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Thread: questions on using a dsm with a hinty frame.

  1. #1
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    questions on using a dsm with a hinty frame.

    i finally got the hinty set up. actually, the dh did . anyway...i have some questions...

    the hand control--is there a way of really adjusting it? can't get it adjusted to "hammer down" on teh pedal, so the machine stitches very slowly. So, i'm using the foot pedal on the floor. does anyone have ingenious methods?


    I am using my viking 350. (and thinking about chasing down a singer 201). i am having major tension issues. i attribute at least some of that to getting my speed and the sewing machine speed regulated to each other. but, what do i do? i seem to have loose tension on top and loops of the upper thread on the backing. Any help is appreciated!

    also we pinned the backing, then the batting and the top. i've seen people on you tube just "float" the batting and the top...opinions?

    thank you so much!

    Betsey

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    How tight is your quilt rolled? It should not be drum tight, but actually quite loose. The rule of thumb is to be able to grab a finger that is pushed up from below.

    You may need to adjust your tensions for frame quilting. Basically you want to loosen the bobbin tension as much as possible, then adjust the top tension. Although the following Youtube video is for longarms, it seems to apply to any machine used on a frame:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1mRh...664A7&index=13

    I attach the backing top and bottom, then lay the batting on the backing and sew across the top of the batting using a "channel lock". This basically means the carriage does not move forwards or backwards so you get a straight line. I do this on my Hinty by using a large black binder clip behind just one of the bearings on the carriage. If I can find the website with a picture of this, I will post it. Anyway, this is how I "float" the batting, as the batting bottom is not attached to anything.

    Floating the top works in the same way. You stitch it to the batting/backing using a channel lock. (The purpose of the channel lock is to make sure you get a straight line.) To fully float the top, you do not attach the bottom to anything.

    I personally had a disaster on my hands when I did a full float of the top. I do the above, but attach the bottom to one of the rails.

    I absolutely could not stand to do all that pinning. I purchased long zippers on Amazon (the seller is on eBay also) and now zip my quilts on and off the frame. Found a couple of tutorials online that showed how to sew zippers to the leaders.

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    A 201 has a drop in, horizontal bobbin. You may like the 15 better as it has less tension issues. Both of these machines have small throats for frames, however.

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    I do it like Prism, but I have velcro on my poles and leaders... easy on, easy off
    Nancy in western NY
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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I have a Singer 201, stretched to 18", on my Hint frame. It has a dial mounted to the top of the machine to adjust the speed. I've heard of people using dimmer switches to control speed, but I'd speak to the machine's manufacturer about that first, especially if your machine is digital. And have an electrician do the installation. You do not want to mess with any wiring.

    Velcro is a good way to go. I just purchased some Red Snappers used from a friend, have yet to try them out. There are Mondo Clips, also. Pinning just seems archaic to me now, lol.

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    thank you everyone for your help!

    with the velcro...is the leader connected to the frame with velcro, and then you just basted the backing to the leader and velcro it to the pole? i apologize for being so dense!

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Yes, you have one half of the velcro glued to the rollers, and the other half of the velcro is sewn to the leader. You then attach your quilt to the leader in whatever method you prefer - pinning, zipper, mondo clips or red snappers, etc.

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    Thank you Peggi! now i have a clearer understanding of what is going on! sometimes i am so blonde. of course, now i need to go discover what mondo clips and red snappers are!

    also, with gluing to the rollers. do the self adhesive velcro product work, or do i need to glue with something more?

  9. #9
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I would use something stronger than the adhesive they have on the back of those velcro strips. Gorilla Glue, maybe? My husband has a gallon jug of it in the garage, which is why it popped into my head, lol.

    You should be able to find videos on YouTube of both, the Red Snappers and Mondo Clips, and also another one called Leader Grips. I've not seen Leader Grips in person, but my understanding is they are very similar to Red Snappers.

    Red Snappers are a system of attaching your quilt to the leaders. You sew a casing in your leader. The inner part of the Red Snapper, which is a thin rod, goes into the casing. The outer part of the Red Snapper is a long, C-shaped pole that snaps onto the inner rod. So, you lay your top over the casing with the rod, then snap the outer sections of the snappers onto the rod. It holds your quilt onto the leader without pins or zippers.

    Some quilters have struggled with Red Snappers because they find the outer section can be stiff and difficult to snap on. I have a couple of friends who have discovered Mondo Clips, which I have yet to see, but I've been told they're easier to use and less expensive.

    It may take you a bit of time to figure out which system you like best. Hope this helps, and good luck!

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    thank you Peggi! (i'm sorry, i just can't call someone peckish...)

    i have to admit this...i am terrified of changing that bobbin tension . but I will! today i'm stopping by joanne's to buy some cheap muslin to practice more on, and i am going to try "floating" the batting and the top on the frame. Will also change the bobbin tension at that point as well....

    and i'm on the hunt for a reasonably priced 201....

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