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Thread: Grrr....my naughty dog!

  1. #1
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    My dog has just developed a very annoying habit of using my pergola area as a toilet! It is extremely offensive to me, as he will even do his business right outside the back door. He has full access to the backyard, as there is no fencing around the concreted area, so I know its not because he cant get out there.

    Ive tried growling at him, scolding him, showing it to him and growling, but he still doesnt get it. (This is why he is an outside dog anyway, as he refused to learn how to be toilet trained inside the house) Does anyone have an ideas on how I can stop this terrible behaviour?
    He is a Staffordshire Terrier by the way

  2. #2
    Super Member Leota's Avatar
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    1st... is this a new behavior? Take him to the vet to make sure everything is ok... then...
    this is what I did
    I broke my dog of inappropriate toilet use with a wooden paddle.. I spanked him till his little fanny glowed red...all the while holding his nose in his mess... he Never went in the house again...ever... he lived to be 17 years old.

  3. #3
    Super Member Murphy's Avatar
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    He loves you and wants to be near you and is lonely. Walk out in the yard with him on frequent occasions and he will go far away where you walk.

  4. #4
    Junior Member arbed31's Avatar
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    A squirt from the water hose just as he is starting to do his business might help.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Some animals will do this to get attention just like children do :roll: Is it cooler up by the house? Are there other shady areas he can go to in the yard? :D:D:D

  6. #6
    pookie ookie's Avatar
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    Every outdoor dog I've known has done it. I don't know the dog logic behind it. Have you tried finding him another home? Or, you could build a large kennel for the times when he is unattended.

    The only thing I've ever seen work is *daily* walks. Either one long one or one morning and one evening.

  7. #7
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arbed31
    A squirt from the water hose just as he is starting to do his business might help.
    My husband used to lob apples or lemons at our dog whenever he caught her going where she shouldn't. lol, it worked, and she doesn't poop around the apple or lemon trees either.

  8. #8
    Super Member Tussymussy's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Having been a Staffie owner, I guess that he is not treating you as the alpha dog of his pack and is therefore ignoring you. the male Staffie can be very dominant.

    Without knowing more about his behaviour it is difficult to make suggestions, but it does sound as if he needs training classes and/or a dog behavourist.

  9. #9
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the suggestions.....

    He does go for a daily walk.
    He has plenty of trees for shade, and if anything, its warmer under ther pergola as it doesnt get the breeze.
    He has a large kennel, and lots of blankets, and bones and toys you name it hes got it.
    He doesnt do it when I am around, nor when I am awake, its like he knows he shouldnt be doing it, but still does.
    I dont thing its a medical problem, as he does the number ones and twos there.
    He gets plenty of attention when i come home from work, we play fetch, go for our walk, he gets brushed, and I am in and out all even ing beforeI go to bed, and he gets a bedtime biscuit.
    The paddle might work, or a rolled up newspaper, because its like he knows he should not be doing it, but still does, just like when he decides to have a barking fit in the middle of the night. He sees me open the curtain, and he scuttles straight into his kennel, not to be heard from again.
    Any other ideas?

  10. #10
    Cyn
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    Super Member Cyn's Avatar
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    I feel for you! I rescued a beagle puppy that had never been out of a gage :( We spent 8 months trying everything we could think of to housebreak her. Puppy papers. Walks. Sprays. We have a Jack Russell that never has accidents and we have a doggie door to the outside open all the time!!!! She was going to have to go to another home and as a last ditch effort I sent her to boarding school for a month. She lived in their house with 5 of the biggest labs I have ever seen .They won all kinds of ribbons and awards! I was so nervous she would fall back into bad habits since the trainer said she was most difficult to train. She came back and has never had another accident for 2 years! She also got manners and learned to walk on a leash along with tricks and obedience commands. It was expensive but worht every penny to be able to keep her.

  11. #11
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tussymussy
    Hi,

    Having been a Staffie owner, I guess that he is not treating you as the alpha dog of his pack and is therefore ignoring you. the male Staffie can be very dominant.

    Without knowing more about his behaviour it is difficult to make suggestions, but it does sound as if he needs training classes and/or a dog behavourist.
    Hes not a dominant dog, he is actually very submissive. This has only started happening in the past 3 weeks, and has progressivly gotten worse. Normally hes a good boy! But gee, so stubborn :lol:

    I may not have any other choice than a behaviourist if he keeps it up....or a new home!

