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Thread: Machine Quilting on Regular Sewing Machine?

  1. #26
    Junior Member keesha_ont's Avatar
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    I quilt all my quilts on my Janome 6600. No problem!! Can't afford to pay for long arm quilting and I have done queen size quilts.

  2. #27

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    I was having the same trouble as you, but here is what I did: I make the quilt sandwich and then cut away the right hand third of the batting only. Use a wavy cut lineand label the top of both pieces of batting. That way you can easily replace the cutout batting when its time. Meanwhile, quilt the center third. You will not have the batting in the throat of your machine as you have cut it out. Turn around and quilt the right side of the quilt. Now, replace the cutaway batting. Whip stitch it exactly in the same place it was before you cut it away. Now you can quilt this third. Easy peasy!

  3. #28
    Super Member Quilter2B's Avatar
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    I haven't read the whole thread, but it can be done. I have done all of mine (only six) on my regular sewing machine. Some were baby and lap quilts and a couple of twins; I did do my queen size too. Yes it can be a struggle - even more so if you use a lofty batting. I've used warm & natural is all of mine so I mostly had to deal with bulk from fabric. I rolled my sandwich very tight, worked from the center out and tried to work with the least amount of bulk in the throat.

  4. #29
    Super Member Quilter2B's Avatar
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    Wezie: Your purple quilt is beautiful!!!!

  5. #30
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilter2B
    Wezie: Your purple quilt is beautiful!!!!
    Thank you! All of my quilts are "experiments" because I have a need to do something very different each time. That purple one just grew from a few paper pieced blocks.

    I wanted Cathy to see the quilting can be done on a small machine, with certain limitations. I can't even begin to describe how much I'd like to have a proper long-arm machine set up. I know just the one I want, too.

  6. #31
    Senior Member sewgray's Avatar
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    I'm a fan of "fluff and stuff" myself. To me, and it's only my opinion, it's just easier all around than trying to roll and clip.

  7. #32
    lazyquilter's Avatar
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    Congraulations Gayle... Two kids to be so very proud of. I am extremely happy with you for the coming home of your daughter, I will keep her in my prayers that she is not pulled back into a second tour anywhere over there. bluestarmom and proud of it.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Suse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssendelbach
    I was having the same trouble as you, but here is what I did: I make the quilt sandwich and then cut away the right hand third of the batting only. Use a wavy cut lineand label the top of both pieces of batting. That way you can easily replace the cutout batting when its time. Meanwhile, quilt the center third. You will not have the batting in the throat of your machine as you have cut it out. Turn around and quilt the right side of the quilt. Now, replace the cutaway batting. Whip stitch it exactly in the same place it was before you cut it away. Now you can quilt this third. Easy peasy!
    So that is how you do it. I have a very old Bernina with a 6-1/2" throat. I guess I need to buy a walking foot. I've been sending mine out, I've only made two so far. 8-)

  9. #34
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    kids quilts are great with a walking foot and the serpentine
    stitch (wavy). you can adjust stitch length and width to what
    you like. very forgiving to just go along the seams like stitch-in-ditch. even bindings look great with this stitch.

  10. #35
    Junior Member Campbell34's Avatar
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    A twin size quilt shuld not be a problem I just finished a king sixe quilt for my bed I did it in several pieces, I did the 12 squares first then added the three borders, I have since bought the 830 bernina , very large arm then just this week finished a kingsize all in one piece
    Attached Images Attached Images



  11. #36
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    I havent done it yet, but hopefully I will soon. sorry Penny

  12. #37
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    I have two ironing boards, one to iron, and one that I put at table level on my left side while quilting. It really comes in handy to help hold the weight of the quilt. My machine and table are level (flat bed to sew on) so I slide the board down to fit just under my table.

    I to am a scruncher, fluffler, smoosher LOl I bought the bicycle clips and tried rolling, but it just reatrained my movement too much.

    You will be fine, i have a Janome 1600 P-QC and it has a 9 inch throat, plenty of room for almost anything.

  13. #38
    Member fladack's Avatar
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    Sounds like you are starting out right by doing small quilts first. Twin is the size you should try next, so go for it, be brave. Always start in the middle and move toward the edges. I do free motion. Drop the feed dogs and use the darning foot. Another thing I always do it a practice piece. I layer up some extra blocks or just some ugly or plain fabric and practice on it first so I get the feel of the quilting design first. For example I wanted to do grass and I practiced that motion before I did it on my real quilt. Have fun, every quilt is a learning experience.

  14. #39
    Member fladack's Avatar
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    Just thought of another thing I do when quilting a bed size quilt. My machine is in a table top so I have a lot of space on the table at the same level as the machine. If my quilt is large and heavy I put a small same heighth table at my left to help hold up the quilt.

  15. #40
    lazyquilter's Avatar
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    absolutely stunning, and both of them just yell out loud that they are comfortable, cheerful and what a treat either for yourself or a family member.

