Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Need help with not so good fabric.

  1. #1
    Senior Member sewellie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern Idaho
    Posts
    683
    Blog Entries
    2

    Need help with not so good fabric.

    I recently lost a friend who meant a lot to me. She had 5 grown children, 3 boys and 2 girls. The one girl thought it would be great to take their mother's shirts and make a quilt. Well, a lady made 3 quilts and didn't want to make any more and that left 2 boys without. I volunteered to take on the project. What was I thinking. I thought throws would be a better choice than a quilt. I do not have a lot of shirts and will fill in with my own fabrics.

    The shirts have been well worn and washed. Mostly they are cotton, but not crisp and new. So my question is, how can I make this flimsy fabric easier to work with and that would make the throws last a long time. To me it's a labor of love for my friend and her family, so it's very important to me to do the best that I can.

    Thanks for any help you can give me.

    Ellie
    sewellie

  2. #2
    QM
    QM is online now
    Super Member QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    6,712
    Lots of sizing. If it is not good enough for that, use steam a seam or other iron on.

  3. #3
    Senior Member quiltingme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    599
    Could you fuse them to a cotton base fabric to make them last?

  4. #4
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    6,872
    Blog Entries
    1
    I agree. Starch or sizing -- your choice. If the fabric is seriously worn, you might use a light weight fusible interfacing to help it out. I did that on some pieces in a quilt my great grandma made in order to hold it together. It looks fine from the front.

  5. #5
    Junior Member judys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Northwest WI
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter View Post
    I agree. Starch or sizing -- your choice. If the fabric is seriously worn, you might use a light weight fusible interfacing to help it out. I did that on some pieces in a quilt my great grandma made in order to hold it together. It looks fine from the front.
    I'd use the lightest weight fusible interfacing. The sizing would wash out the first time it is washed. Thanks for doing this for your friend.

  6. #6
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,488
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would probably use fusible nylon tricot as a stabilizer for the weak shirt fabrics. It adds a little heft to the fabric, but is not stiff. Here is a link:
    http://www.joann.com/pellon-easy-kni...5yds/prd14641/

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    4,283
    I agree with this approach. Sizing and starch are only helpful when putting the quilt together, and sometimes that doesn't help, either.

    Fusible interfacing will give the fabrics more body and help them last longer.

  8. #8
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    5,420
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter View Post
    I agree. Starch or sizing -- your choice. If the fabric is seriously worn, you might use a light weight fusible interfacing to help it out. I did that on some pieces in a quilt my great grandma made in order to hold it together. It looks fine from the front.
    Pellon makes a good fusible interfacing that comes in lightweight and featherweight. It gives the fabric a good hand and is easily quilted. (I do machine quilting so I wouldn't know about hand quilting these) IMHO, sizing or starch would make the fabric easy to work with, but the interfacing would be better than starch because it won't be washed out. I commend you on your service to these people.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  9. #9
    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Posts
    1,981
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would also use the nylon tricot interfacing line Prism99 suggested. It tends to hold together through multiple launderings better than other non-woven lightweight interfaceings.
    Wendy

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    howell, Mi
    Posts
    1,827
    A light weight iron on interfacing would be a good choice. Starch or sizing will wash out so would not be the support that the worn fabrics need. That is very nice of you to do this for the boys. I have a feeling that the other quilter dropped out of the project because the worn clothing was hard to work with.
    Sue

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.