    Oh by the way, he is 5 years old

  12. #12
    pookie ookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tweetee
    Quote Originally Posted by Tussymussy
    Hi,

    Having been a Staffie owner, I guess that he is not treating you as the alpha dog of his pack and is therefore ignoring you. the male Staffie can be very dominant.

    Without knowing more about his behaviour it is difficult to make suggestions, but it does sound as if he needs training classes and/or a dog behavourist.
    Hes not a dominant dog, he is actually very submissive. This has only started happening in the past 3 weeks, and has progressivly gotten worse. Normally hes a good boy! But gee, so stubborn :lol:

    I may not have any other choice than a behaviourist if he keeps it up....or a new home!

    Oh by the way, he is 5 years old
    Go for a vet visit while you're at it. New behavior may be a health issue.

    When you walk him, do you exhaust him or is it a stroll?

  13. #13
    Super Member quiltlonger's Avatar
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    Is there another dog or cat in the area that may be marking that territory when you aren't around and your dog (bless his soul) may be trying to tell you and neighbors animals SHE's mine. There are sprays to break animals from going where not wanted. Can you wrap one of his doggie blankets around area so he's not gonna want pee on his stuff??

  14. #14
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pookie ookie
    Quote Originally Posted by tweetee
    Quote Originally Posted by Tussymussy
    Hi,

    Having been a Staffie owner, I guess that he is not treating you as the alpha dog of his pack and is therefore ignoring you. the male Staffie can be very dominant.

    Without knowing more about his behaviour it is difficult to make suggestions, but it does sound as if he needs training classes and/or a dog behavourist.
    Hes not a dominant dog, he is actually very submissive. This has only started happening in the past 3 weeks, and has progressivly gotten worse. Normally hes a good boy! But gee, so stubborn :lol:

    I may not have any other choice than a behaviourist if he keeps it up....or a new home!

    Oh by the way, he is 5 years old
    Go for a vet visit while you're at it. New behavior may be a health issue.

    When you walk him, do you exhaust him or is it a stroll?
    no, dont exhaust him, we do some brisk walking, where he trots along, then about 10 minutes from home its a stroll, so he gets his breath back.

  15. #15
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltlonger
    Is there another dog or cat in the area that may be marking that territory when you aren't around and your dog (bless his soul) may be trying to tell you and neighbors animals SHE's mine. There are sprays to break animals from going where not wanted. Can you wrap one of his doggie blankets around area so he's not gonna want pee on his stuff??
    You might be onto something there...We have had a new dog move into the area, although has never been in my yard. They blanket idea is a good one, might also have a look for the spray you mentioned too.
    Thanks very much

  16. #16
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
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    I agree with the vet. I have heard that dogs have short term memory so once their business is done rubbing their nose and using spoon is not going to do much but hurt the poor puppy. I am not sure but has your area received a lot of rain? Maybe the ground is different for his feet?

  17. #17
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    we have had alot of rain and there is alot more grass that what there was, but he doesnt appear to have an avesion to the grass, as he still runs all over the backyard when we play fetch and tug of war etc.

    But, a couple of weeks ago, we did have rain for a week solid, and the ground was VERY wet, and he did do a couple under the pergola then, but over near the very edge. Perhaps its developed into a habit from that. But how to stop it. perhaps seeking advice from the vet is the best way to go..and the spray too, as I dont like to spank him.
    Thankyou all for your suggestions, you have been very helpful

  18. #18
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    I don't know how to tell you to break him of this but I do know you need to remove the scent from the area he's using. as long as he can find a scent-his or another dog he will keep going there. I've heard Nature's Remedy works well.

  19. #19
    Super Member KathyAire's Avatar
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    I don't know how to training an outside dog. Most dogs have to be caught in the act. I do know one thing, I would never spank a dog, I don't care what he did. If something was so bad that I had to spank him, I would rehome him. There are families that are willing to training a dog properly but spanking is not it.

    You could probably take him, on leash, to the area you want him to go in. That takes a lot of attention and you have to know his routine.

  20. #20
    Member Bren49's Avatar
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    I would fill milk gallon jugs with water and put them where you don't want him to go.
    That has worked for me.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arbed31
    A squirt from the water hose just as he is starting to do his business might help.
    My Chesepeake would have loved you spraying water at her. She would just have thought you were going to play, so I guess it depends on the dog.