    Yes, practice, practice, practice.

    Have a very sunny and georgious Easter Sunday..

  16. #41
    Super Member ania755's Avatar
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    9" throat is more then enough....I am a Brother person (only because I have a dealer close by).... They are great machines....I did big quilts on small machines too....Leave the fear behind and jump....you have the right equipment and a bunch of supporters behind you...
    Good luck :thumbup:

  17. #42
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    Have you tried your machine on a quilting frame? It has a big enough throat to do this. Then, depending on the frame, you can either sit or stand and quilt it the easy way.

  18. #43
    Senior Member quiltingmimipj's Avatar
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    You should look on this board at the topic:

    Who Does Free Motion Quilting? Share Your Tips with Us

  19. #44

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    Thanks for the website Mimi. I subscribed to their newsletter.

    I'm just learning to fmq also so, I'm learning from you all. I don't have any tips to add except I seem to feel more relaxed if I play some music on my I-Pod. Everything just seems to go smoother.

  20. #45
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssendelbach
    I was having the same trouble as you, but here is what I did: I make the quilt sandwich and then cut away the right hand third of the batting only. Use a wavy cut lineand label the top of both pieces of batting. That way you can easily replace the cutout batting when its time. Meanwhile, quilt the center third. You will not have the batting in the throat of your machine as you have cut it out. Turn around and quilt the right side of the quilt. Now, replace the cutaway batting. Whip stitch it exactly in the same place it was before you cut it away. Now you can quilt this third. Easy peasy!
    I have a frame so I don't do it this way but a friend of mine uses this method. Her quilting turns out so nice that in 2009 she entered a quilt at Paducah and won first place in her division! She quilted it on her regular Bernina and it was exquisite.

  21. #46
    FlamingoGal's Avatar
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    My main tip is that the larger the flat area in back of and beside the machine, and beside you, the easier you'll be able to control the quilt. If you don't have a table mounted machine, you can build up the area with plastic shoe boxes tape, and poster board. Gravity is your enemy and the flat surface supports the weight, making it easier to maneuver. Don't hunch yourself into a tight knot, stretch often, and BREATHE!!!

  22. #47
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    you ladies are all so wonderful. Thank you all so much. Penny

  23. #48
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    have fun and post a picture for us

  24. #49
    Senior Member TeresaT's Avatar
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    Hats off to all of you who do machine quilting. I tried it and I think I will stick with hand quilting, it is much eaiser.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ View Post
    9" of space is do-able. i think there are several members who successfully machine quilt on machines smaller than that. my machine quilting is still pretty awful but here are a few things i've figured out as i try to get better. they may not work for you, but they make a difference for me.

    1. i roll the part of the quilt that will go through the throat when i'm doing long straight lines. i prop the roll over my shoulder to keep the weight off the machine.

    2. if i need to work on an inner section and will need to turn the quilt while i'm "sewing", it's easier if i either scrunch or roll it into a circle around the section i want to quilt. (have you ever seen the paper pouches they use to oven-poach fish on a cooking show? like that.)

    3. i had my machine in the bottom right-hand corner of my table. i make sure the space all the way around the table is clear of chairs so that nothing interferes with the movement of the quilt.

    4. i try as hard as i can to make the quilt "float above the machine surface. the more weight resting on the machine bed, the more drag there is. if the quilt bunches up too much either behind the machine or to the left, i end up with a "traffic jam". i lose control of the movement and end up with stitches so teeny tiny they are nearly impossible to pick out if it goes too wrong to leave alone.

    5. i have not been able to master the skill of moving my quilt around by placing my hands flat on it and sliding it around. even with one of those silicon mats, i can't achieve smooth movement. also, my hands get tired very quickly. so, instead of torturing myself i hold the roll or scrunch up in my right hand while the left is either scrunching some of the excess or it's under the excess, lifting the quilt. (hard to describe.)

    6. once i've figured out the best way to hold the quilt, the next critical factor for me is the speed at which i sew. too fast and i not only can't control it but the stitches are waaaaaaaaay too small. too slow and the stitches are huge and the movement gets jerky. (curves become spikes. not attractive. :lol: )

    i'd like to believe that my machine quilting would be better if i had a 36" throat. i suspect, though, that it will only improve when i have mastered the art of controlling the sandwich as is passes through and around the machine. until then, i plan to always use threads that match the top and back. that way, the gafooples don't show as much. :lol:
    Thank you for this! Describing the details of what you do is very helpful--and the problems you have-- especially the teeny tiny stitches. I'm currently ripping those out of a table topper I've quilted (the quilting is awful!). I've realized one problem is that my machine is against the wall. Much better if the leading edge of whatever one is quilting can move forward off the edge of the machine cabinet surface.

    I so appreciate the experience of those who have gone before. It's invaluable!

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