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Thread: Is there some magic spell or fairy dust that'll help with free motion quilting?

  1. #101
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    Aussiequilter, and others, thanks for being so supportive. I expected it to require practice, but I can't even imagine getting to a point that I'd be able to start quilting my waiting tops. It helps to know I'm not alone, and I'll be using the tips here, except the ones that involve chemical mood enhancers. I can see how FMQ would drive one to that, though. I'd just give up, but if so many others can do it, it must be possible.

  2. #102
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    you said you finally figured out the pressure foot setting to use. I drop my dog feet and use a FM foot that does not use any presser. Maybe I'm just not reading right tonight.

  3. #103
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    i STARTED TAKING A FMQ CLASS AND SHE SUGGESTS MAKING AND PRACTICING ON 15 SANDWICHES OF BLACK SO YOU CAN SEE YOUR STITCHES. aLSO YOU NEED TO PRACTICE MIN A DAY AS IT TRAINS THE BRAIN. jUST DOING DOODLES AND ZENTANGLES HELPS YOU TO GET THE MOVEMENTS. iT TAKES 50 HOURS OF PRACTICE TO GET USED TO fmq AND 500 HOURS TO BECOME PROFICIENT IS HER MOTTO AS S HE HAS SEEN OTHERS SAY. sTICH LENGTH WILL COME IN TIME AND YOU CANT BE PERFECT. iF YOU TRY TO BE PERFECT YOU WILL NOT ENJOY THE PROCESS.

    JEFF

  4. #104
    Super Member Kappy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarbZ
    Quote Originally Posted by rob529
    What do you mean about turning machine around to face you? To me facing means like you have it when you are sewing. Do you mean having the end of the machine by the needle face you? I need all the help and then more so I want to make sure I am getting this right.
    Thanks!
    Robin in TX


    Turn your machine around to face you. When you look at FMQ set ups like the Flynn or the HQ Sweet Sixteen or the Easy Quilter Track System, the machines are all facing you.
    Yes turn it so the needle end is facing you. My husband made me a table to go around it and I have a silicon mat and sprayed pledge on the table top and it works slick. There is a tutorial on hand made quilt tabletops that is really good. Go to search and type in handmade quilting table and i think it will come up. Good luck.
    Go to google and type in homemade quilt table, it should be the first one on the list and it takes you back to this quilting board, but when I did a search on this board it did not come up. So try google. If I knew how to get the link here I would, but when it comes to some of the simple things a computer can do, I don't know how to do them!

  5. #105
    Super Member Debbie B's Avatar
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    If you go to search at the top of the page and type in homemade quilting table you will see a picture.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kappy
    Quote Originally Posted by BarbZ
    Quote Originally Posted by rob529
    What do you mean about turning machine around to face you? To me facing means like you have it when you are sewing. Do you mean having the end of the machine by the needle face you? I need all the help and then more so I want to make sure I am getting this right.
    Thanks!
    Robin in TX


    Turn your machine around to face you. When you look at FMQ set ups like the Flynn or the HQ Sweet Sixteen or the Easy Quilter Track System, the machines are all facing you.
    Yes turn it so the needle end is facing you. My husband made me a table to go around it and I have a silicon mat and sprayed pledge on the table top and it works slick. There is a tutorial on hand made quilt tabletops that is really good. Go to search and type in handmade quilting table and i think it will come up. Good luck.
    Go to google and type in homemade quilt table, it should be the first one on the list and it takes you back to this quilting board, but when I did a search on this board it did not come up. So try google. If I knew how to get the link here I would, but when it comes to some of the simple things a computer can do, I don't know how to do them!

  6. #106
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    Have you tried using contact paper?
    1 You draw the design that you want on the paper side of the contact paper. You can cut it in strips, squares, circles or large pieces.

    2. Slowly take off the backing and gradually adhere it to the quilt. Then using the darning foot with the feet down, sew through the written pattern into the quilt.

    3. When finished, gently rip away the contact paper that was adhered to the quilt. You will then see the pattern sewn into the quilt. Tweezers are helpful in removing little bits of paper.

    You will get used to moving the material and you will soon be able to do it on your own without using the contact paper. Btw, using those rubber-tipped gloves so your fingers don't get sore. They are called "fingerlings" or something like that. It only took me a couple of practices with contact paper and then I found it much easier to do. Humming helps to keep you from grinding your teeth, biting your lips, etc. I used to sing "around and around and around I go."

  7. #107
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    Have you tried using contact paper?
    1 You draw the design that you want on the paper side of the contact paper. You can cut it in strips, squares, circles or large pieces.

    2. Slowly take off the backing and gradually adhere it to the quilt. Then using the darning foot with the feet down, sew through the written pattern into the quilt.

    3. When you are done, pull off the paper with the written design and you will see that you have sewn the design onto the quilt. Pull off the paper, using fingers or tweezers

    4. This method gets you used to moving the material without jerking it around. I did it a couple times and then did FMQ with no paper, just using my hands and moving material. The gloves rubber-tips called Fingerlings help. It also helps to sing or hum to keep from being so intense that your grind or bite your lip.

    Have fun.

  8. #108
    Senior Member JoyVoltenburg's Avatar
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    get a good rhythm - don't get discouraged by every bobble in your stitching - and keep practicing. Also practice the designs over and over on paper or dry erase board... kind of like practicing cursive writing in grade school (do they even do that anymore?).

  9. #109
    Senior Member Up4BigChal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsdelvis
    I'm using a Pfaff Creative 1471. I finally figured out the presser foot setting to use - it's surely not clear in the manual! :? I've scoured the internet sites and youtube for help with FMQ.

    Basically they all pretty much say to practice every day for 2 years and you might eventually get the hang of it. I think you must also have to hold your tongue right, turn your fingers into rubber, and mindmeld with the machine.

    My hardest things to conquer are regulating speed, stitch length, and a wonky bobbin thread that wants to peek thru the top.

    Any hints or words of wisdom?
    Yep Enjoy a glass of wine or a beer then when your all nice and relaxed WhaaLaa so they tell me anyway

    :P

  10. #110
    Senior Member PghPat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stitchofclass2
    I also learned from a video or someone on the Board to cut out the front of my quilting/darning foot. Mine has red marks on each side so I used a "cut off" tool (for jewelry) and cut out the front. What a difference! Couldn't believe that I could see that much better. Yolanda Wood River
    Yolanda, could you possibly post a picture of what your "cut off" darning foot looks like? I know I can get mine cut off but don't want to ruin it by cutting it wrong.

    Thanks! Pat

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