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Thread: Machine Quilting on Regular Sewing Machine?

  1. #1
    Cathie_R's Avatar
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    I am working on a twin sized quilt for my Granddaughter's graduation in May. I usually hand quilt everything except I have done some throw sized quilts on my sewing machine. It was a struggle. Am I going to have major problems machine quilting this? My machine is a Brother Pacesetter with a throat size of only 9 inches. I think I'm going to be afraid to start it. Any suggestions? I don't want to have it done by a professional as I want the work to be from me. She is special, as all granddaughters are. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Junior Member ProLongarmARTQUILTER's Avatar
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    Yes you can do it on a reg machine, you can either roll it really tight OR do the quilting in sections like make 4 baby quilts then put them together. But some do it a block at a time then after the quilting like the sections Put them all together.

  3. #3
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I have quilted every one of the 100 some odd quilts that I have made on my own home sewing machine. Some on my old Pfaff and some on my newer Bernina with the 7" throat, or whatever they are. I have made at least 12 queen size.
    It can be done.
    I have never quilted in sections and put together.
    I have done a lot of diagonal quilting where I have rolled it but have also "nested" the quilt and worked on a small area at a time.

  4. #4
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    Drop your feed dogs, use a darning foot and go for it if you are free motioning it. Otherwise, raise your feed dogs and use a walking foot for straight line and stitching in the ditch.

    You shouldn't have any trouble. If you do, let us know and someone will help.

  5. #5
    CAROLJ's Avatar
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    I don't like rolling my quilts tight as it becomes very stiff and its like moving a log around. I just squish them as tight as I can get them against the inside.

  6. #6
    Super Member amazon's Avatar
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    Cathie, I quilt on a regular machine and have used my Brother also, my feed dogs don't drop on it so you have to use the darning plate, I divide my quilt visually in fourths, then working from the middle ,i sew down.stop.then back up top and then continue going middle to bottom , while working to my right out to the edge.then back to the middle then work left, you have to roll your quilt when working left.When bottom half is done turn and do top half. Hope this helps you, I'm sure someone on here can explain it better for you, I could show you better than explain it.Good luck, I'm sure she will love it whatever you do.

  7. #7
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
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    9 inches is really a good size! I've done twins on a 5x5. I roll each side and secure with clips and start in the middle and work outward.

  8. #8
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
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    I did on a Queen Size quilt on my domestic machine. It was a struggle, but worth it in the longrun. I used the squish method. Rolling it made it stiff and hard to manipulate.

  9. #9

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    Take a close up look what was done here:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-40990-1.htm

    it's a beautiful job without stippling.

    Jois

  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    9" of space is do-able. i think there are several members who successfully machine quilt on machines smaller than that. my machine quilting is still pretty awful but here are a few things i've figured out as i try to get better. they may not work for you, but they make a difference for me.

    1. i roll the part of the quilt that will go through the throat when i'm doing long straight lines. i prop the roll over my shoulder to keep the weight off the machine.

    2. if i need to work on an inner section and will need to turn the quilt while i'm "sewing", it's easier if i either scrunch or roll it into a circle around the section i want to quilt. (have you ever seen the paper pouches they use to oven-poach fish on a cooking show? like that.)

    3. i had my machine in the bottom right-hand corner of my table. i make sure the space all the way around the table is clear of chairs so that nothing interferes with the movement of the quilt.

    4. i try as hard as i can to make the quilt "float above the machine surface. the more weight resting on the machine bed, the more drag there is. if the quilt bunches up too much either behind the machine or to the left, i end up with a "traffic jam". i lose control of the movement and end up with stitches so teeny tiny they are nearly impossible to pick out if it goes too wrong to leave alone.

    5. i have not been able to master the skill of moving my quilt around by placing my hands flat on it and sliding it around. even with one of those silicon mats, i can't achieve smooth movement. also, my hands get tired very quickly. so, instead of torturing myself i hold the roll or scrunch up in my right hand while the left is either scrunching some of the excess or it's under the excess, lifting the quilt. (hard to describe.)

    6. once i've figured out the best way to hold the quilt, the next critical factor for me is the speed at which i sew. too fast and i not only can't control it but the stitches are waaaaaaaaay too small. too slow and the stitches are huge and the movement gets jerky. (curves become spikes. not attractive. :lol: )

    i'd like to believe that my machine quilting would be better if i had a 36" throat. i suspect, though, that it will only improve when i have mastered the art of controlling the sandwich as is passes through and around the machine. until then, i plan to always use threads that match the top and back. that way, the gafooples don't show as much. :hunf: :lol:

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