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Thread: Why do you paper piece?

  1. #51
    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandyQuilter View Post
    The Mariner's Compass has been hand pieced accurately without paper piecing for years. Any shape, no matter how small can be hand pieced. However, how many now feel that PP is the only way to be accurate and not stretch the fabric? That's simply not true. I'm now PP some blocks, but still prefer to hand piece. You also do not need to starch fabric to be accurate. I started teaching quilting in the mid-70s after teaching myself how to quilt and written three books on how to do it. Now, obviously, the rotary cutter and other wonderful rulers are terrific innovations, but nothing beats being accurate with cutting, maintaining an even 1/4 inch seam--whether by hand or machine--and careful pressing.
    I've been reading comments about how starch keeps the fabric stiff and makes piecing accurate. In my estimation, it's time wasted when I could be piecing. The trick is to spend time learning how to handle the fabric so that it doesn't stretch. I apologize in advance if I've ruffled some feathers, but I've wanted to say this for some time, especially for new beginners. Perhaps the answer is that what is successful for you is what you should do. But I want to get to a accurate, finished product as simply and quickly as possible with the minimum of fuss.
    SandyQuilter
    You must be in agreement with Sally Collins, whose books espouse the same dedication to precision piecing - she does a lot of 3" blocks without paper. I think she said anybody can be accurate the paper-piecing way - I guess that is a two-sided comment depending on your viewpoint.
    SueSew
    "If it's messy, eat it over the sink!" Mom

  2. #52
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhivequilter View Post
    Is paper piecing the same thing as Foundation quilting?
    This is the subject of another active thread on this board, and this was my answer there:

    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    In a nutshell, paper piecing is when you use a layer of paper to stabilize the blocks, and you remove the paper when you're done. Foundation piecing is using a layer of fabric (such as muslin) to stabilize the blocks, you stitch the patches directly on it, and it is left in the quilt permanently.
    Here's the thread, in case you'd like to read the other comments:
    Paper peicing

  3. #53
    Super Member sewingladydi's Avatar
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    For accuracy-the points are so crisp and sharp.

  4. #54
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
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    Paper piecing is to me like putting my head in a vice and tightening it! I did it once and thought I would go nuts. It is all individual. My sister-in-law absolutely loves it. HOWEVER, I am going to watch the tutorial that Linda sent and see if I can change my mind in the least bit
    "Worry is about doing something you can do nothing about."

  5. #55
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    I have never paper-pieced, but it seems like it would be tedious and you need a lot of patience. Maybe that is why some people don't like it. I might like to try, I just dont know if I have the patience...maybe if I were making a small quilt.

  6. #56
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    Interesting. I wondered if anyone was of this opinion. I am mostly self-taught over the past 15-20 years. Eleanor Burns quilt-in-a-day books was my start. I have not done anything too fancy. I did start out with a rotary cutter, though. But, for years I did not even know what a bias was, it never even occurred to me to use starch or sizing, I was taught to always prewash, I never heard of precuts, etc.

    I have been reading this board for a year ot two and have learned a lot! It is always fun to try different techniques to see if you like it. Right now I am experimenting with precuts, not prewashing, different battings, different basting methods, more modern patterns, etc.

    Although, I must say, because of reading this board (which I love), I find myself stressing or questioning myself over a technique that has been working efficiently and well for me for years. I call it "information overload".

    I agree with you about finishing a quilt accurately, simply, and efficiently as possible....having fun and enjoying the whole process.

    Quote Originally Posted by SandyQuilter View Post
    The Mariner's Compass has been hand pieced accurately without paper piecing for years. Any shape, no matter how small can be hand pieced. However, how many now feel that PP is the only way to be accurate and not stretch the fabric? That's simply not true. I'm now PP some blocks, but still prefer to hand piece. You also do not need to starch fabric to be accurate. I started teaching quilting in the mid-70s after teaching myself how to quilt and written three books on how to do it. Now, obviously, the rotary cutter and other wonderful rulers are terrific innovations, but nothing beats being accurate with cutting, maintaining an even 1/4 inch seam--whether by hand or machine--and careful pressing.
    I've been reading comments about how starch keeps the fabric stiff and makes piecing accurate. In my estimation, it's time wasted when I could be piecing. The trick is to spend time learning how to handle the fabric so that it doesn't stretch. I apologize in advance if I've ruffled some feathers, but I've wanted to say this for some time, especially for new beginners. Perhaps the answer is that what is successful for you is what you should do. But I want to get to a accurate, finished product as simply and quickly as possible with the minimum of fuss.
    SandyQuilter
    Last edited by Denise S; 01-27-2012 at 12:26 PM.

  7. #57
    Senior Member QUILT4JOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    Certain levels of piecing can ONLY be acheivied with PP. Go here to see what I am talking about
    http://www.silverliningsoriginals.com/
    thank you feline fanatic. Wonderful site and I ordered the vellum. Can't wait to try it.
    there are no mistakes, there's only a change of plan

  8. #58
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    Wow! http://www.silverliningsoriginals.com/ This website shows some really intricate quilts with small pieces. I can see how this level of piecing would need the paper piecing. It looks very challenging.

  9. #59
    Member calmarek's Avatar
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    When paper piecing, you print the block pattern directly onto paper and then have to tear the paper off when your blocks are done. It is much easier to remove the paper if you use a size 14 sewing machine needle and a smaller stitch lengh (like 2.0).

    When you foundation piece, you print the block pattern onto a foundation instead of paper. You can use muslin (backed by freezer paper so it will feed through your printer), or you can buy foundation sheets made by June Taylor from JoAnns. They are very lightweight and similar to dryer sheets -- and I always use a coupon of course! I have used both methods and very much prefer the foundation sheets. Besides mariner's compass, this method is also great for the Pineapple pattern!

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