a little more than 3 inches past the edges of the quilt top. Do I fold this fabric over the front and use it for my binding or do I need to cut the excess fabric off even with the top edge and sew on a seperate strip for my binding? If so, how wide do I need to cut my strips? This will be my first time to do a binding and I want it to be done correctly and look as nicely as possible. Thank you in advance for your help.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  2. #2
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    There a 2 ways you can do binding. If you want your binding to be the same as your backing then you can cut this extra fabric to 2", press fabric in half, fold it over sandwich and then stitch to the front. If you do not want the binding the same then you need to trim the all layers including backing even. Then cut 2 1/2" strips fold in half and attach to the sandwich. It can be attached to front if you want to hand stitch binding down or to back if you wan to machine stitch binding down. There are many good tuts on attaching binding. do a search on thise board oro the internet and you will find many. Good luck!!!!

  3. #3
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    I always cut the excess off once I've quilted my sandwich. It's not a good idea to use binding that is cut with the grain of fabric....... straight with the selvage or cut edge. The reason I was told is because with the straight of the fabric there is only one thread that runs along the edge and it will get worn and tear with use. I know that is true because I have several old quilts that have the binding worn along the fold. If you use bias strips you will have 100's of threads along the fold and they will make the edge stronger and less chance of wear.

    I cut my bias 2 1/4" and fold it in half. Then, I sew it onto the quilt using a 1/4" seam. 2 1/2" width binding works well, too, like bigsister63 said. You'll want to check out some of the tuts to help you do the corners or round off the corners and you won't have to worry with that. Then, I turn the folded edge to the back and hand stitch it in place.

    Good luck..... let us see your finished project..... I'm excited for you.

    nanna

  4. #4
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    I always cut the excess off once I've quilted my sandwich. It's not a good idea to use binding that is cut with the grain of fabric....... straight with the selvage or cut edge. The reason I was told is because with the straight of the fabric there is only one thread that runs along the edge and it will get worn and tear with use. I know that is true because I have several old quilts that have the binding worn along the fold. If you use bias strips you will have 100's of threads along the fold and they will make the edge stronger and less chance of wear.

    I cut my bias 2 1/4" and fold it in half. Then, I sew it onto the quilt using a 1/4" seam. 2 1/2" width binding works well, too, like bigsister63 said. You'll want to check out some of the tuts to help you do the corners or round off the corners and you won't have to worry with that. Then, I turn the folded edge to the back and hand stitch it in place.

    Good luck..... let us see your finished project..... I'm excited for you.

    nanna

    I will NEVER use bias binding for a straight edged quilt. Too much chance of the binding getting pulled out of shape and causing binding or quilt puckers.
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  5. #5
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    I have used bias, and straight of grain, have never had a problem with either, Welcome to the world of quilting!Enjoy the adventure!

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramie bj View Post
    I have used bias, and straight of grain, have never had a problem with either
    Ditto, and I wanted to add that whether you use the backing or cut it off and sew on binding is totally a personal choice. It's your quilt, do what you like.

  7. #7
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Ditto, and I wanted to add that whether you use the backing or cut it off and sew on binding is totally a personal choice. It's your quilt, do what you like.

    I think that "it's your quilt, do what you like" is the part that gives newbies fits. The real problem is not knowing what you like yet when you're new to something.

    That said, I folded over the backing on the first quilt I made. A lot of really old quilts are bound that way. The problem with that method is by the time the edge wears out you don't have any of the original fabrics left to repair it with.

    I personally like French fold, straight grain binding. French fold is the one where you fold the binding in half and sew both raw edges to the quilt. Single fold or double fold are where the raw edges are folded in to the center of the binding and it's only one layer thick over the edge of the quilt. All of them can be cut on cross, lengthwise or bias grain lines.

  8. #8
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    There's also the one where you sew right sides together and leave an opening. Turn right side out. Technically not binding but another way to finish your quilt.

    Oh and there is facing - where you sew the fabric piece to right side and fold completely over at seam line so that it doesn't show on front. Then hand sew edge down on back.

  9. #9
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    I think that "it's your quilt, do what you like" is the part that gives newbies fits. The real problem is not knowing what you like yet when you're new to something.
    Good point. Lord knows I don't want to give anyone fits, lol. I was trying to ward off the Quilt Police, who sometimes insert their opinion that quilts HAVE to be done a certain way. Personally I prefer the trim-and-bind method.

  10. #10
    Super Member mary quilting's Avatar
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    You will find lots of good advise on this board .No one way of doing binding. Do what works for you . I do strait of gran cut 2.5" folded in half unless I have a curvy border
    Quote Originally Posted by BETTY62 View Post
    After sandwiching and quilting, the backing of my quilt extends a little more than 3 inches past the edges of the quilt top. Do I fold this fabric over the front and use it for my binding or do I need to cut the excess fabric off even with the top edge and sew on a seperate strip for my binding? If so, how wide do I need to cut my strips? This will be my first time to do a binding and I want it to be done correctly and look as nicely as possible. Thank you in advance for your help.

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