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Thread: Stitch in the ditch

  1. #26
    Super Member Ducky's Avatar
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    Jenell, my SID foot allows me to stay right in the ditch. I would like to try that method (can't think of what it's called for the life of me!) where you stitch 1/4 away from ditch. It looks pretty.

  2. #27
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    My SID foot stitches just a stitch width to the right of the ditch, so I use a matching or invisible thread. However, in doing my last SID project (king sized quilt), I had some issues with the metal bar getting hung up where points met. Also, since it only allowed me to sew to the right of the ditch, I had problems with quilt bulk; I changed to a regular foot which allowed me to sew either right or left side of the "melons" that I was sewing around. My accuracy was as good as, if not better than when I used the SID foot.

  3. #28

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    I am so glad to hear from others that are struggling with fmq. I have been sewing/quilting for years and I fmq but am never really satisfied with the results. I'm better than I used to be so I guess it just takes a lot of practice. I almost always sid with monofilament on top and cotton in bobbin, and then fill in with fmq. I want to branch out to all over designs with decorative threads but don't ever want to sacrifice a quilt top to experiment.
    Molly O

  4. #29
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I like 'anchoring' with SID - especially in a quilt with sashing. Then I don't have to worry about layers shifting in either the blocks or the sashing when I do the 'fancy' stitching. John Flynn suggests 'anchoring' with water-soluble thread in EITHER bobbin or on top. That makes it easy to remove when the quilt is finished if you don't want it to be permanent. Yes, water-soluble thread IS expensive, but it's worth it if that's what you want to do. Klue's idea of SID basting is similar - AND less expensive!!

  5. #30
    Senior Member quiltswithdogs's Avatar
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    I started with SID but had a hard time with it. Then I moved my stitch line over a tiny fraction ~1/8th and discovered I prefer to have the stitches visible for a more quilty look. I guess you can call that "SID-Off the Mark". Then I tried just quilting down the quilt in a wave and people liked that. In general, quilting is hard for me with my hands, but on smaller projects like pillows, I do free motion, although I'm afraid I'm not really that good at it. It's a process.

  6. #31

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    Hello all,

    I have a question. When stitching in the ditch do you use a walking foot and do you drop the feed dogs. I am sitting reading all about this. I have been doing everything by hand.

    Thanks Ann

  7. #32
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Pfaffs have a built-in walking foot, which is the main reason I bought it. I use the SID foot which has a guide BELOW the foot to keep me right in the ditch.

  8. #33
    Senior Member billswife99's Avatar
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    AnnM, I think you need to use the walking foot and the feed dogs. I am going to be trying this very soon and if I'm wrong I hope somebody stops me!!! I am planning on SID on a zig zag quilt and then going to try fmq between the zig zags to give it a more curvy look. Make sense?

  9. #34

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    I have an edging foot(I think that's what it's called) that has a "blade thingy" in the middle. Is that a SID foot? I have a Pfaff 7570.
    Molly O

  10. #35
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    yes thats it

  11. #36
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    Roben, that's why I do SID...It does a nice job of securing all the layers, and I like the way it shows up on the back. I'm in the process of learning (on my own) the art of FM, but it will take me awhile, and like many others, I can't afford to have someone else quilt a piece for me. And the IDT foot on my Pfaff makes it easy to feed the layer through without a walking foot.

  12. #37
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    Joanne, that's what I love about my Pfaff, but I need to get the foot for SID. I keep forgetting when I'm in town...and I go almost every day to my workplace!

  13. #38
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    JoJo - you'll love it when you finally get it. It's really versatile. Ask the dealer to show you ALL the other things you can do with it. Someone in the store is bound to know - otherwise ask about it here, and we'll start describing! I'm half asleep right now, or I'd do it.

    My favorite, besides SID, is to join leftover pieces of batting. Use the faggoting stitch - I think that's actually what the foot was designed to do - it's called an 'edge-joining foot.' When you join batting pieces with this stitch, it really doesn't show when the quilt is quilted. Much faster than whipping them together by hand.

  14. #39
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    I had to chuckle, Joanne, because a couple of years ago, a friend of mine gave me a black trash bag FULL of scraps of batting big enough to piece together...which I did by butting the straight edges together and zigzagging them. I ended up with a piece large enough for the quilt I needed batting for! Now I just have to sandwich everything and get it quilted...which probably won't happen until after my daughter's wedding in September!

  15. #40
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    I SID a few threads beside the ditch, guess that could be echo quilting if I did more than the one line of quilting. The reason I don't SID directly on top of my piecing stitch is - I was taught that the needle could pierce and break the piecing stitch while SID, so I just never have. Has that ever happened to anyone here?

    I am still a newbie and only quilted a few small wallhangings. Have five tops done now and trying to get up the nerve to start the quilting process, my Bailey 15" arrived last week, finally.

    I don't use a professional long arm quilter because, and this is just my humble opinion, this is my hobby and I want these to be mine and if someone else quilts them, they will probably be much much prettier, but they won't be mine anymore, again jmho.

