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Thread: I now TOTALLY get why many quilters have so many UFOs

  1. #1
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    I now TOTALLY get why many quilters have so many UFOs

    ...because the quilting part !

    Well, not totally terrible, but pretty close. I feel like I'm making no progress, and with an older machine, it's a pretty tedious process. I hope I'm doing this right...I've got a half log cabin pattern, and I'm just doing SITD...but there are all these stopping & starting points so I have a ton of hangy strings that I'm burying...I didn't make much progress today
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 03-24-2013 at 05:33 PM. Reason: language

  2. #2
    Senior Member kaelynangelfoot's Avatar
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    Stick with it! Change projects to keep your mind fresh and creative and then get back to the quilting part when you are ready. I like piecing better than quilting anyway...

  3. #3
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
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    send your quilts to me! I hate making tops and only like doing the FMQ!!
    You can have any design you want. As long as it's loops!

  4. #4
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    Hi teeler,
    I am thinking that you need to branch out and do some creative quilting to get to love it. You see the stitch in the ditch is nice, but it really limits your creative side. Think outside the box and find an all over pattern to play with. There are some nice books on learning to quilt that will open your eyes to another world of quilting you are missing. There are tons of titles available. The quilting can even change a very plain quilt into something jaw-dropping. Next time you go to a quilt show, check out the quilting, you will see what I mean.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  5. #5
    Junior Member jzaaboo's Avatar
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    SID is slower than FMQ. I'm not a huge fan of quilting, I'd rather piece, too, but the more you do the better you get and the faster and easier it is and the more you like it.

  6. #6
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I hand quilt and love it..I get anxious to get to the next project tho..This caused many UFO's, so I now do not allow myself to have more than 3 projects....

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I refuse to do SITD anymore. It was too nerve-wracking for me, and I was never satisfied with the results.

    With a half log cabin, I would look for a way to quilt from one edge of the quilt to another edge (so there are no hanging strings). The stitching would be going step-wise.

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    Hey Prism99, that sounds like a good idea to me, too. I haven't done much finishing work, but that sounds like something I could do on my fence rail quilt. I was wondering how to go about quilting it. I had thought about following a path through the quilt by stitching next to the ditch. I really think I will try your idea. Thanks!

  9. #9
    Super Member Judith1005's Avatar
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    Teeler, I hope you find a method that works for you. I also am so not fond of the actual quilting of a quilt. (yet!?) I really enjoy piecing quilts. I really need to learn something besides SID also. I do pretty well with the small projects. But it usually takes me forever to finish the big ones.
    My little shinning stars. Brantley, Kaylynn, and Emmalee

  10. #10
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    For some reason, I really, really enjoy SITD. Now, I am working on doing it FMQ. My lines are not quite as good as they are with a walking foot; but I am getting there. I do bury lots of threads; but I plan where I am going to sew beforehand so that I have fewer starts and stops. Also, I do not quilt for long periods of time. I quilt on my Bernina, then move over to my Featherweight to do some piecing or work on cutting out fabric for a new quilt top. At night, I do appliqué or embroidery on a quilt block. That schedule works for me. I need to break up the quilting with other activities such as piecing. Best wishes on your quilting.

  11. #11
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    There's also different ways to do quilt as you go.

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    I attended a class where we were told that if the beginning/ending stitches were secure,we could closely clip them( without the hassle of burying them. It's sure a lot faster.
    Life may not be the party we planned for,but while we are here we should dance!

  13. #13
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    Nice to see so many ideas. I love SITD, enjoy just stitching away. I also FMQ, but not in a traditional way. I just use my regular foot and my machine - just a basic singer hd110...I can move forward, backward and sideways. I admire how amazing some of the pictures I've seen posted here are. I can only hope...practice, practice, practice!

  14. #14
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    I have a friend who loves FMQ . Every time she stops and starts she sews her ends in and every new bobbin she cleans the bobbin casing. Sounds slow going but at the end she has finished.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  15. #15
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    I don't consider my finished quilt tops UFO's. I used to quilt by hand, but now only hand quilt small things, I send my quilt tops out to be quilted. My UFO's are quilts I have started, and for some reason or other (usually another pattern I could'nt wait to start) got layed aside, temporarily. I have too many of them, thats for sure!

