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Thread: Older Viking Sewing Machine - Apparently Not

  1. #1
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    The other day I started a thread about how I was offered an
    older Viking sewing machine. Well, I picked it up and brought it home and started researching my model and serial numbers only to find out it is not a Viking machine. :cry: (even though it says Viking on the front).
    The machine says Domestic on the back. So, I did some online digging around and found out I have a Domestic Brand machine, but the serial# is White, but I found the manual for it from Singer. (model#1665, serial #7996)
    Now I am thoroughly confused as to what kind of machine I really have. And I still can't find out how old it is.
    Well, it is metal and well-built, but came with no extras.
    Did I get a good machine? At this point, I am so confused as to what I've ended up with. Can anybody shed any light? Thank you!

  2. #2
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    White is owned by Viking...if that helps..
    .and since Singer, Viking and Pfaff are all owned by the same company...I would guess that you could get the book from Singer.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Sewing Joe's Avatar
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    I believe Viking was a brand name of Eaton's Department Store in Canada (like Kenmore is to Sears), so it's possible it's a badged machine sold by Eaton's as opposed to a Husqvarna Viking machine. There was a relationship between White and Domestic, and both made good machines.

  4. #4
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    wow that is all very interesting

  5. #5
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    That does make sense to me. So, IYHO, do you think it would be a good, solid machine -worth getting tuned up???
    Thanks for the info by the way...


    Quote Originally Posted by Sewing Joe
    I believe Viking was a brand name of Eaton's Department Store in Canada (like Kenmore is to Sears), so it's possible it's a badged machine sold by Eaton's as opposed to a Husqvarna Viking machine. There was a relationship between White and Domestic, and both made good machines.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Sewing Joe's Avatar
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    I'm a bad one to ask. I think petty much all older machines are worth putting in working order. Typically they need little more than a good lubrication job.

  7. #7
    Member Bonnie Zink's Avatar
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    This is an interesting thread. I'm looking for a bobbin case for this old Viking. I believe it to be an Eaton's (Canadian department store) machine. Does anyone have any information that can help me locate a bobbin case and extra bobbins? Here is a photo of his charming self and a photo from the original manual. The manual says he is a Viking series 825 and his serial number is 679-5115 C2 (the 2 is smaller and inside the C). Thank you in advance for any information you can provide. Name:  Basil.jpg
Views: 336
Size:  92.8 KBName:  Basil_Manual.jpg
Views: 331
Size:  6.8 KB
    Happy stitching!
    BZ

  8. #8
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    This machine looks identical to my mother's 1930 Franklin Delux rotary model 117.851 sold by Sears as part of the Kenmore line. The stitch regulator, tensioner, and bobbin winder are all identical. There are other very similar machines,the White rotary 77 and the Domestic 153. When I was looking for Singer parts, I found several web sites that alsohad parts for the White manufactured machines. There are older manuals on the web and the one from 1913 showsindex number 744 in the parts diagram as the bobbin. The bobbins are an inch in diameter and 11/32 of an inch thick.For extra feet, you need the White style with the horizontal slot in the top that is held by the knurled knob. Singer,Brother or Pfaff feet will not work. There are ruffler and button-hole attachments available for it. Also hemmer feet andan adjustable zipper foot. The easiest way to thread it is to put the spool on with your right hand, take the thread in your left and go thru the slot in the upper thread guide, down to loop around the tensioner, back up the the slot thatleads to the hole in the take-up arm and back to the needle. It can be done in one continuous motion with a little practice.I learned to sew on this type of machine, and it survived that experience and is still going strong. It feeds heavy cloth very well and is very forgiving on upper thread tension.

  9. #9
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    Nice machine - you should post over on the Vintage Machine section, lots of people over there would enjoy seeing it. - And give you lots of advice about it if you want LOL!

    Like rudy said, this machine is made by White - it will take the same White bobbins and top clamp feet as other Whites made before manufacturing when overseas.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  10. #10
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    In 1959, my husband bought me a Domestic machine at Eatons in Canada. It was green & a kind of bronze color. It was the best machine I ever had. But you know how it is , you are shown a fancier machine & you fall for it. I sold it, & I've never seen one like it after that.My machine came from Eatons in Saskatoon , Sk. Canada.I would love to see one again.It was a real work horse. <<>>
    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade View Post
    The other day I started a thread about how I was offered an
    older Viking sewing machine. Well, I picked it up and brought it home and started researching my model and serial numbers only to find out it is not a Viking machine. :cry: (even though it says Viking on the front).
    The machine says Domestic on the back. So, I did some online digging around and found out I have a Domestic Brand machine, but the serial# is White, but I found the manual for it from Singer. (model#1665, serial #7996)
    Now I am thoroughly confused as to what kind of machine I really have. And I still can't find out how old it is.
    Well, it is metal and well-built, but came with no extras.
    Did I get a good machine? At this point, I am so confused as to what I've ended up with. Can anybody shed any light? Thank you!

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