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Thread: Question re selling quilts

  1. #1
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    Question re selling quilts

    I know this is a difficult question but I am wondering if anyone could give me parameters as to how to price a quilted throw or twin size quilt that someone has asked me to make for them. The pattern would not be complex. Help, please.

    ronee
    Ronee

  2. #2
    Senior Member kountrykreation's Avatar
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    That's a hard one. I have to give all my quilts away, because when I price them, they're always over priced! Naw, just kidding. Add your labor cost to the materials cost, and add profit, or price them according to your area and what the market will allow? My last suggestion would be to peruse ebay and/or etsy and compare with their prices? Sorry, just too many variables involved.

  3. #3
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Well, there are a LOT of parameters, a lot of it depends on the difficulty of the quilt, your relationship with the person, how much fabric it will take, how much time it will take, your level of experience, etc.

    I had a casual acquaintance ask me once to copy a quilt that her son had owned for over 20 years. We could not find a pattern for it. I gave her a written estimate that included time AND materials: how long it would take me to draw up a pattern, how much fabric it would require, and how much time it would take me for each step; cutting applique, cutting borders, stitching the applique, quilting, etc. She wasn't happy with it because she assumed I would simply use fabric from my stash and not charge her for drawing up the pattern. Ha - I don't THINK so.

    Anyway - I would charge the true cost of every material used, including batting, backing, and binding, and very carefully take into account how much time you will invest in this project, and charge an hourly rate commiserate with your experience.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Handcraftsbyjen's Avatar
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    I've gone with $25 a linear foot.

  5. #5
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    Supplies alone for a twin usually run me over $200. If I sold one I don't think I would be able to do it for less than $400 if I wanted to be compensated at all for my time (much less make a profit over that.)

    Hence, I refuse to sell them.

  6. #6
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    Figure out how long it will take you to make it (OVER-estimate) and how much you would like to make per hour. Add the costs of materials. Make sure you and the buyer are clear on the price BEFORE you start.

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    On another thread I thought the best suggestion was to have the person provide the fabrics and batting according to your yardage requirements, charge what a LA does to quilt that size plus what you want for labor to make the top. It cuts down down on the "shock value". the store sets the price for the fabric. The prevelant going LA rates set your price for quilting. All you set individually is your labor for cutting and piecing the top. That's the only part of the price of the quilt that could be argued about with you.
    Last edited by TanyaL; 06-19-2012 at 10:21 AM.

  8. #8
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TanyaL View Post
    On another thread I thought the best suggestion was to have the person provide the fabrics and batting according to your yardage requirements, charge what a LA does to quilt that size plus what you want for labor to make the top. It cuts down down on the "shock value". the store sets the price for the fabric. The prevelant going LA rates set your price for quilting. All you set individually is your labor for cutting and piecing the top. That's the only part of the price of the quilt that could be argued about with you.
    Great idea... I love this calculating..

  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    The first thing to decide is whether you want to make the quilt at all, and if not, just say so and be done with it. If you would like to make it, then get a rough estimate of how much the materials would cost, and don't forget batting and thread, and any special tools you need for the quilt. Just telling the person how much the materials will cost will probably be enough to stop the project. But if they persist, then figure out how much you would be happy with as a commission for making the quilt. In some cases, I wouldn't charge anything for my labor, because I would enjoy making the quilt so much and would be honored to be asked. In other cases I would want a hefty sum. I would keep in mind how long it would take to make it, but I wouldn't be comparing it to an hourly wage. Instead I would ask myself "would I be happy with that amount?" Of course I'm retired and I have the time to quilt. This may not be your situation. If you're sending the quilt out to be longarmed then of course that cost is separate, but if you're doing it yourself you honestly can't charge as much as a professional longarmer unless your work is comparable.

  10. #10
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    some people go with cost X 3- meaning figure the patterns, fabrics, thread, batting, everything you need to make the quilt multiply this amount by 3- that gives a place to start- then you can look at that amount & decide if you feel it is too much & you could charge less- or if you think you should get a bit more than that- so that's kind of the middle ground & can be adjusted up or down from there.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

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