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Thread: How To Create Depth in This Half-Wonky Shoo Fly Quilt

  1. #11
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    Next we'll place in our low level blocks or missing color block. This low level was also used as a missing color because I saw the need for an orange in the quilt this far. And now we have a pic of the whole quilt!! There is also a pic of the actual color of the quilt so you can see how the low contrast block is really dark and not bright as in the earlier picture.

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  2. #12
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    This pic is of the actual color of the quilt that we mentioned earlier. Can you see how much darker the blue is in the low contrast block?
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  3. #13
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    ROTATION OF BLOCKS:

    After our colors are dispersed through the quilt adequately and we are pleased with the placement of the blocks, we want to focus on the SHAPE!!!

    One of the nice things about this wonky style is its different shapes and by rotating or turning the blocks in opposing ways helps to showcase their importance and drama!

    Yes, we want to focus on getting those shapes in one block opposite to those in the adjoining block! These odd shapes help to 'showcase' a certain color! You definitely want them in the right position!
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  4. #14
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    After the blocks are rotated, we can stand back and examine the quilt from a distance. Some of the shapes will jump out at you while others seem to retract. This is the time to get everything finalized in its right position before final sewing!

    Also, you might want to join all the blocks and rotate them in an area with very low lighting! The nice result of this is a quilt whose sections will really light up in the dark!! Well, if they don't light up literally, they will stand out much more by having done so!! The quilt's colors will have been 'well balanced' by having been done in low lighting!

    It's sometimes in low lighting that I realize the need for a move of a certain block while it's on the design wall.


  5. #15
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    TIPS:

    The first thing I'd like to show you is a sample of different wonky corners you can make. Be sure to use at least 3 different sizes of wonky corners for each block. If the onlooker sees a large sized wonky corner first, then the image is conveyed without further search. Here's a pic of a sample block for you.
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  6. #16
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    The next pic just shows how the direction of stripes were ignored when making the block. Since the theme is wonky, you might just do the same on any type of directional print also. These are prints like a chevron, a stripe, dots, plaids or anything showing a specific direction of the print.
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  7. #17
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    This pic shows how the placement of florals was avoided to just let them flutter to the ground and fall where they may in the block! haha.
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  8. #18
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    This pic shows the effectiveness of fabric repeats and can really give the quilt a 'connection' factor. We want all the blocks in the quilt to show a similar relationship to one another! However, I've been known to stick in a block that looks like none of the others. I do this in most of my quilts. It is my philosophy that there is always one in a crowd that does not belong. Among Jesus' disciples, there was one that did not belong. I did this in my last tut where I placed a really loud large scale plaid background fabric that had nothing to do whatsoever with all the small scale prints in the Square in a Square quilt. However, in the tut prior to that one, the Greek Key scrappy, I was not able to put in such a block.
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  9. #19
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    This last pic shows the quilt in another color scheme. It's in cool colors. It's just the opposite of my quilt so far as mine was primarily done using warm colors. This pic also shows the effective use of dark/light blocks showing good contrast and color placement of all the blocks. Take time to consider the use of colors in your quilt as well as fabric prints.
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  10. #20
    Super Member n2scraplvr's Avatar
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    CONCLUSION:

    In closing, I hope this tutorial has been a help to you! You can always refer to the pics of the sample blocks for color and placement ideas although any type of random placement is always more appealing than a set pattern. Take into consideration also the colors you are using in your quilt. I am more on the conservative side so my blocks may not be as expressive as yours depending on the fabrics you use and I've seen some of those great fabrics you have!

    Remember also that the block size is small (5") so even though you have some really great large scale prints you'd like to use in it, you should consider that fact. These small 2" squares can only handle so large of a scale of print. However, if you're making larger blocks, anything then would work well!

    I hope you are now better prepared and more knowledgeable for creating depth, contrast and movement so gather up those scraps and just have some fun putting together some unusual combinations! Opposites surely do attract! Happy quilting! n2

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