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Thread: Sewing Question.

  1. #11
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    It seems to be the general concensus that perhaps I shouldn't do this. I don't tend to disagree. I do however have an extremely heavy, heavy duty metal machine that my hubby promised to dig out for me. I'll try it on there, one of the smaller patches so I don't cause a lot of damage. If I can't get it to work on that, then I'll give it back to him and explain that I jumped the gun.

    Thank you all so much, you definately saved me a big headache and perhaps a broken Janome, which would have made me sad!!

    M

  2. #12
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    Good Luck!

  3. #13
    bbwalkup's Avatar
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    I wouldn't try this either!! When I was in high school (long time ago) we had to sew the patches on our school jackets. One teacher recommended going to a shoe repair shop. Some kids took that route, it worked perfect for them. I had a Grandma that too could sew thru anything, but she did it by hand. I've never tried sewing leather on a machine. I'd vote for hiring someone to do it for ya!! Good Luck

  4. #14
    Catherine's Avatar
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    In my past business I sewed patches on lots of leather jackets.
    It's best just to use a standard machine, the ones with bells and whistles have no guts to handle leather. It isn't a hard job. I used a medium weight needle the larger ones will make bigger holes, not good, and tend to break. i know that sounds strange but it is true. I did use a little heavier weight thread, or the nylon is fine, just stitch along the inside
    statin stitch of patch. Be careful of any lining, make sure it isn't twisted. Once you sew on leather thats it...so don't make any mistakes, like accidently sewing it on upside down or crooked, taking it off you'll have to match it back up so holes don't show. Believe me, customers and friends will frown on that..holes don't come out of leather. PLEASE DO NOT IRON PATCH ON....that's just digging your own grave!!! Hope this helped.
    Good Luck!!

  5. #15
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Thanks Catherine..I appreciate it!! Will be able to get larger machine out on Friday. Hubby can haul it out for me as it is kinda heavy. But it has no bells and whistles like my normal one does.

    Thanks again!

    Melissa

  6. #16
    Norah's Avatar
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    I have sewn a lot of leather by hand and by machine, so let me help you. First of all, you have to have a walking foot industrial or heavy duty machine to machine sew nand really heavy needles, size 16 or 18, and I used nylon thread called nymo.
    By hand you need leather or glover's needles, they are three sided on the tip and very sharp, available at someplace like Tandy Leather or in some craft needle selections. You can use nymo thread which has a twisted ply or heavy cotton or polyester. If the leather is cowhide, you may need a sewing awl, which may have that type of needle already. Without the awl or the right needle, it is next to impossible to get a needle through the leather. If it is elk, or something softer like that, it is easier to sew. If you make a mistake, the hole will be there forever. I would not try it if the person is picky. Leather is fun, but a whole new game in sewing. Hope this helps.

  7. #17
    Member imak's Avatar
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    mpeters All very good advice PLUS---Please make sure you don't make the stitches too close together! If you do it will make a complete hole in the jacket!

    Been there!! Have real good luck if you decide to try it!!

    imak

  8. #18

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    Nylon thread would probably do ok. Use a thimble because it will probably be hard to push the need through the leather and patch. Stick the needle from behind and through the patch and it should hide the knot. You could spray the back of the patch with 505 adhesive spray and temporarily adhere the patch to the leather so it won't move around while you sew it on, but 505 if kind of expensive. It won't be fast to hand sew them on just so you know.

  9. #19
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Well, I finally got it done. You don't even want to know!!! I won't do anything like this again for anyone! I couldn't get my good heavy machine out of my storage unit as hubby as blocked it all off with heavy stuff I couldn't move. Had to use my newer machine. It's not happy. I'm glad it needed maintenanced anyway. It didn't break anything, but I'm sure the machine needs therapy. I spaced the stitching pretty even and even though I used a walking foot it was still #@&% to do. I'm just glad I got it done. I can't get over how nice it looks though..

    Thank you everyone for your advice. For all the girls that said they wouldn't do it...you were right..won't do it again!

  10. #20
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    Good for you! I know that it can be so frustrating to work so hard on something! Especially when every stitch is a challenge. Glad you were able to get it done.

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