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Thread: So how do I use an applique pressing sheet?

  1. #1
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    I've got a wall hanging pattern that I'm trying to decide how I'm going to put together. It recommends fusible web applique and this will be the first time I've worked with fusible web. At first I thought I would trace the pattern onto some sheets of overhead projector type material and use that over the top of my applique to line up the pieces. But then I started reading about applique pressing sheets. It seems you put the pattern under those (which are see through I assume?) and build your applique on top of the pressing sheet, and the fusible doesn't stick. Is this correct?

    Those of you who have done this kind of applique before, which method do you find the easiest?

  2. #2
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I am just learning applique so I will watch and see what the experts say :wink:

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    Pam
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    I use mine like a press cloth between the sticky stuff and the iron. If you are doing a complex design where you are fusing several layers together, you can place your pattern underneath and "build" your applique from the farthest object, to the closest.

  4. #4
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use mine like a press cloth between the sticky stuff and the iron. If you are doing a complex design where you are fusing several layers together, you can place your pattern underneath and "build" your applique from the farthest object, to the closest.
    So you take the paper side off the fusible, and press it right on to the sheet, but it doesn't stick to the sheet, right? It peels off and then you can press the finished piece to your background fabric?

  5. #5
    Pam
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    In theory you can use the backing, but in real life there is still al little of the sticky that gets on your iron. I have a big fiberglass sheet, and can usually fold it over, so BOTH sides are protected. If that does not work, sheet to small, ect, you can use parchment paper as a pressing sheet. It will not stick to that.

    When you are stitching it down, remember, go with the pieces that are farthest from you, then the middle area and so on. That way it will not look like it was stitched "by accident".

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    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I build my appliques by ironing them right on the pressing sheet. I do put my design underneath it to use as a guide. Then I peel the whole thing off and iron it on the fabric. I have two sheets, so I could place one on the top and press, but I have never had an issue with the little bit of fusible on the edges of the applique pieces getting on my iron.

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    Super Member canmitch1971's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    I build my appliques by ironing them right on the pressing sheet. I do put my design underneath it to use as a guide. Then I peel the whole thing off and iron it on the fabric. I have two sheets, so I could place one on the top and press, but I have never had an issue with the little bit of fusible on the edges of the applique pieces getting on my iron.

    That is what I do too. I lay down the picture, then put the sheet on top and then I start laying down all the pieces in order. Does that make sense?

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    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:
    It's not a stupid question...and the answer is that you can;t see the drawing, which is why I just have the picture/pattern to the side and eyeball the layout. As the previous poster said, always work from the bottom/back to the front/top.

    Let the applique cool before peeling it up and you'll leave less glue on the sheet. Also, when the pressing sheet is cool, check with your hand for any left over glue and wipe it off with a paper towel or fabric scrap before using it again.

  10. #10
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktbb
    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:
    It's not a stupid question...and the answer is that you can;t see the drawing, which is why I just have the picture/pattern to the side and eyeball the layout. As the previous poster said, always work from the bottom/back to the front/top.

    Let the applique cool before peeling it up and you'll leave less glue on the sheet. Also, when the pressing sheet is cool, check with your hand for any left over glue and wipe it off with a paper towel or fabric scrap before using it again.
    You can also scrap off the excess glue with an old credit card. Just hold it at an angle and scrap across the surface and that old glue peels right off.

  11. #11
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelcb80
    I've got a wall hanging pattern that I'm trying to decide how I'm going to put together. It recommends fusible web applique and this will be the first time I've worked with fusible web. At first I thought I would trace the pattern onto some sheets of overhead projector type material and use that over the top of my applique to line up the pieces. But then I started reading about applique pressing sheets. It seems you put the pattern under those (which are see through I assume?) and build your applique on top of the pressing sheet, and the fusible doesn't stick. Is this correct?

    Those of you who have done this kind of applique before, which method do you find the easiest?
    Yes, you are correct. You can see the pattern through the applique sheet. You place your appliques on top of the sheet (fabric side up), and arrange them according to your pattern. If the whole applique piece isn't too large, try to place it on one half of the applique sheet. Then fold the other half over it and press. Just in case your fusible is a tiny bit larger than your fabric piece, or if it has shifted, you won't get any fusible on your iron.
    I hope this is clearer than mud. :lol:

  12. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Why is a pressing sheet better than parchment paper? With parchment paper you can draw your pattern on one side, turn it over and build your applique on the other, cover it with another piece of parchment paper, press, cool, remove and you're all set. The sheets can be used over and over again and tossed out with no guilt when messed up. A roll lasts a long time, is less expensive to buy, is sold at any grocery store, has many different uses, is easy to store, and you can bake cookies on it to boot! So why is a pressing sheet better?

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    This is very very interesting to me because I admire the wall hangings but have never considered learning how. :lol: I am not considering learning how now either. :lol:
    I am just sitting here on my couch with my mouth hanging open in awe. This sounds very complicated to me and I admire each of you who know how and each of you who are learning. I like the way this post is going. It is like a lot of mama hens getting all the litte chicks back under the wing so they are coddled and protected. I love that about the quiltingboard! :thumbup:

  14. #14
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktbb
    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    Ok I have a stupid question... but after you start putting pieces on the sheet how do you see to know where to place the fabrics on top of what is already there? Does that make sense :roll:
    It's not a stupid question...and the answer is that you can;t see the drawing, which is why I just have the picture/pattern to the side and eyeball the layout. As the previous poster said, always work from the bottom/back to the front/top.

    Let the applique cool before peeling it up and you'll leave less glue on the sheet. Also, when the pressing sheet is cool, check with your hand for any left over glue and wipe it off with a paper towel or fabric scrap before using it again.
    I think this is where using both methods I mentioned above might be handy. Use the pattern under a pressing sheet but also have your pattern traced on to some overhead projector sheets. Then you can lay that on top of your applique and see that you are indeed lining up pieces correctly. I think I will employ both methods this time and see what works, and what seems like overkill. :)

    But here's my other question; What do you do if your pattern is much larger than your ironing board? I know I've seen mention of pressing boards, but I only have an ironing board. Am I gonna need to make up some type of wider pressing surface?

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    "But here's my other question; What do you do if your pattern is much larger than your ironing board? I know I've seen mention of pressing boards, but I only have an ironing board. Am I gonna need to make up some type of wider pressing surface?"

    I build mine in sections then move each section to the background fabric, ironing each in place as I go. I also have made temporary ironing surfaces on my kitchen counters by laying down batting and extra fabric (insulbrite does a great job here since it helps protect the counter).

    In response to the question about parchment paper - parchment is not better or worse than pressing/applique sheets, it's just a little different. I use parchment at home a lot, but also travel, and the pressing sheet travels better than a roll of parchment....and you can cook on the pressing sheet as well (I just wouldn't want to use it for cooking after using it for glueing!!!

    Lots of techniques, each has its own benefits depending on sewing style, situation and need.

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    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    wonder if we should find some links about applique

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