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Thread: Starching little pieces; slick trick

  1. #1
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Starching little pieces; slick trick

    Am fairly new to quilting; making 1/2" log cabins sashing; had awful time making them come out even and keeping fairly straight stitch. I use wax paper occasionally to clean iron, well I had a couple well used pieces laying by the ironing board and the lightbulb went off..........you know how if you try to starch a tiny piece sometimes it will stick to the iron and you have to wait for starch to soak in...........I put my little pieces on top of one used piece wax paper; spray starched them; covered with other used piece of wax paper and pressed; worked so slick; you can even flip the whole thing over and press other side insuring that it is completely dry; then just peel the two pieces apart and you have crisp little pieces, no mess all over the iron board cover etc. This worked great for me being I failed to starch heavily after pre-wash, I had just used sizing and it didn't stiffen those stubborn little guys enough. Just thought I would share.

    Have a peaceful Sunday. Antylu

  2. #2
    Super Member Quiltaddict's Avatar
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    Great hint, thanks.

  3. #3
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
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    I agree, now if only I can remember it~
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

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    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    Adds new meaning to the phrase "Necessity is the mother of invention"!!! Good for you - I'm going to have to remember that, too!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks for the great tip!
    Nancy in western NY
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  6. #6
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    Great tip! Thanks! I'll be using this.

  7. #7
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
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    Thanks, what a neat idea!

  8. #8
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Cool ...

    Two questions.

    1) in essence you are "wax coating" the fabric as opposed to "starching" the fabric. correct?

    2) you use wax paper to clean your iron? I've not heard of this before. how does it work?
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  9. #9
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    This is a great idea! I prefer working with stiffer fabric and will use this idea. Thanks so much.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  10. #10
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    Cool ...

    Two questions.

    1) in essence you are "wax coating" the fabric as opposed to "starching" the fabric. correct?

    2) you use wax paper to clean your iron? I've not heard of this before. how does it work?

    I'm puzzled too ... as I am thinking a wax residue is building up on your iron ... and fabric.
    And I'm wondering what potential problems that may create in the long run.



    I have been using parchment as a pressing cloth at times.
    No residue ... just acts as a shield between the iron and fabric.

    For starch ... I've switched to Best Press ... you can get it nice and stiff, and I am finding it is not causing the scorching and residue I was getting from spray starch.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
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  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    It is annoying to keep the pieces from sticking to the iron. I'll use this tip a lot. My mother used old bread wrappers to have her iron glide over clothes. They use to be coated in wax. Just iron the wax paper. The wax isn't a problem on the iron or fabric. And the cereal box bags were very thick wax paper. We saved the cereal bags to make the playground slide slick and we would zip down it fast as lightening! My kids thought wax paper was for slides. LOL. I need to slide again for fun, if there is big slide left in the playgrounds today.
    Last edited by BellaBoo; 10-28-2012 at 07:31 AM.
    Got fabric?

  12. #12
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    As I understand it-when the wax is heated it evaporates into water vapor, CO2 and CO, much like when a candle burns. PS--I did a google search.
    Like the parchment idea though, QE

    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    I'm puzzled too ... as I am thinking a wax residue is building up on your iron ... and fabric.
    And I'm wondering what potential problems that may create in the long run.



    I have been using parchment as a pressing cloth at times.
    No residue ... just acts as a shield between the iron and fabric.

    For starch ... I've switched to Best Press ... you can get it nice and stiff, and I am finding it is not causing the scorching and residue I was getting from spray starch.
    Don't worry spider.
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    I donate quilts to the AAQI.

  13. #13
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oksewglad View Post
    As I understand it-when the wax is heated it evaporates into water vapor, CO2 and CO, much like when a candle burns. PS--I did a google search.
    Like the parchment idea though, QE

    And here I thought you were a science major!!!
    Thanks! ....... though now you'll have some fearing CO poisoning!

