Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Clothing Measurements

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,292

    Clothing Measurements

    I just finished arguing with my daughter about how to measure yourself or someone else for making clothing. I'm not sure if all the points I made were clear enough for her to understand that just because her daughter wears her pants lower on the hip doesn't mean you buy patterns using the hip measurement as the waistline. So I decided to draw up a measurement guide for her so we can get this straight and maybe I can make her daughter something that fits her properly.

    So I decided to share this guide in case others are having similar problems explaining it to the younger generation.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    36,496
    Only a non sewer could think that don't need accurate measurements. I don't make fitted clothes but stick to elastic waistbands.

  3. #3
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    19,229
    Blog Entries
    2
    Boy , I remember that.

  4. #4
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    7,021
    Blog Entries
    1
    Lately, any patterns I buy seem to have nothing to do with the measurements listed on them. I don't know if something has changed in modern patterns or what the deal is, but it is a pain. I hope your chart helps with your project.

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    49,475
    Blog Entries
    53
    when i was a machine knitter, we had to take all these measurements to knit pants!... yes we even knitted pants. it's like quilters making everything quilty. LOL
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  6. #6
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,842
    Yesterday I decided to try and make myself a dress. I normally wear a 4 petite in ready to wear. My hip measurement translates to a size 16 in the pattern! Accurate measurements are so important. Your chart is good. I would change the word "crouch" to "crotch" though.
    Alyce

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    7,225
    Blog Entries
    1
    Sometimes the confusion isn't in the fit or terminology, it's in the location. I used to work out at a gym that helped people keep goals by tracking their weight, measurements, workout levels, etc. When I went for a weigh & measure, what I considered my waist and what they considered my waist were two totally different areas on my body. I had the same problem with my mother-in-law - she asked me to adjust a skirt waistband, so I measured her and adjusted it. Problem was, she wanted to wear that skirt a lot higher than I had adjusted it for, so it didn't fit the way she wanted it to.

    I have a hard time finding jeans that fit correctly - the waist is always far too high on me and I end up with a baggy crotch, even though I am long-waisted. I usually end up wearing a belt and rolling the waist up over it. Makes me wonder how those pants fit the poor creatures with short waists.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,292
    Glad you caught that Thanks I will and yes I remember when I did make fitted clothes for people long time ago the hardest part was explaining to them why I needed to buy a pattern larger then what size clothes they were buying in the stores. They have always been different as far as I know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
    Yesterday I decided to try and make myself a dress. I normally wear a 4 petite in ready to wear. My hip measurement translates to a size 16 in the pattern! Accurate measurements are so important. Your chart is good. I would change the word "crouch" to "crotch" though.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,292
    Peckish, the reason I put "Natural Waist" is this gives you an idea where to measure. The natural waist is the smallest area between your breast and your hips. If you use this as a starting point and then adjust your pattern from there, chances are you will get a good fit.

    I am very short waisted and yes I agree that it's almost impossible for me to buy a pair of pants that fit. Most pants that fit my butt usually come up over my ribs. SO I quit buying clothes and make my own. Even shirts are a pain since they hang to long, not what a short person needs. It use to be funny when I was tiny because I could buy a shirt one size larger and then slap on a belt and have me a dress.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    4,294
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I have a hard time finding jeans that fit correctly - the waist is always far too high on me and I end up with a baggy crotch, even though I am long-waisted. I usually end up wearing a belt and rolling the waist up over it. Makes me wonder how those pants fit the poor creatures with short waists.
    I am the one of those short-waisted people! I was thrilled when low-rise jeans became popular because they fit me like normal jeans fit on regular people. They're getting harder to find; when I find jeans or work pants that fit well I will buy 5 pair!!

    Plus I'm plenty overweight so I really don't need this big roll of belt and denim making me look even MORE lumpy than I already am!

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    2,073
    Blog Entries
    14
    Also have you noticed that if you buy the next larger size blouse/shirt with long sleeves from what you have been wearing (went from xl to 1x), the length of the sleeve has really increased. I have to roll up the sleeves 2 or 3 times or I've got the cuff at my finger tips.

  12. #12
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Arkansas
    Posts
    2,483
    Blog Entries
    3
    It seems to me that ready made blouses in large sizes means you should have gorilla length arms. Don't they know our arms don't grow longer just because our behind is larger?
    TwandasMom

  13. #13
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,653
    Thank for the chart. I've been looking all over for mine since I started a new shirt yesterday.

    I bought a size medium pattern but according to their measurements I needed a large so I traced a new pattern 1/4" bigger on all TEN pieces! So far it's working.

    Now I wish I could find the envelope (the pattern). I shopped for it a long time ago and got started and realize now I forgot the interfacing pattern. Oops.

    I have noticed the very long arms on larger sizes. I want to learn to sew because I'm tired of see-through clothing with cap sleeves, and low-rise pants, etc.
    :-)
    CAS

  14. #14
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    7,663
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by misseva View Post
    It seems to me that ready made blouses in large sizes means you should have gorilla length arms. Don't they know our arms don't grow longer just because our behind is larger?
    The thing I hate is that they think all fat people are short! All of the shirts I could buy, are way too short. Anything labeled as a tunic length is going to shop at my hip if I am lucky. I am only 5'6" but our family has very short legs and long bodies, so nothing ever fits me (with the exception of Lee jeans, for some reason they fit perfect) sewing for myself is just as frustrating. I need four patterns, or a four size pattern, just to make a pair of pants fit. When my DD was small, I made her one piece, zipper front, jump suits to play in, and had to take six inches off at the hem, and add the same amount to the waist! My biggest pet peeve is large size tank tops are always cut so most of my bra shows under my arms, and I have to either alter them, or wear a shirt over them which defeats the point of wearing a tank top!
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  15. #15
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,145
    As far as waistlines - is the person's waistline parallel with the floor?

    Mine isn't - and it is not a commonly shown alteration - it is about three inches lower in front than in the back - so a skirt clinging to the narrow part of my midsection will really droop in front.

    Pants are usually really short in the center back and come up almost to my breasts in front. (I did try turning them backwards - but that didn't take care of the problem, either. )

  16. #16
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,145
    Most non-sewers do not realize that pattern sizes, especially for women, do not correlate to ready-to-wear sizing.

    Also, most adult female patterns are designed for a b-cup bra sized figure.

  17. #17
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    7,225
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by seasaw2mch View Post
    Peckish, the reason I put "Natural Waist" is this gives you an idea where to measure. The natural waist is the smallest area between your breast and your hips.
    That's interesting, because when I was getting weighed and measured, they would have me bend sideways, and where I bent was what they called my natural waist. And let me tell you, if my pants went up that high, I would go nuts. I can't stand pants that cover my belly button.

    Sometimes I really envy men. Why is it that all they need is waist and length, and pants fit them just fine, no matter their shape???

  18. #18
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Arkansas
    Posts
    2,483
    Blog Entries
    3
    When my daughter was small she had no hips. If I bought her a 'slim' size pant they came up to her ankles. I started buying her jeans from Sears in the boys department. You could get slim - and order by waist size where girls were more like small-med-large.
    TwandasMom

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.