Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 62

Thread: make your own Heavy Starch

  1. #21
    Senior Member Cosy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    571
    A bit of a de-rail:
    My grandmother would use a bit of bluing in the final rinse after shampooing her beautiful white hair, just enough to tint the water a very pale blue. the origin of the phrase, "blue haired ladies"
    And always in the rinse water of the "lily white" batch of laundry, a little darker blue. That stuff is potent, even more so than food coloring.
    And just for fun,
    "In a glass or plastic bowl, put some pieces of coal, coke (charcoal-like substance, charcoal, porous brick, tile, cement or sponge.
    Day 1: Over the base material, pour two tablespoons of water, two of table salt (iodized or plain) and two of Mrs. Stewart's Bluing.

    Day 2: Add two more tablespoons of salt.

    Day 3: Pour into the bottom of the bowl (not directly on the base material) two tablespoons each of salt, water, and Mrs. Stewart's Bluing, and then add a few drops of mercurochrome, vegetable coloring or ink to each piece.

    By this time a beautiful flower-like growth should have appeared. If all the conditions are not ideal, it may be necessary to add two tablespoons of household ammonia to aid the growth. A free circulation of air is necessary, and these formations will develop better where the air is dry.

    To keep it growing: Add more MSB, salt and water from time to time. It will "bloom" indefinitely into beautiful rosebuds, coral and crystal. Try it!" From Mrs. Stewarts Bluing website. for some dumb reason (the faulty finger/keyboard interface), I couldn't do a direct link.
    That bottle of blueing was a staple at our house,and I have made many a crystal garden. Wonder if I still have a bottle in the deep recesses? I should start another.
    and I have cooked many a kettle of Faultless starch for my dad's and brothers' dress shirts before the days of perma press.

  2. #22
    Dena789's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sunny Southern Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    151
    Blog Entries
    4
    Cosy - Thanks for the trip down memory lane! I remember growing crystals from coal but didn't remember how to do it so this is great. I'm going to see if I can round up the ingredients to start one to show my grand kids.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    western Ma
    Posts
    263
    Blog Entries
    1
    thank you for the info. Just ran out of starch.

  4. #24
    Junior Member SherryCat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    210
    If you store the starch in the frig, would that prevent the mold?

  5. #25
    Senior Member janell2009's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    420
    Remember the older "blue haired" ladies ... as you age you loose the ability to see the color blue, blue over rides yellow, which in the old days when water was bad etc, white haired ladies would develop a yellow cast, that is why they put blue in it. Would also work for dogs, horses, cows, any hairs you want the yellow neutralized. hehehehe

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    metuchen,nj
    Posts
    565
    Knew you could, but didn't know how. Thanks for the recipe.

  7. #27
    Senior Member jetmaio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Spring Hill, Florida
    Posts
    316
    wow thanks, am just in the process of spray starching my pieces. I wrote the recipe and will have it done shortly thanks to you.

    Funny this just brought to mind my aunt's curtain stretcher and her dipping her crochet bowls in sugar.

  8. #28
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,543
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Quote Originally Posted by clem55
    My mom always made laundry starch that way, and while I am not positive, I think she used to add a small piece of something called bluing. It made the whites and colors brighter. She made her own lye soap for laundry too!!
    yes...bluing...I am not sure if we can find that any more..but it sure worked great for the whites...
    i actually still have some and Linit starch, only use it when doing up the family Christening dress,slip,bonnett

  9. #29
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Petersburg, WV
    Posts
    1,495
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Quote Originally Posted by clem55
    My mom always made laundry starch that way, and while I am not positive, I think she used to add a small piece of something called bluing. It made the whites and colors brighter. She made her own lye soap for laundry too!!
    yes...bluing...I am not sure if we can find that any more..but it sure worked great for the whites...
    The bluing is still out there. I came across it about a year ago and got it.

  10. #30
    Senior Member jcrilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    458
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosy
    A bit of a de-rail:
    My grandmother would use a bit of bluing in the final rinse after shampooing her beautiful white hair, just enough to tint the water a very pale blue. the origin of the phrase, "blue haired ladies"
    And always in the rinse water of the "lily white" batch of laundry, a little darker blue. That stuff is potent, even more so than food coloring.
    And just for fun,
    "In a glass or plastic bowl, put some pieces of coal, coke (charcoal-like substance, charcoal, porous brick, tile, cement or sponge.
    Day 1: Over the base material, pour two tablespoons of water, two of table salt (iodized or plain) and two of Mrs. Stewart's Bluing.

    Day 2: Add two more tablespoons of salt.

    Day 3: Pour into the bottom of the bowl (not directly on the base material) two tablespoons each of salt, water, and Mrs. Stewart's Bluing, and then add a few drops of mercurochrome, vegetable coloring or ink to each piece.

    By this time a beautiful flower-like growth should have appeared. If all the conditions are not ideal, it may be necessary to add two tablespoons of household ammonia to aid the growth. A free circulation of air is necessary, and these formations will develop better where the air is dry.

    To keep it growing: Add more MSB, salt and water from time to time. It will "bloom" indefinitely into beautiful rosebuds, coral and crystal. Try it!" From Mrs. Stewarts Bluing website. for some dumb reason (the faulty finger/keyboard interface), I couldn't do a direct link.
    That bottle of blueing was a staple at our house,and I have made many a crystal garden. Wonder if I still have a bottle in the deep recesses? I should start another.
    and I have cooked many a kettle of Faultless starch for my dad's and brothers' dress shirts before the days of perma press.
    We always called this a "Depression Garden"

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.