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Thread: Synthetic Fibers?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Hi all,

    I am so disappointed. I went to the Dr.'s for allergy testing today. I found out I am allergic to practically everything. One of the things I am allergic to is dust. On a sheet the nurse gave me it states that I should probably use synthetic fiber coverlets. It states anythin which produces a fuzz will always increase your problems with dust. I am wondering what to use for quilts. I assume poly/cotton blends would work, and I looked on my 80/20 batting and it states it is non-allergenic. Are regular cotton batts non-allergenic, or would I be better off using the 80/20 and or poly batts, and poly/cotton blends for my quilts.

    I will probably be going in for regular allergy shots to help control this.

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    These are probably questions for your allergist. :wink:
    I am allergic to dust, so I have to wash all of my bedding frequently, no matter what it is made with. :D:D:D

  3. #3
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    The dust most people are allergic to is caused by dust mites. They live on dead skin cells (these come off of us no matter how many times we bathe) and animal danders. I am highly allergic to "house dust" and my doctor tells me to wear a mask if I have to do the dusting. Using a vacuum with a HEPA filter helps. My vacuum is designed for people like me (Dyson is not the maker by the way). Any bagless vacuum causes me problems because you have to empty the dust somehow. :roll:

  4. #4
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    Amma,

    Thank you for letting me know. I don't want to give up my quilting, so I guess the best thing is to keep the house as dust free as possible.

  5. #5
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    When my two daughters with the severe dust allergies were young, the doctor said that their bedding should not be dust catchers, like chenille. Nothing was said about content. I would imagine the quilting lines in a quilt could catch dust. I wouldn't worry about content as much as texture. Either a smooth surface or a quilt you can wash often. I'd go with the smooth on the bed and use the quilt for decor.

    As far as batting goes, it is encased in the fabric, so the only time you're exposed to dust is when you handle it. For that reason packaged would be better that buying from a bolt.

    The dust covers you buy for the mattress, springs and pillowcases are tightly woven cotton, so unless cotton was an allergen, it's not an issue.

    I would wash everything I bring into the house, but I do anyhow.

  6. #6
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    It's likely the "dust" being referred to is "house dust" which is made up of many things including skin cells, dander, pollens, mites, etc. etc.

    Cotton fabrics for your quilting should not bother you -- this from a 'same diagnosis patient' with a DD with the same diagnosis -- because you can wash these fabrics easily. Wash them as soon as you buy them. Store in closed containers or behind well-closed closet doors, with lavendar buds and cedar chips sewn into a little muslin bag in each container or shelf. Wash your quilts after you've made them. Keep them covered or wrapped in plastic between uses. (Plastic is NOT the best from a preservation point of view, but here we are discussing YOUR preservation!)

    If you are "allergic to everything", try to arrange to have your sewing space flooring of linoleum or hardwood so that it can be vacuumed, swept regularly, or damp mopped to pick up the lint and threads that collect from the craft. Use a Dustbuster to keep your cutting and sewing surface as free of lint/dust as possible.

    As I am also allergic, I find that polyesters and other synthetics are horrible for me because I am sensitive to petroleum products as well. I live on an antihistamine such as Claritin or generic or Zyrtec or generic, started this when I owned the quilt store and was told by my specialist in Dallas that it would NOT hurt me. I trade off between the two.

    NEVER give up your "good" fabrics for something like allergies to dust! Do whatever you can to stand against the threat of something so awful!! Never!
    Best to you,
    Jan in VA

  7. #7
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I'm allergic to almost everything too. Animals, foods, plants, trees you name it. I can't live my life in a bubble and refuse to give up things I love. I have 2 indoor only cats and one dog and thumb my nose at the doctor. I took shots for 2 years and I still have problems. I've just modified my life. They are no longer allowed in my bedroom. Compromise is everything. Unless you're so allergic to something you almost die, you can find ways to make your life work. I eat the foods that give me reactions in moderation and I wear a mask while gardening and shower quickly afterwards. Life goes on!!!

  8. #8
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    I did find I was allergic to almost everything. Dust mites, dogs, cats, molds, trees, weeds, alfalfa, feathers, you name it, it seems to be there. However, I was told they are mild allergies, so I think I will be okay. They did say not to let the dog sleep in my room. They do want me to try allergy shots.

    When I told my hubby, he says, well let's move to the country like we have talked about over the years. I said, we still have trees, weeds, dust, and whatever, and his reply, yes, but it is more open space and you probably would do just fine. I have always wanted some acreage, so maybe one day, we will take the plunge and do it.

    Glad to know I can still do what I want.

  9. #9
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Country life has more weeds, trees,grasses and pollen. It's not a good reason to move there. Move because you want to, not because it will help your allergies. Likely, it will make them worse.

  10. #10
    Super Member CoyoteQuilts's Avatar
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    Here is a site that will answer just about any question anybody has about allergies. Yeah, I work at an allergist office. Like most have said, allergies to pollens, dust, and dust mites are unavoidable. There is no way to make them disappear, you just have to decrease your exposure by HEPA filter air filters, frequent washing of linens, changing your furnace filters frequently, vacuuming more often and modify your gardening practices and the list can go on......

    Here is the site: http://www.aaaai.org/

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