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Thread: Need advise on cutting long pieces of material

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Need advise on cutting long pieces of material

    I am going to begin making a bridal quilt for my granddaughter that marries in May. (Getting a head start so won't be under a lot of pressure. LOL)

    It is the 'Country Bride Pattern', if you are familiar with it.

    My problem is that it's side borders are 2 cuts of 16 1/2 inches by 112 inches LOF. I have never cut that big of a piece before. I know I can fold it, but am so scared of cutting it with an elbow and ruining it. The only place I have to cut is on a table that is about 60-plus long and about 3 ft. wide.

    Any suggestions on how to do this? I'm going to get the material as soon as I get off the 'puter and am hoping someone has a solution.

    TIA

  2. #2
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    Are you piecing the borders or cutting a piece that is one long length of fabric? I have folded up to 4 layers and cut very carefully without problems, but 2 layers is much better. You would have to move your cutting mat as you went along and check your layers to be sure that they have not moved. It would almost be easier to cut 40 inch sections crosswise and sew them together. It may depend on the pattern in your fabric as to whether you would want to do that.
    Beth
    Beth in Maryland

  3. #3
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    If you cut the fabric while it is folded, press the folds flat before you cut. It helps prevent the curve that usually occurs when you cut folded fabric. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    I either rip it (although I know some cringe at the thought) or I cut the length of my ruler then carefully move the ruler and/or fabric and continue cutting till I have the length needed.

  5. #5
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    When I cut long borders, I mark it with a pencil and ruler then cut with the rotary cutter
    and ruler (of course).
    Sometimes I put one or two paper weights on the fabric so it doesn't slide too much.
    I don't like to fold the fabric as I'm afraid of the dreaded "v".

  6. #6
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy View Post
    When I cut long borders, I mark it with a pencil and ruler then cut with the rotary cutter
    and ruler (of course).
    Sometimes I put one or two paper weights on the fabric so it doesn't slide too much.
    I don't like to fold the fabric as I'm afraid of the dreaded "v".
    I have done this also. I lay it out on a long table, sometimes with hubby's help, and measure first, than cut moving the ruler along as I go, I just move the ruler 1/2 way at a time which helps keep me lined up with the already cut edge. Clear as Mud??
    Have a great day sewing and remember to "not sweat the small stuff"!!



  7. #7
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    I am of the school that rips. Cutting borders that long usually doesn't turn out well. It is a good idea to carefully press and starch the fabric before ripping that long a piece as the tearing distorts the fabric. After it is ripped press it again. I worked for almost two years for a shop that did custom dressmaking and alterations. Straight of grain is a real deal breaker. If you ever owned a garment that just never hung right it is because it was not cut on the straight of grain. The only other thing you can do is pull a thread and carefully cut where the thread was removed from the fabric. Good luck.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpspeedy2 View Post
    I am of the school that rips. Cutting borders that long usually doesn't turn out well. It is a good idea to carefully press and starch the fabric before ripping that long a piece as the tearing distorts the fabric. After it is ripped press it again. I worked for almost two years for a shop that did custom dressmaking and alterations. Straight of grain is a real deal breaker. If you ever owned a garment that just never hung right it is because it was not cut on the straight of grain. The only other thing you can do is pull a thread and carefully cut where the thread was removed from the fabric. Good luck.
    Another ripper here under those conditions! I'd also rip an inch or so wider if possible just to be able to rid myself of the distortions. This can be done by pulling those outer most threads on either/both sides. A little tedious but definitely have straight grain when you're done.

  9. #9
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    I say rip it too! Much faster--more accurate.
    Bernie

  10. #10
    Senior Member AudreyB's Avatar
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    I'd rip it, too, but I'd add an inch to the size being ripped. Then, after pressing, I'd cut a half inch off each edge to give a sharp cut and to remove some of the stretched edge.
    AudreyB
    Those who sleep under quilts are covered with love.

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