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Thread: Good for restore?

  1. #1
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    Good for restore?

    This would be my first restore? Do you think it's too challenging for a newbie?
    http://portland.craigslist.org/wsc/atq/4049120448.html

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Living4Him View Post
    This would be my first restore? Do you think it's too challenging for a newbie?
    http://portland.craigslist.org/wsc/atq/4049120448.html
    That depends on your abilities. I have an aunt who fixed her own TV but taking off the back panel and replacing bulbs. 0 training but she was able to.

    Restoring sewing machines isn't too hard. Take pictures from multiple angles so you can put it back together, and you should have no troubles.

  3. #3
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    I think it would be a great place to begin. The decals appear to be in good condition, and the refinishing on the cabinet has already been done for you. And, the price is right.
    jlm5419-an Okie in California
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
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    I can't beat the price for sure. I talked to the gal and she said her husband bought it in the early 70s for a project, he started on the cabinet, it got tucked away in a storage unit and now she just wants it to get some love. I told her it sounds like the perfect first try.
    I'm not too shabby in the mechanical department My mom tells everyone how she'd come home when I was a girl and I would have taken apart different electronics so I could try to put them back together! haha...last year I tore apart our washing machine and fixed the clutch, also tore apart our dryer and checked all the thermos, tried to fix our water heater to no avail and DID fix my hubby's little Toyota car twice! I think it'll be fun to fix this one up!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Living4Him View Post
    I can't beat the price for sure. I talked to the gal and she said her husband bought it in the early 70s for a project, he started on the cabinet, it got tucked away in a storage unit and now she just wants it to get some love. I told her it sounds like the perfect first try.
    I'm not too shabby in the mechanical department My mom tells everyone how she'd come home when I was a girl and I would have taken apart different electronics so I could try to put them back together! haha...last year I tore apart our washing machine and fixed the clutch, also tore apart our dryer and checked all the thermos, tried to fix our water heater to no avail and DID fix my hubby's little Toyota car twice! I think it'll be fun to fix this one up!
    Sounds like you're more than capable. Have fun

  6. #6
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    There's nothing there that "needs" restoring. Clean the top with sewing machine oil and cotton balls or soft flannel cloth, clean the underside as needed, then oil it properly. Clean the top tension, the bobbin area, adjust as needed.
    Put a new belt on it, a new needle in it, then thread it up and start sewing.

    ETA: I forgot to say; check the wiring for cracks, bare spots, and rodent chewed spots. It's not that hard to replace if needed.

    Joe
    Last edited by J Miller; 09-06-2013 at 10:45 AM. Reason: forgot something

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    There's nothing there that "needs" restoring. Clean the top with sewing machine oil and cotton balls or soft flannel cloth, clean the underside as needed, then oil it properly. Clean the top tension, the bobbin area, adjust as needed.
    Put a new belt on it, a new needle in it, then thread it up and start sewing.

    ETA: I forgot to say; check the wiring for cracks, bare spots, and rodent chewed spots. It's not that hard to replace if needed.

    Joe
    Thanks Joe. I will check all those areas. It looks like it needs a good cleaning but I haven't gotten into it much yet. It turns so that's a good thing! I hope the wiring is decent but if not, I'll come back for your advice.

  8. #8
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Living4Him,
    The craig's list ad is gone. Can you post a picture? I'd love to see what kind of machine you got.
    Thanks,
    Sharon

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplefiend View Post
    Living4Him,
    The craig's list ad is gone. Can you post a picture? I'd love to see what kind of machine you got.
    Thanks,
    Sharon
    Me too, so post a picture for this old lady who has the bug of the vintage, like me.

  10. #10
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I just got home - I missed the picture, too.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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