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Thread: "Design wall"

  1. #21
    Junior Member Lioness3xs's Avatar
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    Here's what I do with cement block walls and a quilting design wall.

    I bought the large 3M plastic wall anchors. I stuck them to the wall about 3 inches below what would be the ceiling or floor joists and 12 inches apart. Next I bought flannel backed rectangle plastic table cloths. I folded down one edge of the shorter side of the table cloth. I then sewed button holes running the length of the buttonhole parrell with the edge of the table cloth. By running them this way it will allow for ease when hanging and if you are off a bit it won't matter. Then simply hang up the table cloth with the buttonholes slipped over the 3M hook.

    I made a new table cloth for each of my current projecgts. I tend to have 3-4 going all the time, so it's easy to hang up just the one I want to work on.

    Other benefits that I find works well with this notion.

    I like to go to retreats and this makes transportation very easy and at all the sites there hasn't been and issue with applying 3M hooks to the walls which are easily removed when time to leave.

    Also before transport, I add a few pins to the top portion of fabric pieces to keep them in place when unfurling and hanging up a project.

    Spray basting smaller projects directly on the design wall makes it much easier for repositioning than laying it out on the floor and the spray basting adds to the stickiness of the flannel of the table cloth.

    If the tablecloth looses it's tackiness, add more basting spray.


    I've also cut the table cloths into 1.5 by 2 foot pieces, for laying out a new block and carrying them all to the sewing machine to keep them in order.

    Watch for sales of table cloths at the end of various holidays. For $1 you'll have a great sewing aid.
    Quilted Blessings

    If you can't notice it on a galloping horse at 60 feet, it's just fine.

  2. #22
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    LIONESS - thanks - I understood your directions perfectly.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member ksdot417's Avatar
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    My DH made me a portable design wall that I can move anywhere in the basement - it's on wheels. It uses the foamular insulation boards from Lowe's. It has panels on the front and back of the base that slide off and can be leaned against a wall side by side when I'm working on a larger project. I have Fons & Porter's design wall taped to to front of both sections and plan to put a darker flannel on the backs so they will be reversible. It works great for me.

  4. #24
    Member bettyboop32953's Avatar
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    I use an inexpensive flannel backed tablecloth tacked to the wall. A friend of my built a design wall with a foam insulation/acoustic board covered with car overhead liner fabric. Our local Hancock's carries a wide variety of colors. Since her sewing room is in the old dining room, her husband built a frame around it. She used a grey colored liner.
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  5. #25
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lioness3xs View Post
    Here's what I do with cement block walls and a quilting design wall.

    I bought the large 3M plastic wall anchors. I stuck them to the wall about 3 inches below what would be the ceiling or floor joists and 12 inches apart. Next I bought flannel backed rectangle plastic table cloths. I folded down one edge of the shorter side of the table cloth. I then sewed button holes running the length of the buttonhole parrell with the edge of the table cloth. By running them this way it will allow for ease when hanging and if you are off a bit it won't matter. Then simply hang up the table cloth with the buttonholes slipped over the 3M hook.

    I made a new table cloth for each of my current projecgts. I tend to have 3-4 going all the time, so it's easy to hang up just the one I want to work on.

    Other benefits that I find works well with this notion.

    I like to go to retreats and this makes transportation very easy and at all the sites there hasn't been and issue with applying 3M hooks to the walls which are easily removed when time to leave.

    Also before transport, I add a few pins to the top portion of fabric pieces to keep them in place when unfurling and hanging up a project.

    Spray basting smaller projects directly on the design wall makes it much easier for repositioning than laying it out on the floor and the spray basting adds to the stickiness of the flannel of the table cloth.

    If the tablecloth looses it's tackiness, add more basting spray.


    I've also cut the table cloths into 1.5 by 2 foot pieces, for laying out a new block and carrying them all to the sewing machine to keep them in order.

    Watch for sales of table cloths at the end of various holidays. For $1 you'll have a great sewing aid.
    Lioness, I really appreciate your ideas. However, your last idea helps me the most:

    " ... cut the table cloths into 1.5 by 2 foot pieces, for laying out a new block and carrying them all to the sewing machine to keep them in order."

    My design wall will be in a back bedroom, out of the way, so having smaller pieces of flannel backed tablecloth I can lay out a row of quilt blocks, roll it up and take it to my sewing machine.

    I often get turned around from my original ideas. Your idea should help straighten me out! Thanks!

  6. #26
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    I've been contemplating how to make a design wall the least expensive way possible. Found some BRILLIANT ideas here! I think I'm going to try the vinyl tablecloth first. I just bought one the other day so I'll be tacking it up on the wall when I get home tonight! Thanks ladies!!!

  7. #27
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    Wow, love to see photos of your design wall.

    Lots of great idea thanks quilters.

    Quote Originally Posted by ksdot417 View Post
    My DH made me a portable design wall that I can move anywhere in the basement - it's on wheels. It uses the foamular insulation boards from Lowe's. It has panels on the front and back of the base that slide off and can be leaned against a wall side by side when I'm working on a larger project. I have Fons & Porter's design wall taped to to front of both sections and plan to put a darker flannel on the backs so they will be reversible. It works great for me.
    ♥ Craftybear♥ Google Goddess Surfing Queen of Links ♥
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  8. #28
    Senior Member nstitchs's Avatar
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    Design Wall

    I used hollow core doors and sprayed them with adhesive and covered them with flannel and hinged them together. They work awesome and fold up when not in use.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  9. #29
    Senior Member lonestardreams's Avatar
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    I don't have a design wall yet but have been talking to my husband about it. Time for us to put our thoughts together and decide what to do. There are some great ideas here.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Cagey's Avatar
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    My quilting room is in the basement too. My hubby got two interior doors (hollow core) and put the two long ends together with brackets on the sides. Then he put large eye screws on the end and hung it from the ceiling beams with chains.
    It makes a great design board and if I need a larger area on my table for basting, I just take it off the chains and lay it on the table.

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