  16. #16
    Super Member HillCountryGal's Avatar
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    Machine quilting is not my favorite part of the process. The current quilt I'm working on has some machine quilting and the rest hand-tied. Tried machine quilting all of it, but fast became a pain in the hiney. After fighting it for two days, I remembered several posts here saying "there are no rules", "do it your way".

    Stitch-in-the-ditch seems too tiedious to me. I tend to do cross stitching.

  17. #17
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    So Day #2 on the quilting effort wasn't AS BAD as Day #1. I planned out my stitching paths, and had fewer hangy threads.
    The worst part, is I also now get the issue with shoulder and neck pain. Wow. I feel like I have an ice pick right in the center under my right shoulder blade, and turning my neck to the side is a problem. DS says "ma, you need to work out," I respond that quilting apparently IS "working out."
    Sleep was nearly non-existent, even with a sleep aid (should have just opted for the Advil instead).

    So, tell me, is there anyone here who has figured out the ergonomics of quilting? Do I need to do it standing up instead?

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    Teeler,
    It is very important to vary your activity to avoid the issues with neck and back pain. All o our bodies have different tolerance levels and we need to work with it. I try not to FMQ on a large project for more than an hour at a time. I like to STID around every square and around each border so the quilt is stable. I like to use 60 wt thread on the top and whatever thread I use for the whole project in the bobbin. After stabliizing I can quilt wherever I want. As a result I quilt from the outside to the center. As soon as I have the border quilted I put on the binding-this removes a lot of bulk and is easier to handle. I like to hand stitch the binding to the back and do a little bit at a time. Usually my binding is finished before the quilting is finished. I always have more than one project going so I can use my body in different ways through the day. I set goals so a project needing to be quilted gets done. I'm doing an intricate design in 48 squares now-I do 2 squares each day-and them move on.

  19. #19
    IQ2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post

    So, tell me, is there anyone here who has figured out the ergonomics of quilting?
    Hi Teeler---very important question! I saw a chiroprator for years after the early days of working at a computer in the wrong position. You need to make sure that your chair height is correct to keep your shoulders level when you're sewing. Also, as purpledog advised, take hourly breaks. One of the board members once said that she sips water while she works so that she has to get up and go to the bathroom as a reminder to take breaks. And your son's advice about working out is good too. Get up, stretch, do some head turns and head rolls. Good luck. Once you work out your positions and routine you'll have much more fun

  20. #20
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    hey, we've got an ARTICLE! http://www.quiltingboard.com/resources/article-90.html

    And there's actually "quilting ergonomics" references online! Who knew?! I didn't even think to google it earlier. Excellent!

    Machine Quilting for Beginners- Stress Free Ergonomic Quilting

    In the Zone- Ergonomics for the Stitchy Set

    15 Ergonomic Tips for Quilters

  21. #21
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Try to find a pattern that doesn't have so many stops and goes. Look for a pattern that is continuos line. Also I agree with some other posters, maybe branch out to free motion quilting.
    Anna Quilts

  22. #22
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    When a project starts to go south on me, I put it away in "time out", then I pick up or start another project, so I have several projects going at once. I also go in spurts, last fall I made 12 Bow Tucks bags for a craft fair, then had to do some regular quilt piecing for a change, but then I'd get a call to make another bag, and I can't afford to turn down the $. I tend to switch off to different projects according to my mood, or especially if I'm having trouble with the project.

  23. #23
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Harriet Hargrave says that a lot of UFOs happen because the quilting is more of an afterthought. She suggests to think about the quilting as part of the initial pattern design. I adopted that attitude and it does make the quilting easier when I have a plan.

    Don't give up. Practice, Practice, Practice!
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  24. #24
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I attended a GREAT FMQ class given by Paula Reid last week. She had us SID around only the blocks to stabilize the quilt. After that you can FMQ without worrying about running into pins or sewing puckers into the backing. We practiced FMQ on muslin sandwiches on which we had used simple stencils to mark quilting lines. In just a day, we learned a lot about how to move the fabric to follow the lines. She said you need to practice at least 30 minutesor an hour, EVERY day for a month to feel comfortable with FMQ.

  25. #25
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    I'd love to FMQ...my machine won't play nice. I don't have the darning plate, but I covered the feed dogs w/tape, and tried it, but the fabric still wouldn't budge...not an inch. So I am currently of the opinion that my machine will only do straight line quilting either SITD or a cross hatch. Sigh.

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