Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 42

Thread: Rotary cutters

  1. #1
    Super Member Normabeth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    1,010

    Rotary cutters

    Hi, I must have 10 rotary cutters with dull blades in them. I purchase the electric blade sharpener, but the sharpness only lasts for one cutting. Are there better blades out there? Or maybe, what is the best rotary cutter you have every used? I recently read a post that this women has had the same rotary cutter for years and never changed the blade, I figure that she doesn't cut much. I even purchased the AccuGo cutter for the 5" squares, but it doesn't cut even. I am bad at cutting. my hand always moves as I walk up the ruler and rely on this tool (rotary cutter) to make a clean cut the first time. I usually only cut through 2 layers at a time - Is there help for me? NormaBeth
    Be kinder than is necessary because everyone you meet is
    fighting some kind of battle

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bosque County, Texas
    Posts
    3,028
    If your hand moves when you are using the cutter, then bad cuts are probably not the fault of the cutter, but of your hand movement. Have you analyzed why your hand moves? How far can you push the cutter before your hand moves incorrectly? For starters I would tape my single fabric to my cutting mat so that it couldn't move. Then when my ruler was in position I would tape it down so it couldn't move. Then I would push my cutter however far I could before my hand moved incorrectly. At that point I would stop, rest my hand muscles, change the position of the arm if necessary - all without lifting my cutter from the fabric if possible- then cut however farther I could before I knew my hand would move incorrectly again. This sounds like a lot of pain-in-the-a-- prevention, but after awhile you should be able to anticipate when you need to rest or reposition your hand and not have to secure your fabric and ruler. You should have the fine cutting results with your cutter blades that the rest of us do. I think it is learning the correct hand motion and pressure, not thinking you are the victim of cutting voodoo. Too much pressure will make that cutter not work right, wobbling your hand will not give you straight cuts, etc. Tense muscles do not work well, etc. Good luck on analyzing where your problem actually lies.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Delaware County, SW of Phila.
    Posts
    605
    You sound like me. My hand always seems to move when I am cutting a long piece. First of all, the rotary cutters. I recently purchased a Fiskar Titanium cutter. It is great! Cuts much more smoothly and the pressure can be adjusted. I can cut through many more layers without having to go back over it so many times that I then have frayed edges! I got it at Joann's with a coupon. It was only a dollar more than the regular rotary cutter and I recommend it highly. The next issue, I was cutting fabric at my mentor's house last week and noticed nothing moves with her rulers. She has these sticky dots she buys and puts on the back (downside) of her rulers. They hold very well and no movement for me. I came home and put "double sided scotch tape" on my rulers and now nothing is moving. Try that and see how it works and good luck.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    try blades from Harbor Freight. Inexpensive and change the blade when it gets dull. Also pick up one of the books on Rotary Cutting - look at the library. They usually discuss issues such as those you have If you have a LQS, check to see if they have a class on rotary cutting. There is a skil to it which a class might help.
    And in my opinion the electric sharpeners don't work as advertised.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,362
    It seems some blades last forever and some not very long. I have a fiskar cutter and blades .
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    6,109
    Blog Entries
    1
    Titanium blades will last longer. Get rid of those old blades, you may find it's a LOT easier and you'll make less mistakes when you use a sharp blade.

  7. #7
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,889
    I too have problems with my hands. Years ago I bought the Alto's QuiltCut2 and it is terrific! It (1) holds the fabric secure, (2) I only need one pressure point to hold the cutting edge in place, and at times it is my palm rather than my fingers, (3) it stores easily, even though I usually have mine out, and (4) it doesn't matter how much my hands tremor or anything else and I still get a precise cut.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeast Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,067
    If you have issues with arthritis in your hands or wrist, I reccommend the Martelli rotary cutter. I find it easier to grip and control. When I use that one I am much less apt to stray on the cutting side. I tip the cutter ever so slightly toward the ruler and that helps to keep me from flying off the wrong way!.

    I wind up holding the ruler down with my whole arm to keep it from wobbling around - which I know is not the smartest or most efficient. I saw a ruler here the other day which I can't remember the name of but it had a wodden handle on the ruler. That looked like it might help me hold the ruler straight!

