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Thread: What do you think need to be taught?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
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    I was wondering what type of need do you think there is for classroom classes? I enjoy designing and making both art and traditional quilts and clothing. I want to approach a local quilt store and submit an idea for a class, but I don't know where to start.
    1. I would like your feedback on your own personal interests.
    2. I would like your feedback on the following areas: Part #1 Creating designs to modify an existing jacket pattern. Part#2 Inserting medallions in a jacket using paper piecing techniques.
    The photos are of a jacket I made using a pattern, but I thought the short style might not be good.

    Front of jacket
    Name:  Attachment-57021.jpe
Views: 8
Size:  58.3 KB

    Back of jacket
    Name:  Attachment-57022.jpe
Views: 12
Size:  87.0 KB

  2. #2
    Senior Member OdessaQuilts's Avatar
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    Well, I think your jacket is just lovely. I would happily take a class on that!

    I personally would think if you have a sample to hang, you could likely get more students. And I agree that a little longer style might attract more students. I would be interested in both learing how to modify a pattern to accommodate this type of pattern AND how to insert patterns like this using paper piecing.

    I believe you are on the right track. Make sure that you have a clear idea of how long each step would take to teach/accomplish as the shop will likely ask that info to know how to market your class. I'd also recommend that you attempt to teach these classes in a local community education setting.

    Your photo shows a very stylish piece. Good luck with it. Let us know how it goes!

  3. #3
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    It's beautiful -

    I would like a jacket that was at least about mid-thigh length -

    More room to show off that fantastic piecing - also I have a broad beam and short jackets make it look worse!


  4. #4
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    It is a lovely jacket. I also recommend the longer length. I would also encourage you to try and make the batting or other filler as thin as possible, maybe flanelette. That helps with drapability and is more flattering to those of us with more mature figures.

    I remember taking my then early teen daughter to a big quilt show with me in Lancaster, PA. She kept rolling her eyes everytime we saw a lady in a quilted jacket. Her words were, " Mom, those puffy jackets don't look good on "ladies".
    I will admit that I agreed with her that many of the real woman who were not size 6 or lower did not look their best in a bulky quilted jacket.

  5. #5
    Senior Member yourstrulyquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky
    I was wondering what type of need do you think there is for classroom classes? I enjoy designing and making both art and traditional quilts and clothing. I want to approach a local quilt store and submit an idea for a class, but I don't know where to start.
    1. I would like your feedback on your own personal interests.
    2. I would like your feedback on the following areas: Part #1 Creating designs to modify an existing jacket pattern. Part#2 Inserting medallions in a jacket using paper piecing techniques.
    The photos are of a jacket I made using a pattern, but I thought the short style might not be good.
    The need for new and different classes is an ongoing process in a quilt shop. Look at the class schedule to see if what you want to teach is being offered or not. Decide what you would like to teach, make samples in a variety of colors and, in the case of your beautiful jacket, lengths. Learn ALL the tricks and shortcuts and be able to put it together in your sleep! If a student asks "why this" or "why that" you need to be able to answer with confidence, and in order to do that you need to know all the loopholes.
    Then you can approach the quilt shop owner, or her Class Organizer, and sell yourself first, by being well dressed, groomed and poised. The owner needs to see your work and you need to present it with total confidence and some authority. I say some, because you don't want to overshadow the boss! If she asks you questions, again, you need to be prepared to answer with clarity and confidence. It would help if you frequented the quilt shop for awhile before you actually approached the owner. They kinda like to know you spend a little money there, and if you have a friendly relationship with the clerks and the owner would ask if any of them knew you, they could answer appropriately. And in talking with the clerks, you may actually get some ideas about what is needed in that particular shop. I hope this helps.

    YTQ










  6. #6
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    I really like the just a couple of inches below waist line. This is stunning and I wish I could get out to take classes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
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    Your right! I made this mistake many years ago. The jacket posted used flannel as a batting.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
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    I understand, that is why I'm sensitive to promoting the pattern I used. Also if I get into fitting patterns, that would be a lesson in itself. Fortunately for me, I don't have this problem.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
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    Thanks for your input. I appreciate your thoughts.

  10. #10
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I think it's wonderful that you're considering teaching. I'm a little disappointed in the range of classes offered by the local quilts stores. Bringing in "new talent" could greatly increase the number of students taking classes.

    I'm usually motivated to take a class when it presents a new technique. Right now I'm looking for classes on landscape quilting, or other types of art quilts. I've done some paper piecing but might take another class if it included more complicated designs, as yours does.

    Your jacket is beautiful, but sadly I wouldn't be interested in the class because I'm not interested in making garments, especially if it involves altering patterns. I think you may find that's typical of many quilters, so if you intend to teach several courses it might be good to have some that don't involve garment sewing. On the other hand, you might find a real niche in the market by offering jacket classes, even your own quilted jacket patterns.

    What part of Oregon are you in? I'm in Albany.

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