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Thread: Stitch in the ditch

  1. #11
    Roben's Avatar
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    I use SID to anchor the blocks of my quilt - for me, it defines separate spaces and I don't have to worry about the fabrics shifting as I free motion within those defined spaces. It may not show very well on the front (which is okay, I really don't want it to be the focus on the front) but it helps define the quilting on the back, and I really like the look of that. It's also nice to be able to put on the walking foot for some easier quilting :lol: :lol:

  2. #12
    Junior Member Arizona Sunrises's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpspeedy
    I know this sounds stupid but why is stitch in the ditch so popular? I guess as a predominately handquilter I just don't understand. I only do that when I machine quilt and then I use a decorative stitch that straddles the seam line. The only time I stitch in the ditch by hand is if I am using a cheater's panel that looks like piecing or applique but is just printed on the fabric. I have done some of those that are fake Baltimore Alblum prints. Even other quilters don't realize they are fakes until they get real up close and personal with my work.

    When handquilting an item that has been hand pieced I make sure I quilt at least an 1/8 or 1/4 inch inside the piece to renforce the stitching of the pieceing.

    My thinking is that the quilting stitch be it hand or machine is what makes it a "quilt". Even if mine is not perfect I want others to know that at least I tried.
    I work 50-60 hours per week, don't have time to learn to do FMQ at this point in time, and refuse to send my work to a long-armer...and just simply don't have the cash to buy a long-arm for myself. SID is quick, simple, to the point, and gets the job done. FMQ is something I'll eventually learn to do, but it probably won't be until I'm considerably older and retired. :)

  3. #13
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    Stitching in the ditch drives me batty. I hate not getting it exactly right so I prefer to stipple just so I'm not constantly looking at that one spot that I missed it just by a hair :lol:

    So you could say that I'm not a fan of it. I have a friend that does it. It is the only way she quilts...

  4. #14
    Super Member Joan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ducky
    I stitch in the ditch and really don't mind doing it. I can't afford to take all my quilts to a long-armer, I don't hand quilt (If I did, it would take forever to get anything done between work, family, etc.), and I haven't learned to do FM....yet. I feel lucky to get quilting and counted cross stitch done.
    Ducky says it all. I took a FM class and realized that I would have to practice A LOT before I would be skilled enough to tackle a "real" quilt. Stitching in the ditch is much easier, the "road is there"---just follow it. I hope to be able to FM some day and would like to try my hand at hand quilting, too. It is (in my mind anyway) the most beautiful quilting. My great grandmother made quilts that are all hand pieced and hand quilted. There is nothing that compares!

  5. #15
    Power Poster
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    I'm going to repeat what Joan said:

    "Stitching in the ditch is much easier, the "road is there"--just follow it"

    I will usually add a little more quilting after the SID is done - don't have to mark a lot of lines -

    I think it looks nice on the back of the quilt




  6. #16
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I only hand quilt , so never use it

  7. #17
    Super Member Iluv2quilt's Avatar
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    I stitch in the ditch for all of my wall hangings and table runners. I would love to learn how to free motion quilt. I have used the long arm for larger quilts but am just learning how using a pantograph. I'm not good at freehand on the long arm yet.

  8. #18
    Super Member mamaw's Avatar
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    Stitching in the ditch is great for someone who cannot afford to hire a long-arm quilter (like myself), and wants to quilt their own projects. I also like echo quilting a 1/4'' from the seams.
    I agree with the others.....free motion takes lots and lots of practice.
    The Maine Quilt Show is next weekend, and quilting stencils is on my list of things to check out. Maybe then, I can spread my wings and delve into something a little fancier than the ditch.

  9. #19
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    I don't stitch in the ditch very often. One quilt I'm working on now has "melons". Since the melons are comprised of 6 different fabrics sewn together and the melon edges are curved, the seam allowances want to misbehave, so I basted them down (by hand) and then I stitched in the ditch around each melon, so the seam allowances are now unable to flop around. I don't need stitching in the ditch is something that is required or preferable very often, but sometimes it is the perfect solution.

  10. #20
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    Correction: Replace "need" in my last sentence with "think".

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