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Thread: So how do I use an applique pressing sheet?

  1. #1
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    I've got a wall hanging pattern that I'm trying to decide how I'm going to put together. It recommends fusible web applique and this will be the first time I've worked with fusible web. At first I thought I would trace the pattern onto some sheets of overhead projector type material and use that over the top of my applique to line up the pieces. But then I started reading about applique pressing sheets. It seems you put the pattern under those (which are see through I assume?) and build your applique on top of the pressing sheet, and the fusible doesn't stick. Is this correct?

    Those of you who have done this kind of applique before, which method do you find the easiest?

  2. #2
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I am just learning applique so I will watch and see what the experts say :wink:

  3. #3
    Pam
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    I use mine like a press cloth between the sticky stuff and the iron. If you are doing a complex design where you are fusing several layers together, you can place your pattern underneath and "build" your applique from the farthest object, to the closest.

  4. #4
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use mine like a press cloth between the sticky stuff and the iron. If you are doing a complex design where you are fusing several layers together, you can place your pattern underneath and "build" your applique from the farthest object, to the closest.
    So you take the paper side off the fusible, and press it right on to the sheet, but it doesn't stick to the sheet, right? It peels off and then you can press the finished piece to your background fabric?

  5. #5
    Pam
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    In theory you can use the backing, but in real life there is still al little of the sticky that gets on your iron. I have a big fiberglass sheet, and can usually fold it over, so BOTH sides are protected. If that does not work, sheet to small, ect, you can use parchment paper as a pressing sheet. It will not stick to that.

    When you are stitching it down, remember, go with the pieces that are farthest from you, then the middle area and so on. That way it will not look like it was stitched "by accident".

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    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I build my appliques by ironing them right on the pressing sheet. I do put my design underneath it to use as a guide. Then I peel the whole thing off and iron it on the fabric. I have two sheets, so I could place one on the top and press, but I have never had an issue with the little bit of fusible on the edges of the applique pieces getting on my iron.

  7. #7
    Super Member canmitch1971's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    I build my appliques by ironing them right on the pressing sheet. I do put my design underneath it to use as a guide. Then I peel the whole thing off and iron it on the fabric. I have two sheets, so I could place one on the top and press, but I have never had an issue with the little bit of fusible on the edges of the applique pieces getting on my iron.

    That is what I do too. I lay down the picture, then put the sheet on top and then I start laying down all the pieces in order. Does that make sense?

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    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:
    It's not a stupid question...and the answer is that you can;t see the drawing, which is why I just have the picture/pattern to the side and eyeball the layout. As the previous poster said, always work from the bottom/back to the front/top.

    Let the applique cool before peeling it up and you'll leave less glue on the sheet. Also, when the pressing sheet is cool, check with your hand for any left over glue and wipe it off with a paper towel or fabric scrap before using it again.

  10. #10
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktbb
    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:
    It's not a stupid question...and the answer is that you can;t see the drawing, which is why I just have the picture/pattern to the side and eyeball the layout. As the previous poster said, always work from the bottom/back to the front/top.

    Let the applique cool before peeling it up and you'll leave less glue on the sheet. Also, when the pressing sheet is cool, check with your hand for any left over glue and wipe it off with a paper towel or fabric scrap before using it again.
    You can also scrap off the excess glue with an old credit card. Just hold it at an angle and scrap across the surface and that old glue peels right off.

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