Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34

Thread: How long do home canned vegetables last?

  1. #1
    Super Member donnaree59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,430

    How long do home canned vegetables last?

    I have shared home canned green beans with an elderly couple over the years. We are now going through their things and have found a few jars I'd canned as far back as 2006. She didn't cook the old ones first, just ate the first ones she found. Are the old ones still good? The seals on the jars are still intact and I know they were processed correctly. What you you all think? I wasn't able to get any beans this year, so if they are good, WE'll enjoy them!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    in my stash mostly
    Posts
    887
    Should be ok, I had some that my father gave me and they lasted forever it seemed. Smell and taste when you open them, you will be able to tell if they are still good; but they should be.

    delma

  3. #3
    Super Member donnaree59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,430
    It says online that store bought canned vegetables last 2-5 years beyond expiration date. Just wasn't sure about home canned ones.

  4. #4
    Cyn
    Cyn is offline
    Super Member Cyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville NC
    Posts
    6,761
    Blog Entries
    17
    I agree with looks, smell and then taste to determine if they are still good That's what I would do anyway.

  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,729
    Mom used to can, something different each year. I remember we would eat (for example) Peaches for several years even though she only canned them one year. Ditto for other stuff.

    We kept our canned stock in the "fruit cellar" which was a sub-basement in the house. Always dark (no windows), always cool.

    I would say as long as they were kept in a dark cool place and the seals are intact you should be OK!!
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,020
    why would you taste them if there was a possibility they are bad? Doesn't take very much botulism to make you very sick.
    I agree with "smell", then cook to boiling.

  7. #7
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,204
    When in doubt, throw it out. Save the jars and can something else. A trip to the doctor (or worse) is much more expensive than some iffy vegetables.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  8. #8
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30,790
    When in doubt, throw it out! I opened a new jar of store bought Primo spaghetti sauce that didn't pop when opened it, I threw it out. It is just not worth it for a couple of dollars.

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    20,099
    back to 2006 - I would probably use them if they looked and smelled okay - and the lids had no rust on them and the seal was still good.

  10. #10
    Super Member donnaree59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,430
    Ok thank y'all. I am too afraid to taste them, but I will smell them. I know not to use if seal is broken or if it's rusty. I always boil my canned things at least 10 minutes before we eat them.... I KNEW people on here would know what to do. Thank all of you!

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Kentucky - Live in Iowa
    Posts
    1,161
    I agree with bearisgray. If they look good - no rust - smell okay - enjoy.!

    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    back to 2006 - I would probably use them if they looked and smelled okay - and the lids had no rust on them and the seal was still good.
    Aronel aka Lee

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ashtabula County, Ohio
    Posts
    361
    The only thing with Home Canned Veggies would be a loss of Taste and color fading.. If the Seal is sealed good and there are NO BUBBLES in the top of the Jar then they should still be good to eat... If when opening they smell sour or really off Colored then dump them and save the jar... My husbands grandmother used to can Corn, when opened they about shot the lid up in the air ---they were fermenting and Sour smelling YUCK...
    Friend who can share your laughter and tears are the only ones you need.

  13. #13
    Super Member ranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Posts
    3,313
    Blog Entries
    9
    My DGM used to can veggies and fruit and berries. No pressure cooker so she'd seal the top with melted paraffin. Sometimes when they were opened and the wax removed, there would be some mold on the top. She would just scrape it off and boil the contents. We survived but today I would never do that. If I see any sign of tainting I chuck it.
    ranger
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Life...you muddle your way through it and then you die!

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,152
    Blog Entries
    1
    2006. That's 7 years ago. Honestly, I would throw them out. A trip to the doctor or hospital isn't a risk I would want to take. But that's me.

  15. #15
    Super Member donnaree59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,430
    I just went and looked at the jars again. They look fine, but there is some rust on the tops of some of the lids. I think I'm throwing them out. I would probably never can again if anyone got sick! I'll save the jars and hopefully I can get some this fall to can since I missed the ones this spring. Thanks for all your help

  16. #16
    BCM
    BCM is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    578
    I suggest checking with your local county Home Extension Agency. They should have information and data to answer any questions.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    south oregon coast
    Posts
    103
    if you didn't have trouble with yours, they should be ok. just a tip though, botulism problems are not detected by smell or tasting.... if the jars are ok and the seals are good they should be ok.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Oak Point TX
    Posts
    632
    This I found on info search; "They can be kept 5 years if in a cool dark place."

  19. #19
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Only the Shadow Knows........
    Posts
    972
    Blog Entries
    3
    Shoot, we are still using up the supplies my Gmom had in the basement a decade ago. As long as there isn't any funky stuff on the jars and they smell fine, eat them! If there is any black stuff growing on the outside, that tends to be Botulism and you should NOT open the jar. Wrap in it up and toss it in the trash so it can be buried in the landfill. If you live out in the boonies like me, you bury it in the ground some place safe.

  20. #20
    Senior Member cdmmiracles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    390
    hahaha I have the green bean story of the century......my renter found some canned green beans down in the basement (several jars), he ate them and then told me about finding them.......said they tasted like they were right out of the garden. I haven't canned since my son was 5 yrs old, he's getting ready to turn.......wait for it.......27yrs old in 10 days. That was last year and the renter is still living, lol.

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    31
    I have taken the Extension course on Home Preservation, I also judge 4-H and Open class food preservation. The general recommendation is to use up everything home preserved is within one year. I have used things that have been more than one year.

    Anything that is pressure canned as green beans are, you have the risk of botulism. Botulism can be deadly. NEVER taste when you are checking to make sure home canned beans are safe. Check the seals, rust, smell and then if you are still concerned, start boiling them, if they are bad you will be able to tell very quickly from the smell.

    People will tell you they open canned (not recommended), used paraffin (not recommended) or took other short cuts and they survived. They were lucky, not everyone is.

    The bottom line is do you want to risk your health and your families health by using something that is 6 years old?

    Use the adage: if in doubt, throw it out.

    PB from MN
    who is very picky about canning and food safety

  22. #22
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,204
    I am so glad to hear this. Eating 7 year old green beans makes no sense to me. Good luck with your fall harvest.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  23. #23
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    They are probably fine, however I am not sure I would take the chance.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    359
    I called my county extension office a few years ago about this and they said the canned veges you buy have been in the storhouses years before they are put on the shelf in stores and as long as my home canned goods were processed right and the seal wasn't broken or the contents cloudy they would be good. There is something about boiling them a certain length of time but I don't do that.
    Lynda

  25. #25
    Senior Member ctipton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    fruitland id.
    Posts
    544
    Lots of good advice all around .I would go for it since you canned them.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.