  22. #22
    Super Member gzuslivz's Avatar
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    A squirt bottle with vinegar water works. They HATE the vinegar and it is harmless. Also, throw something noisy near him when he starts. They don't like that, either. But, if he doesn't do it when you are around these hints won't really help. I would suggest get rid of the scent and put down a blanket. And I would check with the vet. Good luck!

  23. #23
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Sounds like you need Cesar Millian.

  24. #24
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tweetee
    He doesnt do it when I am around, nor when I am awake, its like he knows he shouldnt be doing it, but still does.
    This is the key. There are two types of training. Training a dog TO DO something (sit, stay etc), and training a dog NOT TO DO something (eat garbage, pee in the house). You can no more expect to train a dog to sit if your not present than you can train a dog NOT to something if your not present. Dogs are not capable of abstract thinking, they live 'in the moment'. Say sit, he sits, he gets a treat and he understands it was for sitting when you said sit. Say sit, the dog wanders off somewhere then sits - if you gave him a treat at this point he'd think "cool - I get a treat for wandering off". Get it?

    I've trained ummm ... well lots of dogs to housebreak and a few for competition obedience.

    The key is that you have to watch them, constantly. You can't let them out of your sight. Seriously.

    With puppies it's actually easier because it's not a "behaviorial" issue (as I think might be the case with your Staffie). It's not like they sneaked off, or waited until you were in the other room - if a puppy has to go he'll sit in front of you and go. Puppies poop and pee at pretty predictable times (after eating, after waking, and after playing) so it's easy to scoop them up and take them out for potty at these times. With an older dog, their schedules are not so predictable anymore - but those same moments could still be key.

    When your dog is in the house, give him two options. He is either within your sight at all times (I've even attached foster adults to my ankle with a long line so I know when they've moved), or confined to a crate where he most likely will not soil (providing the crate is the correct size). When he's in your site you have to be vigilant in watching him. You need to know the "signs" of when he's about to eliminate and once you've learned these signs you need to catch him when he's thinking about doing it, but hasn't yet committed the act (go back to the first pararagraph of "thinking in the moment"). Barring the second before the offensive act, you must at least catch him IN the act. Any later than that and the moment is lost.

    Lastly, once you've mastered the timing of catching him, the punishment needs to be swift and memorable (to the dog). I DON'T condone hitting, kicking or swatting with other objects. I will however throw an object (keys are great) in the DIRECTION of the dog to get their attention and at the same time yell "NO" or whatever you use. You need to make this NO sound as if Satan himself has emoted from your own bowels through your voice - make the windows rattle. If your dog RUNS - you've done it right. Yeah ... scare the *bleep* out of him. And once you've picked a word (no, stop, leave it), stick with THAT WORD.

    Voice inflection is your most important tool in training dogs. If you use your happy voice and tell the dog he's a bad boy, he'll wiggle. If you use your angry voice and tell him he's a bad boy, he'll sulk. Learn to use the full volume and spectrum of your voice, when you want your dog TO do something speak with authority - good volume and steady tone. When you want your dog to STOP doing something make it sound angry. With my very young puppies (2 weeks and up). I will actually growl at them because that is a sound they associate with their mother telling them something is wrong so STOP (even before they could open their eyes).

    I will often 'set my dogs up' to teach them NOT to do something, especially my puppies. I'll leave the garbage can open in the middle of the kitchen and hide around the corner with my set of keys and wait for the puppy to walk toward the can looking at and sniffing - when he's about 1' away - I sling the keys at the can and yell "LEAVE IT" at the same time. Puppy now thinks the garbage can is posessed, mission accomplished.

    It is FAR easier to teach a dog NOT to do something before he's had an opportunity to ever get away with it, which is why I set my dogs up - I want to make sure I'm there when the "opportunity" presents itself. It's far more difficult for a dog to UNLEARN a behavior, but it can be done. It takes vigilance, consistancy, and tons of patience - and it will take longer.

    Hope this helps.

    Sue

  25. #25
    Senior Member tweetee's Avatar
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    Wow Sue, Im impressed! You really know your stuff! Thankyou so so much for all of your information, it was a fascinating read, and Ill be sure to try out what you have suggested. You have done a great job at explaining clearly what my dog needs. He knows the word NO, as this I used whe he was a pup, and I used to clap really loudly at the same time, so I think its back to basics, and see what I can do. I will disinfect the area first to get rid of the scent, and go from there.

    Thanks again for your great advice

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