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Thread: Ever plant a perennial and then regret it?

  1. #1
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    Did you ever plant a perennial and then wish you hadn't?

    If so, what did you plant, and why did you regret it?

    I'll go first... saponaria oficinalis "bouncing bet". I saw it growing along a roadside near the Finger Lakes area of NY... and dug up a bit for my garden. It grows well, but too well; it takes over, and can creep underground for several feet. I should move it all to the "wild fringes of the yard".

  2. #2
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    yes, about 15 years ago, I put flower beds all around the house and along the driveway

    as we are getting older, I can't take care of it, so hubby last fall, tore the ones out along the back of the house, used old push mower to cut to ground level after pulling out some of the old stuff, he sprayed with weed killer for about 2 months, and then he used hoe to loosen the soil and planted grass seed last fall and put straw over it for the winter, this spring he racked off straw and now we have grass

    along the back of kitchen window, I had the peppermint herb and was wild and a big mess, now it is just grass and easier to take care of

    Good luck!

  3. #3
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    A trumpet vine. Darn thing just keeps coming back and back and back.

  4. #4
    Super Member mamaw's Avatar
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    Ohhh yes!!! I planted lady's mantle and it was so happy here, it was just growing everywhere and I couldn't get a grip on it. Ended up selling all the plants to local nurseries, so it was a profitable problem lol.

  5. #5
    Junior Member Auntie M's Avatar
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    I didn't plant it, previous owners did...but I fight it every day. vinca vine. I shudder as I type it.

  6. #6
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I made the big mistake about 15 years ago and I'm still fighting them...Morning Glory Vines...They are beautiful, but they choke out anything they can wrap around...

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Yes, I've planted several things, English Ivy, Vinca vine, wild violets, and some I didn't even know the name of. We have a honeysuckle vine growing on a fence, know we will regret that, if we live long enough, if not it will be someone elses' problem. Right now the Hummingbirds, butterflies and bees are wild about it.

  8. #8
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    We also have a honeysuckle plant on the north side of our house and it is as big as a car now! Lots of rabbits live in it and everytime I go outside, birds fly out of it. DH just mows around it. We also have a pampas grass that blocks the view from my kitchen window - it is very big.

  9. #9
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    Black Eyed Susan - my DH wanted something pretty for a fancy iron trellis he bought and thought it would be nice to be able to see it from the dining room window so he positioned the trellis between two huge oleander bushes and the rest was history! We had to hire someone to clear it out and to this day it pops up still in our yard, the neighbor's yard, the school field next door, etc.................

  10. #10
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    I bought my own mothers day hydrangia it was called lady in red. I was some new hybred. I love how they have such bushy heads. But do you think mine would bloom properly.NO! It is horrible I have cut it to the root and it grows back no matter what I do it does not bloom like it should!

  11. #11
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Not really a perennial and I didn't plant it...but two plant species in our garden drive me nuts. The previous owners must have thought Kikuyu Grass would be a good idea (NOT!) it has spread everywhere and sends its huge deep runners into all the garden beds and has even "escaped" onto the verge near the road...they also planted s variety of Tecoma...it suckers everywhere and is a monster to control. My plan is to eradicate the lot, but I don't use chemicals or poisons on our land...so I'm guessing I'll be at it for a while.

  12. #12
    Senior Member sewjean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilpoohbearie
    I bought my own mothers day hydrangia it was called lady in red. I was some new hybred. I love how they have such bushy heads. But do you think mine would bloom properly.NO! It is horrible I have cut it to the root and it grows back no matter what I do it does not bloom like it should!
    I think they need certain kind of soil to bloom in blue or pink. Might have to add something to the soil. Unless I am thinking of something else........

  13. #13
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    LILLIES! of every color imaginable were planted here when we moved in, I am in the process of removing them and taking them to my husbands grandmothers house. I have heard that it is a NIGHTMARE to get rid of these things.

  14. #14
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    Oh yes. Many years ago we bought this really cool plant for our desert rock garden. this year it was at an all time glory. Turned out to be a ground cover that started taking over our yard. One day DH decided to thin it out and became very ill. His eyes were burning so badly and they almost were swollen shut. And anywhere on his body where he had touched himself even after a shower (and yes...even there!!) started burning and stinging. This lasted for about 4 days.

    One day at work he noticed this flyer posted on the wall about this noxious weed that was invading Utah and lo and behold there was a photo of our wonderful ground cover!! Turns out it is very dangerous and against the law to now have in your yard. It causes blisters, burning and can even cause blindness!

