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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #37911
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    There is a Pfaff down in Bloomington Indiana... I wish I had the time...
    Miriam, don't you dare get another Pfaff, cause I'd just have to buy it from you!

    Charlee, I know you are like I am - not a lot of space for storage - but, I'd dicker and get that Pfaff! With no power cord or bobbin, you should get them to come down. Darren is right, Pfaff's can be turned around and sold real easily. I'd get the machine anyway, and watch E-bay for a power cord. It probably takes a normal Pfaff bobbin. I have 6 Pfaffs and between all of them there are only 2 style bobbins, but they all take a different power cord. You remember the Pfaff 260 I bought from Miriam didn't have a cord? I bought a generic power cord and foot pedal from Sew Classic for $20! If that machine were here, I'd get it - but, you all know I am partial to Pfaffs!

    Nancy

  2. #37912
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    Miriam, don't you dare get another Pfaff, cause I'd just have to buy it from you!

    Charlee, I know you are like I am - not a lot of space for storage - but, I'd dicker and get that Pfaff! With no power cord or bobbin, you should get them to come down. Darren is right, Pfaff's can be turned around and sold real easily. I'd get the machine anyway, and watch E-bay for a power cord. It probably takes a normal Pfaff bobbin. I have 6 Pfaffs and between all of them there are only 2 style bobbins, but they all take a different power cord. You remember the Pfaff 260 I bought from Miriam didn't have a cord? I bought a generic power cord and foot pedal from Sew Classic for $20! If that machine were here, I'd get it - but, you all know I am partial to Pfaffs!

    Nancy
    That's true, Nancy. Yours was rewired to fit an easy to find cord. Maybe the machine Charlie is looking at has also been similarly rewired by a U.S seller? The plug in the machine is very specific to Pfaff cords and very hard to get an inexpensive replacement. However, some smart people rewired some of the vintage Pfaffs to work off of cords that are easier to obtain. It sort of depends on how this machine is set up and wired...

    Miriam, Pfaffs have their own bobbin case like all European makers.

    I also agree with Nancy, that the Pfaff probably would have still come home with me for that price!
    Last edited by Candace; 09-13-2012 at 06:36 AM.

  3. #37913
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I should also add that I don't have the exact model you're looking at Charlie and maybe the cord would be cheaper than ones I've had to find for my other machines. I have 4 vintage Pfaffs and most of them have a foot control/cord combo. which is the one that's really expensive to replace. There are work arounds to everything, especially if you have someone on hand that's good with electrical components!

    Hey Nancy, I just got a call and will be picking up my Pfaff 362. I hope it's really and truly fixed!

  4. #37914
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post

    Hey Nancy, I just got a call and will be picking up my Pfaff 362. I hope it's really and truly fixed!
    Wow that is exciting. How long did he have the machine - 2 months? I can't wait to hear how it sews and what you think of the workmanship you paid for!

    Nancy

  5. #37915
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    It was longer than the 1 month they said, for sure! You're right, closer to two months. I'm just hoping I don't show up to a bill amount for over the estimate and that it does all the embroidery stitches. I won't be able to pick it up until the weekend. I suspect that this one gave him trouble. I know it did for me and that's why I handed it off to a professional! I don't like to do that, but this one was simply too much for me. Some vintage machines are just worth the $ if they're somewhat rare and in awesome condition, like this Pfaff 362 is.

    Oh and by the way, I'm absolutely loving the Pfaff 1471! Tell your friend she has a great machine. I've pieced and quilted several quilts on it and it's one I won't part with.

  6. #37916
    Senior Member grayhare's Avatar
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    Joe, I saw your tutorial on repairing your sewing machine case. I thought I would tackly mine. Could this case be stained? I still need to sand it, and remove the dried on glue. It had a red/brown type leather/vinyl on part of it and you can see where it stained the wood. Any suggestions?
    Hope the pictures come through the right size, Thank you, Anamaria
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  7. #37917
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    grayhare,

    Is that case from a Kenmore, or a White? The hinges look like those types.

    I would say it was originally covered but most likely not with the vinyl or leatherette. Most were covered with cloth, paper, or the straw cloth like the Singers.

    You could sand it, fill in all the divots and blemishes then stain and finish it. It would probably look pretty decent since it's made from real wood rather than plywood or masonite.

    Joe

  8. #37918
    Senior Member grayhare's Avatar
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    Hi Joe, It is actually from my Singer Spartan sewing machine.
    It was covered with grasscloth, and a red/brown type of cloth, I thought maybe vinyl or leather. I didn't know if it would look nice stained, wasn't sure how the stain would look. And since I have never down staining before? I was thinking of using a technique I have seen on various blogs using brown craft paper.
    http://lovelycraftyhome.com/2011/11/...looring-guide/
    Thought it might look nice. I would paint the top edge, maybe black. I will have to think about it.
    Anamaria




    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    grayhare,

    Is that case from a Kenmore, or a White? The hinges look like those types.

    I would say it was originally covered but most likely not with the vinyl or leatherette. Most were covered with cloth, paper, or the straw cloth like the Singers.

    You could sand it, fill in all the divots and blemishes then stain and finish it. It would probably look pretty decent since it's made from real wood rather than plywood or masonite.

    Joe

  9. #37919
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I have a question for those of you with vintage machines from European manufacturers. I was interested in a machine via CL until I found out it was using a converter. I did some reading on them and I'm still uneasy about buying a machine that needs a converter to work here on our power. I passed on the machine as I would rather wait for one that was sold to the U.S. market and 110volts. Do any of you have machines that use converters and have there been any problems using one?

  10. #37920
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I have a question for those of you with vintage machines from European manufacturers. I was interested in a machine via CL until I found out it was using a converter. I did some reading on them and I'm still uneasy about buying a machine that needs a converter to work here on our power. I passed on the machine as I would rather wait for one that was sold to the U.S. market and 110volts. Do any of you have machines that use converters and have there been any problems using one?
    When stationed in Germany for six years we use converters to step down the 220v to 110v so we could use our American appliances including sewing machine. Never had a bit of problem. We also brought some 220v items back with us that use a converter to step 110v to 220v and never add a problem with them either. The diff is in Europe the voltage is 50 cycles instead of 60 like in the US. I would not hesitate to use a machine with a converter.

    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

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