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Thread: Starching little pieces; slick trick

  1. #1
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Starching little pieces; slick trick

    Am fairly new to quilting; making 1/2" log cabins sashing; had awful time making them come out even and keeping fairly straight stitch. I use wax paper occasionally to clean iron, well I had a couple well used pieces laying by the ironing board and the lightbulb went off..........you know how if you try to starch a tiny piece sometimes it will stick to the iron and you have to wait for starch to soak in...........I put my little pieces on top of one used piece wax paper; spray starched them; covered with other used piece of wax paper and pressed; worked so slick; you can even flip the whole thing over and press other side insuring that it is completely dry; then just peel the two pieces apart and you have crisp little pieces, no mess all over the iron board cover etc. This worked great for me being I failed to starch heavily after pre-wash, I had just used sizing and it didn't stiffen those stubborn little guys enough. Just thought I would share.

    Have a peaceful Sunday. Antylu

  2. #2
    Super Member Quiltaddict's Avatar
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    Great hint, thanks.

  3. #3
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
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    I agree, now if only I can remember it~
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

  4. #4
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    Adds new meaning to the phrase "Necessity is the mother of invention"!!! Good for you - I'm going to have to remember that, too!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks for the great tip!
    Nancy in western NY

  6. #6
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    Great tip! Thanks! I'll be using this.

  7. #7
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
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    Thanks, what a neat idea!

  8. #8
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Cool ...

    Two questions.

    1) in essence you are "wax coating" the fabric as opposed to "starching" the fabric. correct?

    2) you use wax paper to clean your iron? I've not heard of this before. how does it work?
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  9. #9
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    This is a great idea! I prefer working with stiffer fabric and will use this idea. Thanks so much.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  10. #10
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    Cool ...

    Two questions.

    1) in essence you are "wax coating" the fabric as opposed to "starching" the fabric. correct?

    2) you use wax paper to clean your iron? I've not heard of this before. how does it work?

    I'm puzzled too ... as I am thinking a wax residue is building up on your iron ... and fabric.
    And I'm wondering what potential problems that may create in the long run.



    I have been using parchment as a pressing cloth at times.
    No residue ... just acts as a shield between the iron and fabric.

    For starch ... I've switched to Best Press ... you can get it nice and stiff, and I am finding it is not causing the scorching and residue I was getting from spray starch.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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