  9. #9
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,460
    Blog Entries
    2
    For longer cuts you might also want to look at one of the O'Lipfa rulers. tried to find a link with one in action, but couldn't. Basically, there is a iip on the bottom of the ruler which you let it lap over the edge of the cutting mat. This keeps the ruler straight and secure as you cut.
    With any ruler, you need to add something to the bottom to keep it from sliding. There are many products on the market for this purpose.


    http://www.amazon.com/OLipfa-18-Inch...lip+edge+ruler
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  10. #10
    Senior Member hheelleenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Port Saint Lucie, Florida
    Posts
    421
    I recently got a martelli.and it makes a diffrence for me. I am disabled with m.s , in a wheelchair and only have use of my left side. I also use a quilt cut but 1 and it helps. I also weigh down the ruler with an old iron (they're heavier) with the cord cut off.

    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    if you have issues with arthritis in your hands or wrist, i reccommend the martelli rotary cutter. I find it easier to grip and control. When i use that one i am much less apt to stray on the cutting side. I tip the cutter ever so slightly toward the ruler and that helps to keep me from flying off the wrong way!.

    I wind up holding the ruler down with my whole arm to keep it from wobbling around - which i know is not the smartest or most efficient. I saw a ruler here the other day which i can't remember the name of but it had a wodden handle on the ruler. That looked like it might help me hold the ruler straight!

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thornton, Colorado
    Posts
    943
    One possible source of your rotary blade problems may be your cutting mat. Some mats are rough, something like the white mats Joann Fabrics sells. They actually wear out the blades faster. The smoother the mat is, there is less wear and tear on the blades.

  12. #12
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I disagree about the mats. A hard surface mat, the blade rolls on top of it, a soft self healing mat the blade cuts into the mat. I worked in a field where cutting mats were used and they were always hard surfaced. The blades were too expensive to replace and couldn't be resharpened except for scheduled maintenance. A blade should last you a long time if you don't nick it. I have a manual sharpener and I sharpen a sharp blade. I don't wait for it to get dull. If you have the electric sharpener then use it on the sharp blade before you start cutting. If you can, find a quilt shop or guild close to you and let other quilters show you how to use a rotary cutter to get straight cuts.
    Got fabric?

  13. #13
    Super Member patski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    1,970
    Blog Entries
    9
    try using a narrower ruler,if you have small hands it will make it easier. I also have the clear plastic on the backs of my rulers so they don't slip. I buy blades on ebay, usually the olfa brand
    Patski
    always learning

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    722
    Are you cutting from the front to the back? are you cutting across your body? Are you using a cutting mat? I was talking to a lady today and she was using a piece of gyproc (sheetrock) to cut on...not so good for the cutter. Why are you changing the cutter, when you can just change the blades. I saw a video, not too long ago, where the quilter was using the hand sharpener and she sprayed the sharpener paper with water before turning the blade on it and she had been using the same blade for months.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anniston,Al.
    Posts
    17
    the little dots sorta like sandpaper on your ruler will keep your ruler from sliding and therefore help you cut a stright er line . It sure helped me

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,807
    Blog Entries
    1
    I use the self-healing Olfa mats. I have had a large one for a couple of years. I clean it often with a soft brush to remove dust, lint and debris and have soaked it a few times. I recently purchased another Olfa mat and butted them up to each other on my long counter. When cutting a fairly long piece of fabric, I noticed my rarely used blade had 'skip' sections on my cutting line, but only on the old mat. I tested several other fabrics and changed to new blades and had the same problem. I wiped off the mat with my hand and slightly deeper cut lines in the mat. It occurred to me that the blades were skipping as there was no flat smooth hard surface for the cutter to go against. I used a kitchen brush that has the green microfiber pad on it and gently went over it a couple times. That did the trick. Blades glided right over and cut perfectly. My blades were acting dull, but they were not the problem.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,096
    I sprayed basting spray on the back of my ruler, then rubbed most of it off. It now 'grips' the fabric, so the fabric doesn't slide. Because my hands don't like holding the ruler in place, I place my forearm (elbow to wrist) about 4 inches in on the ruler. It works for me, but is probably not a the safest way to cut, as the blade does slip on occasion. I started using this method, though, the second time the blade got away from me and nearly cut off the tip of my thumb.