  16. #41
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    i'm like you maribeth, i'd much rather do everything myself even if that means its less than perfect.

    congrats on the bailey, did you buy a frame with it or did you already have a frame?

    i look forward to seeing pics of your progress.

  17. #42
    Super Member May in Jersey's Avatar
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    Another Pfaff owner who has the SID foot. Love it as my free motion skills are pretty bad. May in Jersey

  18. #43
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    Klue,

    When I started this whole quilting for therapy thing after my mom died last year I let myself be talked into purchasing a Grace Pinnacle frame w/the 9" Babylock Professional Quilter. Which, btw, is a fabulous straight stitch machine for piecing, but I am just not coordinated enough to be able to get a quilt rolled up in that 9" space for quilting. :oops: I know it's me and you and many others can do it with little problem. So, I decided if I am really going to do this myself I have to accomodate my uncoordinated self and use the Bailey.

    I have to figure out the photo posting, I am just so not computer-able, maybe that skill is connected to the quilting uncoordination. (Did I just make up a word?)

  19. #44
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    maribeth

    its not you, very large quilts have a hard time on a 9 inch machine. it would work for me only because i make wall hangings 90% of the time.

    the utility quilts that i make from time to time our either for children (twin size) or a throw size.

    i like the idea that the frames can take on even the largest bailey because you can at least keep your frame setup and just upgrade down the line like you did.

    congrats it a beautiful toy to have.

  20. #45
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I've managed to machine quilt a Queen size and a King size - BUT I did wavy lines, NOT FM, on the Q, and I used John Flynn's frame for the K. It WAS on my regular Pfaff, though with the standard throat. JF's frame just made it easier to guide the quilt. I did straight lines on the King. I'm gonna get out my Quilt scrapbook & find the pictures to post further down in this thread, so you'll see that it CAN be done LOL - but you add a few words to your vocabulary along the way :evil: :evil: :evil:

  21. #46
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    More -
    These 2 are wedding quilts made for college classmates of my daughter.

    The Red and Blue, a Margaret Miller inspired design, is called 'Big Game' because the bride and groom are from rival colleges, and 'Beat Cal' is hand quilted in the border. Made in 1993 when I was still hand quilting.

    The other looks like a Parcheesi board to me, but it's Georgia Bonesteel's 'Mother's Amish Dream' - another fom '93 when I was still handquilting

    Watermelons from one of GD's dresses.
    Attached Images Attached Images



  22. #47
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Here's the back of the 2003 wedding quilt.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  23. #48
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacelady
    I'm not at all sure why it's popular. I am not all that keen on doing it, because it has the effect of not showing. Plus, if the seam allowances are both ironed in the same direction (i.e. towards the darker of the patches), then I find it quite hard to sew on the seam line anyway. If I do intend to SID, I often iron my seams open. Shock, horror. I reason that when quilters were advised to iron both to one side, it was probably in the times when patches were hand stitched, and at that point, were relatively weak. Now we mostly machine patches together, and in my case, I use quite a short stitch. Ironing them open is a little harder, but it is much easier to quilt over - you don't 'fall off' the higher side. If ironed open, it is also easier to hand quilt over the seams too. I don't seem to have any problem lining up patches either, though nestling in seams together when they are ironed both to one side is also good, except I often found that I had them ironed the wrong way to do that. Hey ho, life is ever thus.
    I'm a "ditcher" and I learned a neat trick on Simply Quilts. They talked about the "wobbly stitch" for stitching in the ditch. It's the lowest setting on your zig zag width. It's just a slight zigzag. Try your best stitching over the seam, but with the zig and the zag being very slight, it's not as notiaceable when you do miss the mark. I did it on a couple of quilts (one with a thicker batting) and it really looked nice. Well, I thought so. :roll: Try it.

  24. #49
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    joanne

    what an outstanding job!! i'm amazed by what can be done on the flynn frame. i'm so happy with mine and it costs under $100 - you just can't go wrong.

  25. #50

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    I have done some large quilts on my Pfaff as well by rolling them. They are very difficult to handle. and of course there is much room for improvement with the quilting I have poured over the Harriet Hargrave books and just marvel at how she and Diane Gaudynski do such beautiful fm with a domestic machine. I recently purchased Ricky Tims dvd, Grande Finale & he quilts huge quilts without rolling them. The greatest thing I've got to overcome is uneven stitches. I would have loved to have been able to purchase a longarm a few years ago but now my hearts desire is a Bernina with stitch regulator. I bought a fabric mover but wasn't pleased with that so I returned it. I'm definitly looking for the easy button! I tried the John Flynn a few years ago but wanted to sid & the fm patterns wouldn't work with the horizontal look of the quilting I've also tried the EZ 1&2 but not pleased with that either. Anybody else out there that has tried all the gadgets??sorry to be so wordy but you all are the only ones that can really feel my pain :D
    mollyo

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