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Thread: Very first time attempting machine quilting on regular sewing machine.

  1. #1
    Member Luv2quilt49's Avatar
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    Very first time attempting machine quilting on regular sewing machine.

    Do I need a special "quilting foot"? Don't want to ruin quilt. Afraid layers will shift. Spray basting already coming loose.
    Life may not be the party you expected it to be, but while you're here you might as well dance!

  2. #2
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    Depends on what you are going to do...straight line- walking foot.........FM- darning foot or hopping foot.......practice on small sandwich....... Check the tutes here for more info

    I would feel safer thread basting or pinning rather than spray basting....JMHO

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    You should put together some small practice pieces & do a lot of practicing Before attempting to quilt your ( real) quilt. Walking foot for straight line quilting * stitch in ditch, cross hatch, gentle curves*
    Hopping foot for free motion. Both take some practice. Walking foot works with your feed dogs, free motion quilting is done with feed dogs down so you can ( freely) control moving the fabric.
    There are many utube videos, tutorials to watch, help you see the process.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

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    My fusible batting didn't stick and I ended up with loads of pins in my quilt that I'm working on to try to keep it together. It will be awful to work on if it's coming apart. My machine has a few different feet for fmq and each one feels different. I would practice before you get to a real quilt too. My first efforts were ugly.

  5. #5
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
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    Okay, I use a walkingfoot and stitch in the ditch, shadow the outline of the block or go across the blocks. I also usually do my in 3 sections so that it is manageable on my home sewing machine. I have several machines from a Featherweight to the Singer Anniversary machine plus several in-between and have walking feet that work on all of them. Here are some pictures that might help including the finished quilt.
    Attached Images Attached Images



    Busy in Ohio

  6. #6
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I would also second CKCOWL's advice: don't practice on a real quilt! Make sure you feel comfortable quilting using a scrap sandwich. If your spray basting is coming loose thru just handling, I wouldn't trust it and would also pin.
    Use a walking foot for straight lines & gentle curves and you would need a hopping foot, FMQ foot OR darning foot for free motion quilting.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  7. #7
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I always encourage newbie quilters to practice on something like quilts for a dog shelter. The dogs get something comfortable to lie on and you get the practice. The dogs won't tell the quilt police about how well the quilt was quilted.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luv2quilt49 View Post
    Do I need a special "quilting foot"? Don't want to ruin quilt. Afraid layers will shift. Spray basting already coming loose.
    Around the edges? Safety pin the edges to keep the edges in place. If more is coming loose than just the edges, you may want to add safety pins throughout the body of the quilt. Just be careful and remove pins as you quilt. I ruined an expensive walking foot when a safety pin got caught by the foot; didn't notice until it was too late -- the spring in the foot was already pulled out of whack.

    For a first-time quilter, the easiest thing to do is to use a walking foot (helps keep the layers from shifting) and quilt wavy lines. This is ***much, much, much*** easier than trying to do straight lines or stitch-in-the ditch and any "mistakes" simply aren't mistakes. With a walking foot you sew with the feed dogs up (normal) and presser foot down (normal). Start at one edge of the quilt and sew across to the other edge, using your hands to gently guide the quilt left and right to make large, soft, wavy lines. Here are some photos of what it looks like when you are done:
    http://sewsweetness.com/2011/09/back...and-other.html (wavy or organic quilting)
    http://handmadewhimzy.blogspot.com/2...oss-quilt.html

  9. #9
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    I use a walking foot for most of my quilting. Once I figured out how to put it on my machine, I didn't have to worry about tension or stitch length at all. Using the curvy lines that Prism99 recommends above is the easiest for your first quilting, IMHO. For me the most difficult part about quilting on a standard home machine is managing the bulk of your quilt as you stitch. It takes frequent stops to "fluff and stuff" the quilt so that you can move ahead with stitching without creating any drag on the quilt. This is the part that takes some practice, and I find that working on a small piece before hand doesn't prepare you for this part of machine quilting. I got the most help by watching several different youtube videos online.