    One thing I like about the parchment ... it stays solid and doesn't disintegrate as I work with it.
    And if you fear your iron is a little dirty ... it keeps the fabric clean
    (lessons learned with that signature yellow PC backgrounder! )
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  14. #14
    Super Member Helen S's Avatar
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    I used to watch my mother and grandmother run their irons over waxed paper every time they began a project, or just to do normal ironing. It works well, cleans the stainless steel iron surface easily and effectively! I have never had any issues with using waxed paper on my own iron, and in fact, run for it every time I have a sticky iron. If you put it down first, then put your fabric on top of it, the starch won't build up on your ironing board cover either.
    Being skinny isn't easy, so I gave up and opted for being sexy instead. (aunty acid)

  15. #15
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I got a great tip from a poster here, iron two pieces of parchment paper together and you have a great pressing sheet. I liked it so much I made one for each quilt goody bag my guild gives to new members.
    Got fabric?

  16. #16
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    Cool ...

    Two questions.

    1) in essence you are "wax coating" the fabric as opposed to "starching" the fabric. correct?

    2) you use wax paper to clean your iron? I've not heard of this before. how does it work?
    No, this wax paper has been used to run my iron over so there is very little wax left on (after using a few times it is almost like translucent parchment paper. I am using it underneath my pieces to spray on and then use the other used piece on top which sandwiches the little devils in between thus preventing them from sticking to the iron or moving all over the place.

    I guess "cleaning" the iron was not the right description, I have found running the iron (clean) over wax paper occasionally will make it glide over the fabric nicely. I think I was taught this in 4-H many many years ago.

  17. #17
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    NOW you tell us! Really, thanks for sharing. I wonder if freezer paper would work as well? I'll try it and see!
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
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  18. #18
    Senior Member purplecat's Avatar
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    Thanks for the good tips! I'm going to try them out.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    It is annoying to keep the pieces from sticking to the iron. I'll use this tip a lot. My mother used old bread wrappers to have her iron glide over clothes. They use to be coated in wax. Just iron the wax paper. The wax isn't a problem on the iron or fabric. And the cereal box bags were very thick wax paper. We saved the cereal bags to make the playground slide slick and we would zip down it fast as lightening! My kids thought wax paper was for slides. LOL. I need to slide again for fun, if there is big slide left in the playgrounds today.
    i remember my mom saving bread wrappers,too! If you needed to grease a pan you grabbed a bread wrapper.
    also remember getting in trouble at school for going down the slide with a bread wrapper underneath me! "it makes the slide too fast" Solved that problem by walking to the schoolyard on the weekend and slicking up the slide for the week!

  20. #20
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antylu View Post
    No, this wax paper has been used to run my iron over so there is very little wax left on (after using a few times it is almost like translucent parchment paper. I am using it underneath my pieces to spray on and then use the other used piece on top which sandwiches the little devils in between thus preventing them from sticking to the iron or moving all over the place.

    I guess "cleaning" the iron was not the right description, I have found running the iron (clean) over wax paper occasionally will make it glide over the fabric nicely. I think I was taught this in 4-H many many years ago.
    A ha! another 4-H er in the midst. Maybe where I first heard it, too. I just didn't keep doing it!
    Don't worry spider.
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    I donate quilts to the AAQI.

  21. #21
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oksewglad View Post
    A ha! another 4-H er in the midst. Maybe where I first heard it, too. I just didn't keep doing it!
    Did you sew the tea towel and apron? Those were the days. I have a niece in Upper Michigan who works for extension there and they still have very active 4-H! Wish more young people today would embrace those great programs.

  22. #22
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    I sewed the apron with a flexible plastic semicircle that was threaded through a casing. My GC are beginning 4-H right now. 9 yo GD was here this morning and we worked on her horse wall hanging; all cut out and ready to sew. Then she had to go home. 8 yo GD made a music bag for her piano books under her mother's guidance.

    Here's what 9 yo and I did this summer--

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...w-t195329.html
    Last edited by oksewglad; 10-28-2012 at 11:38 AM.
    Don't worry spider.
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    I donate quilts to the AAQI.

  23. #23
    Senior Member batikmystique's Avatar
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    Always looking for ways to make things easier, neater and faster...I will remember this one...thanks!
    Creative clutter is better than idle neatness.

  24. #24
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    So many of us have green blood flowing thru our veins!!
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  25. #25
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip. Sounds like a good thing.
    Suzanne
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