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Thread: Thought I was Nuts!

  1. #1
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    Thought I was Nuts!

    I'm making a table topper, and the pattern says to cut one 8" square and bisect it twice for setting corners. Also cut two 5 5/8 squares and bisect once for 4 triangles. I thought I cut everything right, but the triangles were the same size, so I re-cut the 8" block, and they were still the same size!!
    After taking out my trusty calculator and figuring how big they should be, lo and behold THEY ARE THE SAME!!!
    Could have knocked me over with a feather. Why didnt' they just tell me to cut two 8"blocks and bisect twice, and I would have have the 8 triangles I needed.
    Okay, I'm finished, but thought you might like to know.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 09-14-2012 at 03:45 AM.

  2. #2
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    One is a half square triangle the other is a quarter square triangle, I hope this link explains it to you
    http://www.eliqg.com/documents/Triangles_Part1.pdf
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  3. #3
    MTS
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    It's all a matter of controlling where the bias edges end up and having the straight edges on the OUTSIDE of the quilt (or block).

    When you cut the setting triangles (aka QST - quarter square triangles), the two BIAS edges (two shorter sides) of each triangle will end up on the INSIDE of your quilt with the one STRAIGHT edge on the OUTSIDE.

    When you cut the corner triangles (aka HST - half square triangles), the one BIAS edge (longest side) of each triangle will be on the INSIDE of your quilt with the two STRAIGHT edges on the OUTSIDE.

    Even though the cut triangles might be the same size, each is intended for a different position in the quilt (or block).

    Now you know.
    It's a good thing.
    Last edited by MTS; 09-13-2012 at 10:40 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
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    Humm that makes sense.

  5. #5
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS View Post
    It's all a matter of controlling where the bias edges end up and having the straight edges on the OUTSIDE of the quilt (or block).

    When you cut the setting triangles (aka QST - quarter square triangles), the two BIAS edges (two shorter sides) of each triangle will end up on the INSIDE of your quilt with the one STRAIGHT edge on the OUTSIDE.

    When you cut the corner triangles (aka HST - half square triangles), the one BIAS edge (longest side) of each triangle will be on the INSIDE of your quilt with the two STRAIGHT edges on the OUTSIDE.

    Even though the cut triangles might be the same size, each is intended for a different position in the quilt (or block).

    Now you know.
    It's a good thing.
    Thank you for the explanation. It's good to know the "why" of things--now I know why and I won't forget "how"!
    Bernie

  6. #6
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    Sometimes the instructions are not written as well as they should be, either.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
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  7. #7
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    This is the bias edge thing is part of the reason for the Nifty Notions Half Square and Quarter Square rulers. They eliminate the need for cutting different size squares because you can cut both of those triangles from the same size strip.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  8. #8
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    Maybe the attached drawings might help illustrate the difference -

    Pretend the lines of the graph paper are the threads of the fabric -

    The sizes of the triangles are the same - but the grain lines on the longest edge change
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  9. #9
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    See, now I wouldn't have even thought there was a good reason. lol bearisgray, thanks for the visual help!!
    Dorian

    If you've met one child with Autism, you've met ONE child with Autism.

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