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Thread: Rotary cutters

  1. #1
    Senior Member Normabeth's Avatar
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    Rotary cutters

    Hi, I must have 10 rotary cutters with dull blades in them. I purchase the electric blade sharpener, but the sharpness only lasts for one cutting. Are there better blades out there? Or maybe, what is the best rotary cutter you have every used? I recently read a post that this women has had the same rotary cutter for years and never changed the blade, I figure that she doesn't cut much. I even purchased the AccuGo cutter for the 5" squares, but it doesn't cut even. I am bad at cutting. my hand always moves as I walk up the ruler and rely on this tool (rotary cutter) to make a clean cut the first time. I usually only cut through 2 layers at a time - Is there help for me? NormaBeth
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  2. #2
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    If your hand moves when you are using the cutter, then bad cuts are probably not the fault of the cutter, but of your hand movement. Have you analyzed why your hand moves? How far can you push the cutter before your hand moves incorrectly? For starters I would tape my single fabric to my cutting mat so that it couldn't move. Then when my ruler was in position I would tape it down so it couldn't move. Then I would push my cutter however far I could before my hand moved incorrectly. At that point I would stop, rest my hand muscles, change the position of the arm if necessary - all without lifting my cutter from the fabric if possible- then cut however farther I could before I knew my hand would move incorrectly again. This sounds like a lot of pain-in-the-a-- prevention, but after awhile you should be able to anticipate when you need to rest or reposition your hand and not have to secure your fabric and ruler. You should have the fine cutting results with your cutter blades that the rest of us do. I think it is learning the correct hand motion and pressure, not thinking you are the victim of cutting voodoo. Too much pressure will make that cutter not work right, wobbling your hand will not give you straight cuts, etc. Tense muscles do not work well, etc. Good luck on analyzing where your problem actually lies.

  3. #3
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    You sound like me. My hand always seems to move when I am cutting a long piece. First of all, the rotary cutters. I recently purchased a Fiskar Titanium cutter. It is great! Cuts much more smoothly and the pressure can be adjusted. I can cut through many more layers without having to go back over it so many times that I then have frayed edges! I got it at Joann's with a coupon. It was only a dollar more than the regular rotary cutter and I recommend it highly. The next issue, I was cutting fabric at my mentor's house last week and noticed nothing moves with her rulers. She has these sticky dots she buys and puts on the back (downside) of her rulers. They hold very well and no movement for me. I came home and put "double sided scotch tape" on my rulers and now nothing is moving. Try that and see how it works and good luck.

  4. #4
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    try blades from Harbor Freight. Inexpensive and change the blade when it gets dull. Also pick up one of the books on Rotary Cutting - look at the library. They usually discuss issues such as those you have If you have a LQS, check to see if they have a class on rotary cutting. There is a skil to it which a class might help.
    And in my opinion the electric sharpeners don't work as advertised.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    It seems some blades last forever and some not very long. I have a fiskar cutter and blades .
    Another Phyllis
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  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Titanium blades will last longer. Get rid of those old blades, you may find it's a LOT easier and you'll make less mistakes when you use a sharp blade.

  7. #7
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    I too have problems with my hands. Years ago I bought the Alto's QuiltCut2 and it is terrific! It (1) holds the fabric secure, (2) I only need one pressure point to hold the cutting edge in place, and at times it is my palm rather than my fingers, (3) it stores easily, even though I usually have mine out, and (4) it doesn't matter how much my hands tremor or anything else and I still get a precise cut.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  8. #8
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    If you have issues with arthritis in your hands or wrist, I reccommend the Martelli rotary cutter. I find it easier to grip and control. When I use that one I am much less apt to stray on the cutting side. I tip the cutter ever so slightly toward the ruler and that helps to keep me from flying off the wrong way!.

    I wind up holding the ruler down with my whole arm to keep it from wobbling around - which I know is not the smartest or most efficient. I saw a ruler here the other day which I can't remember the name of but it had a wodden handle on the ruler. That looked like it might help me hold the ruler straight!

  9. #9
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    For longer cuts you might also want to look at one of the O'Lipfa rulers. tried to find a link with one in action, but couldn't. Basically, there is a iip on the bottom of the ruler which you let it lap over the edge of the cutting mat. This keeps the ruler straight and secure as you cut.
    With any ruler, you need to add something to the bottom to keep it from sliding. There are many products on the market for this purpose.


    http://www.amazon.com/OLipfa-18-Inch...lip+edge+ruler
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  10. #10
    Senior Member hheelleenn's Avatar
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    I recently got a martelli.and it makes a diffrence for me. I am disabled with m.s , in a wheelchair and only have use of my left side. I also use a quilt cut but 1 and it helps. I also weigh down the ruler with an old iron (they're heavier) with the cord cut off.

    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    if you have issues with arthritis in your hands or wrist, i reccommend the martelli rotary cutter. I find it easier to grip and control. When i use that one i am much less apt to stray on the cutting side. I tip the cutter ever so slightly toward the ruler and that helps to keep me from flying off the wrong way!.

    I wind up holding the ruler down with my whole arm to keep it from wobbling around - which i know is not the smartest or most efficient. I saw a ruler here the other day which i can't remember the name of but it had a wodden handle on the ruler. That looked like it might help me hold the ruler straight!

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