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Thread: Workshop Jitters

  1. #31
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    I don't get nervous but I never accomplish much in workshops. I work alone and usually in a quiet mode; no TV, etc. I am easily distracted when in class. I try to take notes and then do the task at home.

  2. #32
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    Gail G I am the same as you. I have a hard time sewing and doing when I am not at home. I don't know what the problem is but I have the same feelings.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  3. #33
    Senior Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    I love the idea of taking "in progress" pictures to record the process.

    I've been to lots of classes. How I approach the class depends upon how challenging it is & how long (1/2 day to 5 days) it is. For less than 6 hours, I choose a goal for the class. When that's reached, I succeeded in getting from the class what I wanted to learn. Now that I'm teaching, I ask the students to write down a goal. When we discuss it at the end of class, I'm surprised. At a FM class, the supply list clearly stated to bring a machine you're familiar with. A student's goal was to get familiar with her machine during class. She was perfectly happy with her success on her machine even though she only did about 1/3 of the class activities.

    A friend processes the instructions slowly so she gets further and further behind. She's struggling with how to take a class. She comes to my house for a week & picks my brain. She's much happier with a mentor.

    I've taken several 5 day workshops-intensive and definitely challenging. I have found that by the second day, I'm ready to give up my preconceived ideas and go with the flow. I learn what I can and finish when I get home. Oh and I've taken 8 plastic tubs of fabric in my van and still didn't have what I needed. So now, if at all in doubt, I contact the instructor to clarify what she meant.

    For "sit and sews", I take something I can mindlessly work on while I chat, such as binding or quilting an allover pattern.

    Everyone is different and as adults we have lots of experiences that have gotten us to different places from other people. This is a hobby. Do what fits you.

    I ask myself, "Is this going to Padukah. No. So it's good enough in my book."

  4. #34
    Senior Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    Just thought of another friend who is distracted easily. If she's in the mood to study/sew, she picks a spot in the room that is somewhat isolated and doesn't look at other people in class. Sometimes, she's happy with seeing what everyone else is doing and doing very little on her own.

  5. #35
    Super Member earthwalker's Avatar
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    I'm with Patrice. Try to enjoy...workshops are not designed to be torture sessions. Don't judge yourself harshly, just relax and go with an open mind....there will always be people who "get" it faster/better than you and always someone slower...'tis the way of the world. So as one of my best friends always quotes "Courage brother, do not stumble" - or in this case "Courage quilter, do not stumble"....Go forth, create and have fun

  6. #36
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
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    DottyMo made a really good point about the volume in the classes. When my son was 11 we went to Cancun and to the Rainforest Cafe. We had never been to one, and got to experience the animals moving and the sounds of the jungle. We sat and ordered, and as is often true in Mexico, the order took a while. My son started getting antzy and wanted to go--we had ordered and I told him we would get it in a few minutes--my usually calm composed son, burst out crying. He couldn't take that much stimulation. Sometimes we have some issues that just don't come up until something like your class comes around. I'd suggest ear plugs. They don't have to be obvious. Even filtering out a bit of the noise might be enough to let you relax. Usually you can still hear the teacher, but if you can't, tell her why you are trying the earplugs, and if she would just touch you on the shoulder, or come stand near you, so you can take them out and listen to her instruction. Most teachers want you to succeed, and will work with you on these small things that help to make a good class.

    I've also had a class recently where I got the pattern early. Well, I chose my fabrics, and sewed and cut out part of the project. It was far from finished. If I didn't think I understood, I would stop, but sometimes getting a jump on the class gives you a head start, and puts less pressure on you to preform. Try to figure out what is making you so nervous, and see if there is a work around.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    As in all group settings where you (me) think we are going to be judged we get nervous and feel inferior to what others can do.

    NO FEAR HERE! I made a choice to not care about what othesr think about my work. The more mistakes I make in the class the funnier I got and the more fun I have. I do go to classes to learn, not be perfect. If I make a mistake, well, duh! I'm learning.

    Many years ago I attended a class by Nancy Halpren. I never finished the project because I couldn't draw a straight line around a template, nor could I keep a sharp point on the pencil I was using. I was told I was unteachable and look at me now. I think I make rather nice quilts, Some are a little wonky, some stranges colors and funky quilting. I love them and have no fear of what any one wants to say.

    Go with joy!
    peace

    Over the years I have learned that quilters are so affriad of their own work and it not being up to 'standards'.

    I just love the doing, mistakes and all!
    Oh, it really frosts my cookies when a teacher says someone is unteachable. That just means the teacher is a poor teacher! It is my job as a teacher to explain things to the student in a way that they understand. That's what you pay the teacher for! If you aren't understanding then I need to reword my instructions in such a way as to make the lightbulb go off in your head. Different people learn in different ways and at different speeds. That's what you pay the teacher for!

    That being said, don't try to compare yourself to anyone and if you start feeling stressed out, just stop sewing for a while and watch! If you enjoy the people you are taking the class with you'll still have a great time. However, if everyone in the room is a total stranger you might want to take a pass until you get your confidence up.

    Taking some practice fabric was a very good idea Patrice, I'll remember that one for myself. I usually only get stressed in a class if I've spent a lot of money on the fabric (or it's a favorite I've held onto for a long time) and making a practice quilt is a great idea!

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