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Thread: Lap Blanket or Bed Shawls for Hospice

  1. #1
    Junior Member lynn7448's Avatar
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    Lap Blanket or Bed Shawls for Hospice

    Hi!
    I live in Florida and want to make some lap blankets or bed type shawls for the Hospice patients. What type of batting would you recommend or should I just us a flannel backing without any batting. Any recommendations on the size of the bed shawls or patterns?
    Hospice was a great support and comfort for my Mom and my family before she passed and I want to give back to them.
    Lynn

  2. #2
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    I also live in Florida. Hospice in my area have very specific directions for lap quilts. I suggest containing hospice in your area for their preferences.

  3. #3
    Super Member HillCountryGal's Avatar
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    I was a Hospice employee (volunteer coordinator).
    THANK YOU for offering to make lap robes for the patients. My first thought would be to remember if they're used in a nursing home, they will be washed in very hot water. I made lap robes out of double knit fabric.. amazing how many people still have some in their stash. That fabric lives forever! I did not use batting in those, just two layers of double knit. If they are used for someone in a wheel chair, you need to consider the wheels, etc. so they can't be too big. You might check with your local Hospice AND nursing home for size requirements, etc.

    Another thing that was most useful was small pillows. The nurses said they were great for pressure points. Some as small as 6"x12" not stuffed too tightly were just the thing. Another good use for your smaller pieces of fabric. And the fun prints put a smile on the patients face.

    Whatever you make will be most appreciated!

    **Be sure to keep track of your time. Some Hospice offices need that information too.

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thank you, hillcountrygal, this is very useful information. i'm one of those with doubleknits in my stash.
    Nancy in western NY

  5. #5
    Junior Member lynn7448's Avatar
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    I did contact the local Hospice and asked if they had specific requirements and they stated they did not, so I asked all of you to help. This is a facility that provides Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care with end-of-life services to the patient and family. Thanks for all of your advise.

  6. #6
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I'd use whatever batting you are comfortable with. Polyester is lighter than cotton, but warmer. Poly would be nice because when everything hurts, the weight of a quilt makes it worse. Also lighter to carry to treatments or from room to room if treatments have been stopped. Patients are often chilly even when we aren't, so I'd definitely use batting. Medium weight Mountain Mist polyester would work for me.

  7. #7
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    I too, would use batting because as irishrose said, the older people are usually cold and a quilt is both comforting as well as giving warmth.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  8. #8
    Super Member CoyoteQuilts's Avatar
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    I use cotton in mine. I just gave 3 quilts all in flannel used my left over warm and natural. The last ones I did that were a hit were made with flannel on the back and cotton pieced tops with cotton/poly or W&N batting. All that I have heard they were appreiciated and well loved. Mine are 34 x 41 inches.

  9. #9
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    I make shawls for people in nursing homes using two layers of flannel, no batting. I also put pockets in them because older people often have cold hands.
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

  10. #10
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    I disagree that polyester is warmer than cotton. Flannel is a great.choice for warmth.

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