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Thread: Blind Hemmer???? Anyone have one?

  1. #1
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    Blind Hemmer???? Anyone have one?

    I seem to be asked to hem up pants for our gentlemen in the congregation as their wives do not sew. I usually do it by hand but wonder about the blind hemmer. Does anyone have one and if so how easy is it to work. Any websites/videos I can check out to see how to work one? Is it worth my time and money?

    Just what I need another machine.

    Thanks all.
    Suz in Iowa
    Designer EPIC, Brother XR3140
    Babylock Evolve, Innova 26" LS, MQR
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  2. #2
    Power Poster
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    Just Google it for your machine(s).

  3. #3
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
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    The attachment foot comes with most machines, or can buy separate. They are so easy to use, takes a couple minutes to set up hem, but then so fast. That is the only way I hem, all fabrics.

  4. #4
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have one with a 1962 Singer. Never used it. Now I only use two straight stitch machines now. All I sew now are quilts.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  5. #5
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I have one on my 401A and my newer Brother they both do a wonderful job. All of us in my family are short and I have to take up the hem on everything we buy so mine really get used a lot. The instructions came with the manual with my machines and is very easy to learn.

  6. #6
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    If you are referring to the foot that attaches to your machine...I do not like using that. If you mean the blind hem machine...yes, I had one when I did alterations for 15 yrs. it gives very professional results. You know the needle is horiz instead of vertical like your machine? It takes just a bit of practice to master it. You'd want one that uses standard machine needles as they are more economical to replace. Personally, I liked hand hemming as well cause I could work at night & watch tv. The hammers are not cheap, but I got mine from Allbrandsat a good price.

  7. #7
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Sorry for the spelling of hemmer..auto correct is villain!

  8. #8
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    it is the stitch that goes for about 4 stitch forward and then does a V stitch. Probably will take you longer to select the width and length of your DSM stitches then just to hem them.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  9. #9
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    You probably have that stitch built-in in one or more of the machines you already have. Check the manuals, and as maniac quilter said, it is a straight stitch for about four stitches, then a zigzag, then straight stitches. The sewing machine manual will even show how to fold your fabric for the stitching. The key is to set it so the bite (zigzag) does not go too far into the folded edge of fabric.

  10. #10
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    Guess most are confused as to which type of blind hemmer I'm speaking about. Its the machine, not the attachment. Mermaid explained some of it to me so will go out and see what I can find on the web. Maybe get lucky enough to find a video on it.

    Thanks all.
    Suz in Iowa
    Designer EPIC, Brother XR3140
    Babylock Evolve, Innova 26" LS, MQR
    ProQ Designer, EQ7, Embird

  11. #11
    Junior Member IraJane's Avatar
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    Use it any time I'm hemming with my Bernina. Makes a good narrow topstitch guide, too. Perfect for topstitching pockets on, edges, etc...

  12. #12
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    A blind hemmed foot came with my machine. With a little practice it is easy to use.

  13. #13
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    If you're talking about the foot that comes with most machines, I love mine and I use them all of the time. Just like anything else, you need to practise a bit but not hard at all. I've seen the machines and they scare me, because the needle goes sideways. I've known people who have used them and they never had any problems.

  14. #14
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    Mine just has a setting on my machine, had to read the direction. Don't use it enough to remember how, have to start from scratch each time, but once you get the hang of it (it has more to do with folding the fabric, them the foot) it is pretty easy. If you still have it, gran your instruction book that came with your machine.
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  15. #15
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    The blind hemmer machine makes the stitch you see on retail hems--you know when you pull one thread just right, it totally unravels the entire hem? It sews horizontally instead of vertically like your sewing machine, and only uses a top thread---there is no bobbin. The cover stitch on the inside looks luke a serging stitch, but outside are only tiny pin dots of thread. It does a professional job. Totally different from the blind stitch on a sewing machine. You can view a demonstration at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGuBwBGU9lE
    Last edited by mermaid; 03-28-2015 at 12:03 PM.

  16. #16
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    I use the stitch on my machine that sews 5 straight stitches, then one off to the side zigzag. It does a great job, thought because it's not a true blindstitch, I need to put the bulk of the garment under the arm, but that no big deal with most apparel. You fold the hem in such a way that the 5 stitches are in the hem and the needle picks 2 threads in the pant fabric as it swings over. Do you have a machine with any built in stitches or cams? This one is pretty common.

  17. #17
    Senior Member maryb44662's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clem55 View Post
    The attachment foot comes with most machines, or can buy separate. They are so easy to use, takes a couple minutes to set up hem, but then so fast. That is the only way I hem, all fabrics.
    ME too....lol I use to do the hemming by hand, not anymore.
    MaryB

  18. #18
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    There is a blind hem stitch built into my machine and I use it quite often. It's easy and quick to use. Once the hem is pressed, it looks great.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    You probably have that stitch built-in in one or more of the machines you already have. Check the manuals, and as maniac quilter said, it is a straight stitch for about four stitches, then a zigzag, then straight stitches. The sewing machine manual will even show how to fold your fabric for the stitching. The key is to set it so the bite (zigzag) does not go too far into the folded edge of fabric.

    This is my comment too. Unless you are planning to become a professional tailor or home decorator, one of the sewing machines you list as owning should have a hem stitch built into it. Blind hem machines cost a few hundred dollars and do the chain-type stitch as mentioned....and one less " machine" to make room for. Jmho
    Last edited by Geri B; 03-31-2015 at 04:08 AM.

  20. #20
    Super Member oldtnquiltinglady's Avatar
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    Suz in Iowa; it looks to me like every machine you own has a built-in hem stitch. Go to your local quilting guild, or LQS (if you will) and ask someone there to demonstrate hemming for you. Take an old pair of pants, or skirt, with you to be used for the demonstration. The tactic is a little difficult to understand, but once you work it out in your mind, you are good to go. Amazing. You hem a skirt in less than 5 minutes without much worry changing thread colors, etc. than you would, sitting in front of the TV for a whole show before you have a garment hemmed.
    Make every day count for something!

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  21. #21
    Senior Member Phyllis nm's Avatar
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    i have had 2 f these machines for years. i love both, they are commerical machines. i use the clear thread and never change thread. go to a local shop that carries them and play with one,

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