    Again, my method of keeping the ruler in place is probably not the safest way to do it. I did try the little sticky dots, but the ruler slipped anyway. The clear double sticky tape does sound like it would work very nicely, though.

  18. #18
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Granite City, Scotland
    Posts
    1,626
    What position do you cut in? Are you comfortable? Do you stand or sit? What height is your table?

    My cutting definitely improved after I bought a small banquet table just for cutting and a set of height risers. It's light enough to set up by myself and put away after (I 'store' it in the bath, lol). No more worrying about slipping onto my good dining room table.
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    4,587
    I agree with the little rubber dots on the corners of your rulers. They help ALOT. Another thought, if you have difficulty 'walking' your hand up the ruler, get a couple of spring-type clamps at the home supply/hardware store. It does limit your cutting to the far edge of your cutting surface/table, but the ruler definitely won't slip.

  20. #20
    Junior Member GypsyRse1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Salem Oregon
    Posts
    163
    Blog Entries
    22
    I finally figured out that my problem is the mat....I had cut in the same spot so many times that the fabric was pushing down in there and the blade couldn't cut it. Try turning your mat around to an unused spot or maybe consider a new mat....I can cut anything now with no problem.

  21. #21
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,524
    TrueCut My Comfort 45mm Rotary Cutter

    Item #: 81993

    Ergonomic rotary cutter 45mm blade left or right handed


    The gal at one of our quilt stores uses a cutter similar to this. Same brand, different color. When she cuts, it seems to move easier ---------------or at least that is my observation from my side of the cutting table. I'm going to investigate.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  22. #22
    Senior Member Rose S.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    847
    The mat really makes a big difference...I have said it before somewhere on here. But here is my experience. I had the original white mat...or maybe I should say one of the first white mats. The ones from Joann's. Well, I was going through rotary blades. Too many for the amount of cutting I did. But I was working and didn't even consider the mat. Then was at a quilt show, and got a newer mat...another white one. I liked the lines on it better...just wanted something new.

    When I started with it, put a new blade in. I was not getting clean cuts. Somewhere along the way I had bought a medium sized green one...not sure of the brand. I had it by my sewing machine. I moved it over to my cutting table and was simply amazed at the difference. I don't sew every day...for sure don't do a lot of cutting most days. But my rotary blades last forever now. Keep in mind, when cutting strips, I use the 60 mm rotary cutter. They last longer than my 45 mm ones that I use near my machine for trimming crumb blocks, etc.

    The one thing for accuracy...I place my hand on one end and cut to about midway of the 24 inch ruler. I make sure I stop cutting and then lift my hand from the ruler and place it farther up the ruler. Sometimes I walk it up, but feel the thing that makes the difference is to really stop cutting before I move my hand. It is a thing of actually thinking 'stop' and then moving my hand. This might sound silly, but it really helped me.

  23. #23
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    A Hop from Heaven, a Skip from Sanity and a Jump from the Good Life....
    Posts
    7,119
    Blog Entries
    1
    Heres a link for rotary cutting basics- YouTube by pat sloan..


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjQNY9j_PIQ

  24. #24
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, Sweet Home Alabama
    Posts
    442
    If your hand is slipping when you cut, maybe your table is not the right height for you. If I work on a table that is too high (which is most of them because I'm short) I have less control, especially on a long cut. Maybe try working on a different surface. Not too low, though, or it's a backache waiting to happen. And I personally can't seem to cut while sitting at all.
    www.makeminepatchwork.etsy.com
    www.zibbet.com/makeminepatchwork
    "Piecin' a quilt's like livin' a life...The Lord sends us the pieces, but we can cut 'em out and put 'em together pretty much to suit ourselves, and there's a heap more in the cuttin' and the sewin' than there is in the caliker...I've had a heap of comfort all my life making quilts, and now in my old age I wouldn't take a fortune for them." (Eliza Calvert Hall, Aunt Jane of Kentucky)

  25. #25
    Junior Member sweetlummi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    silsbee TX
    Posts
    149
    I cut a lot it may be your cutting board, but any way I get my at walmark . As for the moving I know it happen to me when I do not move up with the cutter some time I cut at the table that when I mess up the most. I have a little place where I cut most my stuff there I can only go as far as my arm gos it works good. gl on finding your help

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.