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Thread: Need Opinions on Machine Quilting Costs!!

  1. #1

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    I know that I am a 'thrifty' quilter..but, I just dropped off a quilt to a quilter for a friend..and, I don't know the exact size but, it is no bigger then a twin sized quilt....the gal is charging a total of $90 to 'stipple' it for her and that was including charges for the 'thread' and so many bobbins...and, she had to supply the 'batting'...for the $90 did not include the batting!!! Have I knocked myself in the head??Is this normal? Is machine quilters that do just stippling cost that much?? I just have to know for I have been sick for her for the cost and keeping my mouth shut..but, know I won't seek out a machine quilter over this, I'll have to just keep plugging along w/my baby steps of doing this! Skeat........who doesn't mean to insult anyone out there trying to make a living and I am asking for I just 'don't know' what is norm!All I can think of is how much more fabric I would have bought instead! Please give an opinion!!

  2. #2
    Super Member MaryStoaks's Avatar
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    I have a longarm for my own use, I don't do other people's quilts. I think the $90 price is about right, considering the time and effort involved in putting a quilt on the frame, stippeling a quilt, the costs of materials, her time planning with the customer etc. I do my own because I know what it costs to have them done.
    When you pay a profesional quilter you also pay for their skill and the use of the very expensive quilting machine and tools they use. Another thing most people don't give a thought to is the space the longarm machine takes in the quilter's home/studio, these machines are huge. It's not cheap!
    Mary

  3. #3
    Super Member beachlady's Avatar
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    I think that sounds reasonable. Around here it would be more.

  4. #4
    Cookn's Avatar
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    Most professional longarm quilters charge by the sq. inch. Depending on competition in your area it varies by region of the US. Base prices can range from $.01 to $.03 per sq. inch and then go upward from there. Charges for thread and bobbins are normal charges along with any other charges for any services such as suppling batting, any repairs the have to made to your friends quilt, binding if asked for. Quilting charge alone for a quilt say 80"X100" at $.01 per square inch would be $80.00 not including supplies or any additional services, and $.01 is a really good rate and there would have to be a lot of competition in your area for a rate that low.

  5. #5
    Roben's Avatar
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    Skeat, that sounds close. Around here quilters charge between .0125 - .015 per inch; thread (especially variegated or specialty thread), batting, and sewing on the binding are all extra.

    Most will provide a price listing to help you figure out how much a particular quilt will cost, and it should list out any charges that are extras. A twin size is generally 60" x 90", but you should always measure the one you're sending so that you get a good idea ahead of time how much it will cost.

    Don't let one experience guide you; if she is much higher or charges a lot of extras, you may find someone else who doesn't :wink:

  6. #6

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    Most of the people I know who do basic quilting charge $0.02 per inch. I did have one lady who did it for less, but I must confess that I was not impressed with the quality of her work. Also, she would include the cost of the batting for that price, but it was a too-puffy poly batt and I didn't want that, so I provided my own. The important thing is to find a good quilter.

  7. #7

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    I have to admit I am 'shocked' by the price! I'm sure my gaping open mouth gave that thought away too:)The gal does beautiful work for I have seen it so that won't be a problem for my friend. There was no work for the prep of the quilt, it was pressed and ready and looked sharp. Also, she is on a gracie frame system. I'm sure there is much time involved as far as hooking the quilt up for I do it the old fashioned way and run it thru my machine...not have the machine guide easy (I wish for!) Her price was just stippling...no binding and no batting...just the price to stipple it w/thread figured in. I guess I am just a naive quilter here!! I honestly had no idea what others charged for I've done my own after paying for 3done...been awhile but, didn't seem high at the time. I just wanted to put my stash in fabrics instead. Guess as our economy goes and we are counting all of our fat quarters, I'm wondering if someone's time becomes out of reach for too many? Glad I said nothing!:)LOL Thanks for the input....hope there is more coming:0)Skeat

  8. #8
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    That prices seems a little high for my area especially with just stippling.... :oops:

  9. #9
    BlueChicken's Avatar
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    Think of it in relative terms too....

    how much would you spend on a night out? A dinner for two in a top restaurant? On clothes? Furnishings for your house?

    I think people sometimes get things a bit skewed. My partner is a tradesman, and he will often get people complaining over a bill of say $120 for a window. He points out that you can spend more than that on a dinner for two at a top restaurant here, and it's one night then it's over. A window is something in your house for a long time.

    Same with a quilt... if you want it done professionally it's because you want the best for that top, you want it to last a long time. So you pay for it. :-)


  10. #10
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    How many dollars per hour makes professional quilting worthwhile?

    Based on what I've heard, it takes 4 or 5 hours to load a twin-sized quilt on a frame and stipple quilt. At $90 for the quilt, that would pay about $20 per hour. Around here, people pay that much per hour for cleaning, and cleaning requires much less skill and much less in the way of equipment investment.

    Sometimes when I add up how much a quilt costs just for the fabric (top and backing) and batting, I'm shocked!

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