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Thread: Is there a limit as to how ugly a charity quilt can be?

  1. #11
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    ugly is a personal thing- some things i think are just hidious you might absolutely love-
    as long as the fabrics are quality fabrics that will hold up- they are usable- check with the charity though- all those charities out there have their own (requirements/rules) concerning what is acceptable and what is not---mostly though they need to be cotton, washable, durable- functional- if you would not give it to someone you know-you should not give it to a stranger- they deserve the same consideration as anyone you know
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  2. #12
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    I like this.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  3. #13
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    I was given a flyer from a church group that was making baby quilts for their missionaries in third-world countries. They requested only simple quilts, washable fabrics and NO hand quilting - either tied or machine quilting - most of these quilts were washed in rivers and beaten on rocks.
    Nikki in MO

  4. #14
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    From My Own High Horse ... ( LOL )

    I wouldn't worry about fabric content.
    I would make sure it was sturdy enough to survive rough handling and machine washing/dryer.
    If it was obviously damaged - which includes stains and faded spots - I would not use it.
    If I wouldn't want to snuggle up under it, I would not donate it for use by people. I would donate it to a pet shelter. (I donate any quilts I'm not happy with to a local pet shelter.)

    I don't have to think it's pretty, but it does have to be a good quilt and well enough made. Taste varies from person to person. What I think is butt-ugly might be beautiful in somebody else's opinion (and vice versa).

    If it isn't good enough for me, a friend, or a relative, then it isn't good enough to send to a stranger to who I claim I want to demonstrate compassion and support.
    I Quilt, I Nap, I Quilt Some More ... Aaaaah, The Good Life!

    I also have an eddres you can use if you need to contact me with questions or suggestions that relate to our community: patricej@quiltingboard.com

  5. #15
    Super Member mary quilting's Avatar
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    I agree with you but might donate the ugly ones to an animal shelter
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I go by the rule of: I give charilty quilts that I wouldn't be ashamed to put my name on. The dogs go to the resale shop (Goodwill, St. Vincent, Salvation Army) where I figure customers can make their own choice if they want to buy it.

  6. #16
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    I think when you have virtually nothing then a quilt (no matter what color or pattern) might look beautiful. If you're sending these to third world countries then I'm not sure I would worry about beautiful and be more concerned with serviceable and warm. I'm not saying send ugly just look at them with different eyes and see how they would look to you if you had nothing. I've worked with the homeless here in the United States and most of them were not concerned with how things looked. They just wanted things that weren't worn out or dirty.

  7. #17
    Super Member wuv2quilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    I view my charity quilts just like any other quilt I would make. In my world, if that charity quilt is not good enough to give to a family memeber then it is not good enought for anyone else. I don't believe that people who need charity deserve second hand quality or any old thing.

    I'm with sewmary on this. Why would you "want" to give anyone something you yourself consider to be "ugly"?

    That being said, I do understand wanting to do the "Christian" thing, and provide for those in need. If you do your best, and give the best that you have....then there you are.

    Is the guild wanting to just use "whatever", and you don't agree....?
    Happiness is a form of travel...not a destination.

  8. #18
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    Our church group has found that the double knit quilts are actually very popular with the homeless! They don't absorb water like the cotton fabrics, and they clean up easily. We don't make quilts with a mix of fabric types though - too easily messed up during washing. There are cotton quilts and double knit quilts. The cotton ones get a poly batting (because that is what the woman who runs it likes and you do not argue!) while the double knits sometimes get a poly batt and sometimes don't. Alll get tied instead of quilted.

    I actually quit the group a while back because of a variation of "ugly" quilts. There was too much of an attitude of "if the poor/homeless/needy can't complain because it is free" to justify absolutely hideous quilts. The group gave our high school graduating seniors (5 or 6 of them) quilts made of random fabric types (cotton, polyester knits, and unknown) in 4" square, super cheap fleece back that was already pilling when they got it, with the edges serged instead of bound. The problem was also that the year before the seniors had received decent quilts - with coordinating colors and nicely bound.

    Pam

  9. #19
    Super Member wuv2quilt's Avatar
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    Should have finished reading ALL the posts

    In this instance, I agree with most of the others......make something that will hold up to "rough" conditions / use, and do what feels right to you.
    Happiness is a form of travel...not a destination.

  10. #20
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    If the fabric is too "ugly" for quilts to be sent to Third World Countries, then consider the
    Sleeping Bag Project. Info is at: http://www.uglyquilts.org/

    This organization wants deliberately made ugly quilts.

    I was offended when I first heard of these quilts. That is, until I read about their program.

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