Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: neck and shoulder pad

  1. #31
    Senior Member diamondee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    621
    Blog Entries
    1
    I use cracked corn that they use to feed animals, keep it in a zip-lock bag in freezer to be ready for unexpected bumps/aches. easily warmed in the microwave if heat is needed, just take out of the bag first. I also made removable flannel case/covers for them that I could just throw into the washing machine when needed. I have one that I heat up to use for my cold feet when I go to bed. (dog loves it too) It warms the bed up nicely in the winter. Common sense says do not make it HOT!
    ​We can't help everyone, But everyone can help someone.

  2. #32
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    15

    Revise the pattern!

    I designed one almost exactly like it and decided it was far too heavy for my taste. And like you, I decided it had too much filling anyway. So I redesigned it so it would take less filling, with the added benefit that the filling stayed distributed more evenly. I would post a pic, but I gave it to my mother and haven't made another one yet. I'll see if she can send me a pic I can post. Until then, I'll try to describe what I did.

    The first thing I did was trim off and round out the corners on both the back and front, but particularly the back. I cut a lot off the back corners! I discovered it didn't make a bit of difference in the effectiveness.

    The next thing I did was add what I called vertical seams. In the original version, there are only horizontal seams. On the back channels, I put in 3 vertical seams so there are 4 little pockets per horizontal row. I put an outside seam down the middle. Then I added about a quarter to a third cup of filling, then sewed an outside seam halfway to the edge to lock in that filling, which also created the next pocket. Put in the filling and sew the edge shut. Then do the other half. Do the same until you have all the filling in. Don't be afraid to shorten the width, either. Like I said, it will still be very effective. Use your judgment on how much filling to use. You DON'T have to put nearly as much as you think. Don't try to fill the pockets completely. It's just not necessary, and yes, it still works wonderfully.

    I fill mine with a mixture of deer corn and rice. The deer corn holds in heat a little longer but the rice tends to mold itself better to your curves. I've used deer corn, rice, all kinds of dried beans, dried lentils, dried peas, and such, all with success. Sometimes it's a matter of what's on sale and what I have on hand!

    update... okay, I found the pieces I had cut out for the next one I'll make. They're roughly 21 inches across by 24 in length. Here's a pic. It'll be much smaller than that once the filling is in.

    Good luck!

    Terri
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #33
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3,236
    I have made several pads like that; the rice is the lightest weight stuffing you can use except for oat or buckwheat hulls and I don't like the noise they make sloshing around. Use the rice; it's not that expensive and it lasts foreverl I don't see how you could get bugs when it is heated so often. Put it in a large zip bag to protect it if you must or drop it into a pillow case. It would seem that one heating would get rid of any eggs in the rice.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Bonnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    South Central Michigan
    Posts
    438
    The corn works great. I went to the elevator and bought shelled corn and it works for years and no it doesn't pop.

  5. #35
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    4,713
    such a brilliant idea to make one of these to use as a foot warmer. thank you!

  6. #36
    Junior Member Suziuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Happy Valley, South Australia
    Posts
    260
    Quote Originally Posted by Larue Bonnoni View Post
    I was at a craft show that was selling different sizes of these warming pads and I asked what he filled them with and it was crushed wheat I bought some at a bulk food store and made some warming pads . The wheat seemed to hold the heat longer (maybe my imagination)
    It is not your imagination, I make wheat bags for a physio which they on sell to their clients, one of the shapes I make is a smaller version of the heat pack pictured in this post. I use whole clean wheat purchased from a fodder store. Wheat contains a cellular structure that ideally provides an insulative quality that absorbs either heat or cold temperatures evenly. Always use a cotton fabric cover (pin whale cord better knows as corduroy works well), and if the wheat pack is to be used from the freezer (I make small palm sized packs from left over fabric that are great to freeze and use for bumps and scolds) it needs to be put in a plastic bag. If a wheat pack gets wet throw it out. Store any left over wheat in a sealed container to prevent weavels.

  7. #37
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sweet Home Alabama
    Posts
    3,151
    Thanks for all the info everyone. I've been thinking about a similar bag and have a better idea of what the different products do.

  8. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Ringgold, Virginia
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by 4EVERquilt View Post
    Made this at my quilt class last Thursday. The bigger part drapes over your neck and shoulders and the smaller two parts go in front laying on your chest. You heat it up in the microwave and it serves as a heating pad. Here is my problem...it if filled with almost 6lbs of white rice, well I have a real problem with that. Using food in it. I would appreciate any suggestions from you as to what else I could use in that would be safe in the microwave instead of using a food item. I could have fed my grandkids with that much rice over a period of 2 weeks. Help!!
    I used deer corn in mine-found it at wAL-MART IN THE HUNTING SECTION

  9. #39
    Super Member Wonnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,430
    Blog Entries
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by fayzer View Post
    Rice warming pads will sometimes cause infestation of pantry moths which are hard to get rid of. I got those an it took months to rid my house if them. You can use deer/squirrel corn ($5 at Walmart or order cherry pits for crafting online. The pits are clean, work really well and you can add fragrant oils such as lavender.
    Definitely true! We had a large bag of rice in the pantry and ended up with a gozillion of those pesky little pantry moths and like to never got rid of them.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Richmond, TX
    Posts
    411
    I made these years ago with crimped corn. When you use crimped corn it doesn't pop. Pop corn is actually a specific type of corn variety. That's why we have so few old maids in the bag. (I think long ago regular corn was used) Anyway, I don't think sand would heat up as nicely. Recently the quilters around here are using Walnut shells in their pincushions. It is ground down to a smaller pebbly size, and it sharpens the needles. You get it at the chain pet stores, I think it is bedding material. I think you could use this material. It wouldn't get pantry moths, I think it would heat up, and wouldn't be as heavy as sand. My neck warmer didn't have anywhere near that amount of rice/corn in it.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 3 4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.