    I haven't ever used fusible batting, but I baste with needle and thread using a herringbone stitch and for good measure, secure with some safety pins, too! I'm not one for lots of gadgets, but I find that the quilting gloves are essential for me. I have a little arthritis in my hands and have trouble holding onto the quilt without them. Good luck!
    Elizabeth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luv2quilt49 View Post
    Do I need a special "quilting foot"? Don't want to ruin quilt. Afraid layers will shift. Spray basting already coming loose.
    There are a couple of fantastic classes on Craftsy by Ann Pederson about quilting on a DSM. She shows how to work on large quilts, how to set them up, STITD, doing borders, etc and also has you start on practice sandwiches. Really fantastic classes that I still go back to on occasion and always hear/see something that I missed before. And the classes are all on sale right now.

  11. #11
    shy
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    I do all my quilting now on a regular machine..so I can sit ..after many mistakes getting it right..have learned..always..baste .with all the movement it takes if it is a big quilt..things shift..also if u feel confident use a free motion foot ..such as a darning foot..if not a walking foot is best..a normal foot will push your material as u sew..which at times cause those awful pukers we all hate..

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    When I first started quilting I started with a walking foot to get comfortable with the quilting process and still have success. It was a good plan for me. When I started FMQ I tried it on a small baby quilt and made sure the thread blended in well to hide any flaws (and yes there were some of course). I always get warmed up on a small practice piece even now that I have done quite a few quilts with FMQ on my DSM. In the case of FMQ practice, practice, practice! Good luck!

  13. #13
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    I re beer my first FMQ. It was 45x60 and spray basted. Before that, I was a top maker because sewing or pin basting was awful. I had bought a can of basting at a quilt show which sat on a shelf for a few months. Then I went to a class for FMCG. I forget her name but her book was quilt as desired. As it turned out, my machine was not able to do FMQ. The shop owner let me use a babylock decorators choice which I loved and bought that day--it was $700.00 and had features I never knew about, needle down thread cutter and needle threaders. I was so nervous starting out but I was aiming for a meandering design which turned into angular lines and names of siblings and parents, this was for a GGS.
    it tuned out well and is well loved. A week after it was finished, I fell at Walmart and broke my wrist. Quilting put on hold but I continued. If your quilt is large, I suggest starting on a smaller piece. You won't be as apprehensive. Good luck.

  14. #14
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    Your quilt is very beautiful!

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    Lots of great advice about the feet you can use. If your spray basting is coming loose you can pull the layers loose & lightly spray again. I have had edges & corners come loose because I didn't spray far enough to the edges so I just did another quick spray. I have also had a quilt sprayed, layered & left rolled up for a few months. Everything was still stuck in place. Good Luck!

  16. #16
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    I use a walking foot or a darning foot when I quilt. But I do agree, it takes lots and lots of practice.

  17. #17
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    Spray basting works best on cotton batting. It does not stick well to poly batting. I have used it with no problems on full-size quilts, as long as batting was cotton. Craftsy has excellent classes on assembling quilts and using different types of assembly (spray, pins, etc.). Would highly recommend them, and they are on sale right now for about $20 a class.

  18. #18
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I have noticed several comments about your layering coming apart. I had the same problem until one of the wonderful members here mentioned glue basting. Glue basting is the best! Best part? You can't mess it up. If the glue shows through to the front, which it did on my first one, it just washes out when you are done! I even went on Amazon and bought glue by the gallon. Look out world, I got my glue and I am ready to start learning FMQ!
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  19. #19
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    Pretty quilt!
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  20. #20
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I machine quilt on one of my 9" throat machines. If straight line stitching I use walking foot. For FMQ I use a darning foot. I pin baste my quilt sandwich. I use the walking foot to sew binding to front of quilt. I hand sew binding to back of quilt. You may want to practice on a quilt sandwich.
    Another Phyllis
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  21. #21
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    I spray baste and then safety pins just to make sure the spay worked...check & double check I guess. I am still in the learning process so it's SID for me
    Jeri

  22. #22
    Senior Member donac's Avatar
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    I have used pins and spray basting. I like spray basting better. Just DON'T use a lot. Just a light spray will do.

  23. #23
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    if your spray basting is loosening, just run a warm iron over it unless you have markings on the quilt. You don't want to set those into the fabric. Have fun, practice on a sample block and enjoy the heck out of it

  24. #24
    Member Luv2quilt49's Avatar
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    Thank you all for sharing your time and expertise. I will be utilizing quite a few of these suggestions from now on.
    Life may not be the party you expected it to be, but while you're here you might as well dance!

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