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Thread: I now TOTALLY get why many quilters have so many UFOs

  1. #21
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Try to find a pattern that doesn't have so many stops and goes. Look for a pattern that is continuos line. Also I agree with some other posters, maybe branch out to free motion quilting.
    Anna Quilts

  2. #22
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    When a project starts to go south on me, I put it away in "time out", then I pick up or start another project, so I have several projects going at once. I also go in spurts, last fall I made 12 Bow Tucks bags for a craft fair, then had to do some regular quilt piecing for a change, but then I'd get a call to make another bag, and I can't afford to turn down the $. I tend to switch off to different projects according to my mood, or especially if I'm having trouble with the project.

  3. #23
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Harriet Hargrave says that a lot of UFOs happen because the quilting is more of an afterthought. She suggests to think about the quilting as part of the initial pattern design. I adopted that attitude and it does make the quilting easier when I have a plan.

    Don't give up. Practice, Practice, Practice!
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  4. #24
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I attended a GREAT FMQ class given by Paula Reid last week. She had us SID around only the blocks to stabilize the quilt. After that you can FMQ without worrying about running into pins or sewing puckers into the backing. We practiced FMQ on muslin sandwiches on which we had used simple stencils to mark quilting lines. In just a day, we learned a lot about how to move the fabric to follow the lines. She said you need to practice at least 30 minutesor an hour, EVERY day for a month to feel comfortable with FMQ.

  5. #25
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    I'd love to FMQ...my machine won't play nice. I don't have the darning plate, but I covered the feed dogs w/tape, and tried it, but the fabric still wouldn't budge...not an inch. So I am currently of the opinion that my machine will only do straight line quilting either SITD or a cross hatch. Sigh.

  6. #26
    Super Member twinkie's Avatar
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    I agree. Piecing is more fun than FMQ. I also do my piecing on a Featherweight.

  7. #27
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Teeler, the only way I got rid of the ice pick between my shoulders was by quilting standing up. My cutting table is the right height, as is my kitchen island. I do recommend making a styrofoam "surround" so you have a large flat surface around the machine (Youtube videos show how to make this), although I have also quilted without one.

    Quilting while standing relieves all that pressure on the shoulders and neck.

  8. #28
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post
    I'd love to FMQ...my machine won't play nice. I don't have the darning plate, but I covered the feed dogs w/tape, and tried it, but the fabric still wouldn't budge...not an inch. So I am currently of the opinion that my machine will only do straight line quilting either SITD or a cross hatch. Sigh.
    Did you change to a darning foot? You can't FMQ with a regular foot. You need a floating foot or a hopping foot for FMQ.

  9. #29
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    Wink

    My Quilter Friend, the More , the merrier. Sometime we just do other thing or project, do what we want to do, everyday, it's like FOOD, we don't EAT the same food everyday. Try to EXPLORE or to learn other tricks or technique, so we set aside other project, we all go back and finish it!

  10. #30
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackie Spencer View Post
    I don't consider my finished quilt tops UFO's.
    Me either.

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