Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Need Advice on Wool Felt

  1. #1
    Suz
    Suz is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,482

    Need Advice on Wool Felt

    I cannot afford the 100% felted wool, but need advice on the wool blends. What percentages do you suggest? Wool/poly, wool/rayon?? I do not like the look of the flat look of the poly(?) that JoAnn's offers. Some of the penny rugs, etc are so interesting and thought I'd like to try my hand. There are so many great illustration on Pinterest.

    Any suggestions appreciated. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    8,965
    How about getting some wool clothing from the thrift stores and felting them yourself. This is what I plan on doing with the clothing I've collected, hope to get to getting some felted sometime this winter.

  3. #3
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,358
    I agree with pocoellie, or maybe save up and buy a little at a time....try ebay as sometimes people sells offcuts, or bits and pieces they don't need. I live in Australia and I recently bought a bundle of 100% merino wool felt from "Two Blue Birdies" in lovely summer colours (7 different colours) for $20.00 plus 3.00 postage they measure 22.5 x 25 cm (that's about 8.85 inches x 9.84 inches). Wool is definitely superior and if your going to spend time making something special, use the best available. Also if it's a toy or something for children the dyes in the wool are very safe and colourfast, something to think about as the acrylic/blends are not always so.

    Felting thrift store finds is fun.....I have done it a few times and it has been quite successful. You could even try dyeing it (I have been meaning to try it, but have no time just now hence my purchase of the bundle of colours).

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    york county, PA
    Posts
    942
    My sister hooks wool rugs and buys a lot of wool clothing at Thrift stores. Some shops have senior citizen discount days or 50% off days, and then she really stocks up! Brings it home and washes it all up. By the way, she has a great button collection!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Lena1952's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    305
    A small kit using 100% felted wool should be affordable, or they are at the shop where I work. This way you are only paying for the wools used in the kit. As a wool dyer, both for myself and the shop mentioned, I completely understand your feelings about the wool felt. It's just not the same in looks or feel when using. Try a kit to see if you like working with wools. If you do, then just remember: you are worth a little extra to make yourself happy. Enjoy!!

  6. #6
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,358
    This thread has me itching to try penny rugs....got a book from the library, such beautiful patterns, and some great ideas.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    326
    What exactly is the process for felting wool?

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    8,965
    OldHairTwister: here's a couple processes:

    Next, fill the washing machine with HOT water, agitate on the longest cycle (I do not use detergent, it doesn’t rinse out very well), rinse in cold water and dry in the dryer under regular heat. Remove from dryer right away and use.
    The wool will be machine washed to felt it. First, sort out colors that you suspect will bleed (red is notorious!) and wash them separately.

    *The longer you agitate the wool in hot water, the tighter the weave will get. If you have a piece of wool that didn’t felt well, run it through another complete cycle. Wool that is partially synthetic, will not felt well. The synthetic is added to keep it from shrinking so avoid words like nylon, 80/20, 10% other fibers, synthetic, or any word that makes you think it has other fibers in it than pure wool.
    Choose garments that are 100% wool or blends of 80% wool and 20% nylon or polyester. Avoid worsted wools; they tend to ravel, even when felted. (You can recognize worsted wool because it feels hard and flat. It is used most often for suits.) Also stay away from loosely woven wool fabric because it may not shrink up in the washing and drying process.

    You may want to wash your wool at the laundromat; otherwise, skim the loose fibers off the surface several times during each load so the drain doesn't clog. Wash on your longest and hottest cycle with a cold rinse and mild detergent.

    Drying the wool in your home dryer is fine if you clean the filter several times during the cycle. Dry on your longest and hottest drying cycle. Take the wool pieces out as soon as they are dry and fold immediately to avoid wrinkles.
    My Mom always talked about ‘boiled wool’ Here’s how I do it
    • Sort the wool fabrics you want to felt by color, just like you would when washing clothes. Match the size of the pan to the amount of wool. A word of caution……….some colors of some wool fabric do bleed color like other fabrics. Adding a Color Catcher sheet won’t work with this process so sort your colors accordingly.
    • Put your wool pieces in the pot and fill it with enough warm/hot tap water to cover the wool. Place it on the stove and crank up the heat. You don’t want the flames whipping up around the pan but set it like you would to bring water to a boil

    • When the water comes to a rapid boil, reduce the temperature a bit but keep the water boiling. Continue to boil for about 7 minutes, stirring a couple of times. While you’re waiting, fill one side of your sink with cold water.
    • After 7 minutes of boiling, remove the wool from the pot and place it in your sink of cold water. You can use a sturdy pair of tongs to grab the wool. I got out one of my big mixing bowls and pulled with wool from the pot, into the bowl and then over to my sink.
    • Squeeze the cold water out of your wool pieces and dry in the dryer on high heat until completely dry. You might want to check the lint trap once during the drying cycle to remove excess lint.
    • Nice tight felted wool ready to use. You can also use this method to felt old wool clothing or sweaters you sometimes find in thrift stores too. Just remember to remove zippers, buttons, etc.
    How do you know your wool is felted properly? Answer: you will be able to cut it and no unravelling or running will occur. You may have to wash and dry 2-5 times to achieve your desired degree of felting.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    new york state
    Posts
    5,566
    Blog Entries
    2
    Here is an article I just ran accross
    http://www.marcusfabrics.com/cgi-bin...?patternID=198
    I also like working with wool but find it pricy
    Kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the blind see.
    mark Twain

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    326
    Thank you pocoellie and zennia I am going to give this a try because I love the mittens that I have seen made out of felted wool.

  11. #11
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,872
    Wool has always been expensive. I remember my mom paying $15/yard back in the 1970's. My mom was not happy! I entered a patchwork granny skirt in the Make It With Wool contest. I wish that I had kept that skirt! Ah, the things we pitch! No ribbons for me, btw. I was very rushed to get it done.

    Look for "In The Patch Designs" felted wool charms and curlers, etc. They are beautiful and affordable. Found in independent quilt shops.

    Sandy
    Last edited by Sandygirl; 01-08-2015 at 04:22 AM.
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    326
    I too can remember it being $15-$18 a yard. But it was quite wide....I am thinking 54"

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    281
    Quote Originally Posted by OldHairTwister View Post
    Thank you pocoellie and zennia I am going to give this a try because I love the mittens that I have seen made out of felted wool.
    I've made mittens and most are made from wool sweaters that have been felted. Wool sweaters are what I use. They are so warm!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.