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Thread: "Thanks" vs "Thank you" and "You are welcome" vs "No problem"

  1. #1
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    "Thanks" vs "Thank you" and "You are welcome" vs "No problem"

    "Thanks" vs "Thank you" and "You are welcome" vs "No problem"

    The above is definitely not on any Top Ten List of Critical Matters - but

    I prefer "Thank you for the _______" to "Thanks for the _______"

    and "You are welcome" to "No problem."

    Anyone else have opinions on this?

    (Assuming, of course, that people remember to acknowledge a gift, favor, or extra effort! I prefer ANY acknowledgement to none!)

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I agree, it's like "love ya" verses "I love you" I do not like shorthand speaking or writing. say it plainly and meaningfully and spell it out, there should be no miscommunication!

  3. #3
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    I think some of that can be blamed on phone 'texting'. People get so accustomed to making messages brief within the limits, that it is passing over to everyday life. I very rarely send a text message, and then only to my son...so thankfully! it has not rubbed off on me. I see sooo many words abbreviated to the extent you can hardly recognize the words. The other reason is just pure laziness in "speak". Donchathink? lol

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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Most definitely, but for some reason,be it t.v., internet, texting, what ever. People are changing the face of the English language. Soon we wont' recognize it!! I just try to close my ears!

  5. #5
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    Language is changing all the time. It's the nature of the beast.
    I don't mind the shorthand as long as I know what it means.
    Thank you, thanks or thx...as long as I know what was meant, I'm fine with it.

  6. #6
    Super Member carrieg's Avatar
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    'No problem' is the one that bugs me a little. We teach our toddlers to say 'you're welcome', but then we don't say it.
    Carol in Michigan

  7. #7
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I don't mind most things, but no problem seems not the right response to thank you. New words are added to the dictionary all the time, so I guess times change and language changes. We surely don't speak like folks did in the 1800s!!
    Alyce

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    "Thank you" for the first occurrence in a message, then "thanks" is permissible within the same message.

    The problem with "No problem" is that in current usage it has lost its specific meaning: when you really do want to convey the sentiment that your effort wasn't a problem for you (Jamaicans get a pass); similar to "what's up?" which used to mean "you wanted my attention?" - it's now (drearily) used for "hello."

    Do Brits still think "You're welcome" is strange?
    Last edited by Manalto; 08-22-2015 at 12:54 PM.

  9. #9
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    I would say in this day and age "thanks" and "no problem" is better than nothing at all.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

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    Thanks or Thank You is better than nothing!

  11. #11
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    If it's a gift, or something I've done which required a bit of effort, I'll usually say, "You're very welcome." If I've done a favor for someone, I'll usually use the 'no problem' response. Why? Because I prefer to downplay the effort to myself, in that circumstance.
    Neesie


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  12. #12
    Super Member juneayerza's Avatar
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    This is an age old battle about the use of formal vs everyday use. And usually the people of the "next generation" are the ones who change things around. I'm sure someone from the 1800's wouldn't begin to recognize the way we talk today as the American English they knew.

    I remember a comment from a friend when I was in Australia a long time ago about how the young people were so impolite in the shops because they said 'Ta' instead of Thank You. The last time she was here visiting me she was saying 'Ta' all over the place. It just goes to show you how we get use to things.
    June

  13. #13
    Super Member Bluelady's Avatar
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    I use Thanks as an informal Thank you, with friends and family. It is a happy friendly way. I use Thank You in a more formal setting, mostly work emails. It feels very formal and, well, stuffy, to me. But "thanks" at work is too informal.

  14. #14
    Junior Member FiveseveN's Avatar
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    Thanks and thank you depends on lot of factors such as situation, reason for, and depth of gratitude, an to whom I am speaking. I use no problem, because I get shy when people thank me. *shrugs*
    If I had ambition, I would be dangerous. Alas, I am harmless (and annoying) as a cricket.

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    Thinking about it (now), the only time I use the phrase 'no problem' is after someone has thanked me for doing something...and generally it's only in a text message. Otherwise, I guess I'm still a dinosaur and still say Thank You and You're Welcome when writing other than text messages or verbally.

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    I also like "I was happy to do it," especially when your kind act could have been interpreted as obligatory. A version of "No problem" is a common European response: di niente, de nada, de rien, etc., but "it was nothing" is closer and sounds nicer to me. If you spend hours and hours making a quilt for someone, they thank you profusely and you say, "It was nothing" someone had better let them know it was indeed something so they don't treat it like an acrylic blanket from Walmart.

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    Never really thought about it. A "thanks" and "no problem" are better than nothing

  18. #18
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neesie View Post
    If it's a gift, or something I've done which required a bit of effort, I'll usually say, "You're very welcome." If I've done a favor for someone, I'll usually use the 'no problem' response. Why? Because I prefer to downplay the effort to myself, in that circumstance.

    I agree and have used the 'no problem' response.

  19. #19
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    How about "pardon me" and "excuse me"? I'm old school in many ways. Mom taught me manners and I've never lost sight of them. Thank you for posting bearisgray.

  20. #20
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    As long as the feeling is there, I don't get hung up on what words are used. Life is too short to get your knickers in a twist over little things.

    I must say, when I volunteer at the food shelf, and the clients thank me (and they always do) I make a point of saying, "You are very welcome." because I mean it and I want them to feel welcome.

  21. #21
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra in Minnesota View Post
    Thanks or Thank You is better than nothing!
    I don't really care, but I just like to have a gift acknowledged. There are more important things to focus on, IMO.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  22. #22
    Super Member Yooper32's Avatar
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    I don't text or have a smart phone, just a dumb phone and I prefer your example to the thank you and you are welcome, maybe even you are most welcome.
    Yooper32 aka: Donna B

  23. #23
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    My granddaughter who is 18 told me no problem when I told her thank you. I asked her oh so if it would have been a problem for you you wouldn't have helped me? She said I didn't mean that. I said then don't say no problem. Say you're welcome.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manalto View Post
    I also like "I was happy to do it," especially when your kind act could have been interpreted as obligatory. A version of "No problem" is a common European response: di niente, de nada, de rien, etc., but "it was nothing" is closer and sounds nicer to me. If you spend hours and hours making a quilt for someone, they thank you profusely and you say, "It was nothing" someone had better let them know it was indeed something so they don't treat it like an acrylic blanket from Walmart.
    I like the "I was happy to do it" response in place of "No problem" - IF I was happy (or at least not grumpy) to do it.

    I still balk at saying "I was happy to do it" when I was NOT happy to do it and did not want to; or "No problem" when doing whatever was a major effort or expensive or took a lot of time.

    I see no reason to downplay effort, time, or expense when someone not so dear has asked for a serious/major favor.

  25. #25
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    My granddaughter is not fond of the big family that is no longer on tv. but she saw one episode that really stuck with her. When some one says "Thank you', they now answer back "my pleasure'. She makes it a constant response and some of her friends respond "Happy to help or do it".

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