    Well, it took several days to purge our yard of this and my DH and SIL had to wear all kinds of protective gear to get rid of this stuff. This stuff is so good at reproducing itself that we will be battling it for a long time as it has dropped seeds everywhere :(

    I'm including a photo in case some of you unknowingly have some in your yard. It does well in many of the western states.

    It is called Myrtle spurge and sometimes gopher spurge because it repels gophers. I wondered where all our gophers went! I thought our sonic things had finally started working :lol: :lol:
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilpoohbearie
    I bought my own mothers day hydrangia it was called lady in red. I was some new hybred. I love how they have such bushy heads. But do you think mine would bloom properly.NO! It is horrible I have cut it to the root and it grows back no matter what I do it does not bloom like it should!
    I have a hydrangea and it was gorgeous this year. The blooms were pinkish lavender and it was loaded with flowers. Hydrangeas are a shade plant and if you're pruning it back any time after July you may be cutting off next year's flowers. I read that somewhere so started pruning as soon as the flowers were past peak. Seems to have worked great!
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  16. #16
    Super Member C.Cal Quilt Girl's Avatar
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    Although not a perennial, have an agave plant the neighbors gave us, now it looks like there are 30, told can cook w/the leaves 3ft + spikey, wouldn't mind trying, but have no clue what to do with it. Needs moved to back of property, bet no one would jump over :) HeHe
    Do have somthing called apple, sure is hearty !!

  17. #17
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    See this is what a hydragia is supposed to look like mine I think they mixed it with some other plant and sold it as a hydrangia mine gets flowers in a ring not in the bushy heads like yours. They are so beautiful when the are true hydrangia plants! I will try to post a pic tomorrow.

  18. #18
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    snow on the mountain took over the whole flower bed pull it out every spring. Previous owner morning glory vine good grief after 20 yrs still fighting it chokes the life out of everything even my tall grass

  19. #19
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    Japanese lanterns....the owners before us planted it. We've pulled it out several times, as have our neighbors next door on both sides of us....very annoying.

  20. #20
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    Lamb's Ears.............I used to LOVE them - 'have given plants to so many people, dug all that I had left out, but noooooooooo - came back with a vengence............I give up

  21. #21
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    If I have a perennial that's *overtaking*, I'm vicious about pulling the starters out in the spring when the plant is young or about now when they've spent their bloom from summer.

    Black-eyed Susans, Lambs Ear, and Japanees Lanterns are spread by seed so even if you pull up ALL the plants more will grow back next year...hence the reason for pulling up young ones in the spring to keep control.

    I just tore out a HUGE clump of Lamb's Ear because it looked old. I'm sure new LE will be around somewhere next year.

    Lily of the Valley are next in line for major pulling.

    It's the NEW Poison Ivy that has me baffled and *on guard*. NEVER had to deal with it before anywhere...didn't really know for sure if it was PI.
    A friend and a rash confirmed it.

    Remember: Perinneals SLEEP the first year, CREEP the second year and LEAP the third year after planting.

  22. #22
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    A friend brought me some ivy to plant. it took a few years to get going but now has taken over. I spend a lot of time trying to get rid of it now.

  23. #23
    Super Member kristen0112's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tink's Mom
    I made the big mistake about 15 years ago and I'm still fighting them...Morning Glory Vines...They are beautiful, but they choke out anything they can wrap around...
    Morning Glory in our neck of the woods is considered a weed LOL.

    Growing up my dad owned a nursery - I haven't planted anything that I didn't love but it's probably because of my background.

  24. #24
    Senior Member quilter on the eastern edge's Avatar
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    I have bishop's weed, brought to my garden unintentially in a hosta transplant from my FIL's garden. There must have been a tiny piece of bishop's weed root mixed in with the hosta root - that's all it takes! It has been a major problem in my garden since. I have to be digging it up constantly or it will take over. I have it contained in one area now and can't seem to get rid of it completely.

  25. #25
    Super Member CraftsByRobin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earthwalker
    Not really a perennial and I didn't plant it...but two plant species in our garden drive me nuts. The previous owners must have thought Kikuyu Grass would be a good idea (NOT!) it has spread everywhere and sends its huge deep runners into all the garden beds and has even "escaped" onto the verge near the road...they also planted s variety of Tecoma...it suckers everywhere and is a monster to control. My plan is to eradicate the lot, but I don't use chemicals or poisons on our land...so I'm guessing I'll be at it for a while.
    I had never heard of Kikuyu Grass ... so I lookedit up ... and found this: It is on both the California and the Federal noxious-weed lists. In other words, it is illegal to plant kikuyugrass deliberately.

    It's also very hard to get rid of ... I found my information at this website:

    http://grounds-mag.com/mag/grounds_m...h_kikuyugrass/

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