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Thread: what batting should i choose ?

  1. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honey58 View Post
    Where I live, the climate is similar to that of Florida in the USA..
    while on a short visit here I need to buy batting for 2 queen size quilts..never bought any as these are my first attempts..please suggest what batting I must buy as our winters are short and not too cold .
    also will probably be washing them at the end of each winter before putting them away coz its dusty..besides little g'kids, dogs & cats lay claim to our beds ...and hearts
    oh ..another pt.. will hv to hand quilt..a simple stitch in the ditch is all i will be able to do.
    and a heartfelt " thank you " in advance for any suggestions given.

    For the type of climate you are describing, and for the hand quilting, I would probably recommend Quilter's Dream Poly. It has gotten many favorable reviews here, is lightweight, and machine washes easily. Maybe Google and search here for more info on it. This is not a batting that I personally have used, but it seems to suit your needs. My second choice recommendation would be Quilters Dream cotton request weight. This is good for hand quilting, would not be too heavy or warm, but gives a somewhat flatter appearance to the quilt.

    My favorite battings are Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon 100% cotton, but I do not recommend it for hand quilting because of drag on the needle. I also like Hobbs 80/20, and that would be my third choice for you. However, I think it might be overly warm for your climate. It's a nice soft batting with moderate loft and is easy to hand needle.

    I personally would *not* use Warm and Natural. It is needlepunched through scrim, and the scrim makes hand needling more difficult. Also, it is a dense batting that may not be suitable for your climate, and it is a stiffer batting that does not drape as well as the others mentioned.

  2. #12
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    I use Warm & Natural and hand quilt. I don't have an issue with it but it is difficult to do stitch in the ditch but I think that's the case no matter which batting. I like natural fibers (cotton/wool/silk) as they breathe and can be used year round. I do not have a made-by-me quilt on my bed at this point, but all my bed coverings are 100% cotton and I do not change them during the course of the year. They keep us warm in the winter and cool in the summer. That said, some people I have gifted quilts to say they are a bit heavy/warm for summer with the W&N batting. A friend uses Quilters Dream 100% cotton. Does have a nicer drape at the outset - not sure about after washing if there's really much of a difference. Just my 2 cents.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltsRfun View Post
    How about using flannel as batting? Just a thought.
    I like the 'Loft' [if its the rt word ?? ] height ?? a batting would give. thanks.

  4. #14
    Senior Member RUSewing's Avatar
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    I like Warm and Natural for machine quilting, but my friend who hand quilts likes/loves wool. Expensive, yes, but a small price compared to the hours spent piecing and quilting.
    ~~ Butterflies can't see their wings.
    They can't see how truly beautiful they are,
    but everyone else can. People are kinda like that. ~~

  5. #15
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    Thank you to all.. hv got many suggestions ..now will go look at each of these in the stores
    [remember its all new to me ] & figure it out .. am VERY excited to be reaching the 'next' stage in the process .
    feel if I actually complete my first quilt, I'll get more motivated.

  6. #16
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    a thin poly is easy to quilt and warm. I do admire those who can hand quilt warm an natural batting. I just don't want the aggrivation of the density of trying to hand quilt it.

  7. #17
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    I buy the thinnest batt that I can find = it's called something like thinsulate - it's a thin poly
    Mountain Mist makes a thin cotton which I use if I want an all cotton quilt.

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