Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 45

Thread: New Cat

  1. #1
    Member softpatches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Olive Branch, MS
    Posts
    92
    Since most quilters are animal lovers I though maybe you guys could help me-- I just inherited an outdoor longggg hair cat---She is a knotted mess and very nervous. She will barely let me touch her. I need suggestions on getting the knotted hair out so I can keep her brushed--help pls

  2. #2
    Senior Member MissSandra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Melrose N.Y. Troy Area
    Posts
    899
    Blog Entries
    1
    i took my cat to the vet and when they had him sedated they worked on his hair. hes a wild thing.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Merced, CA
    Posts
    4,230
    Blog Entries
    1
    Not right away. Taming an outdoor cat takes time, and if she is really feral, then you'll have a long time job on your hands.
    I have a long haired rescue cat, and she flat out refuses to let me brush her. She stares at the other one while I'm brushing him, he absolutely loves his blue people brush. So I'm taking it one step at a time, I rub her back with a glove on, that gets a lot of the hair.

    As for the matted hair, I'd suggest you get her used to petting, and hold a tiny pair of scissors in one hand while petting her with the other, with maybe a treat to get her attention away from the other hand. Then clip a tiny bit at a time when she's used to you tugging at her hair.

    Like I said, this'll take a lot of time, but well worth it when you get a loving cat out of this scared one. It's good of you to even try, sounds like this poor thing has been abused in her tough life.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Merced, CA
    Posts
    4,230
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by MissSandra
    i took my cat to the vet and when they had him sedated they worked on his hair. hes a wild thing.
    ----------------------------
    This might be the only way you could do it this month or year.

  5. #5
    Super Member Murphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    8,902
    Blog Entries
    1
    My friend had her cat shaved at the groomer. May look funny at first, but allowed the cat to handle grooming and stay unknotted. Good luck.

  6. #6
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Take her to a vet or groomer. It isn't cheap but well worth your piece of mind , not to mention pieces of skin and hers. It will be a one time expense and you will both be much happier.

  7. #7
    Super Member miss_ticky2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    2,053
    We have one that developed some knotted fur at one time for some reason. We ended up with a trip to the vet and sedation and clipping. She looked funny for a while but you could see that she was totally relieved of all the pulling of the matted fur. She never looked back after that and her fur hasn't knotted again since.

  8. #8
    Super Member Kimkankwilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Saugus, CA
    Posts
    1,307
    cornstarch...rub some in, brush it out.

  9. #9
    Cyn
    Cyn is offline
    Super Member Cyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville NC
    Posts
    6,761
    Blog Entries
    17
    I agree! I take my Persian to a groomer every 8 weeks. He isn't shaved but washed and combed. He just lays on his back in the middle of all these dogs and relaxes. I started him out at 6 months tho. He's very tame. It'd be worth a vet trip to have it done!
    Quote Originally Posted by damaquilts
    Take her to a vet or groomer. It isn't cheap but well worth your piece of mind , not to mention pieces of skin and hers. It will be a one time expense and you will both be much happier.

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,199
    I managed to capture my feral barn cat (now my dear friend) with food. I placed a cage on the porch near where I fed her for several days. Then I began to move the food dish closer to the cage. Finally I put the dish right at the door a couple of times; ended by placing the dish just inside the cage.. After I'd done that a few times, I moved further to the back of the cage and quickly shut the cage door on her and went straight to the vet for spaying and rabies shot.

    I thought for sure she'd never 'speak' to me again after I brought her home, but within a day or so we were back to normal and the cage was back in storage.

    Jan in VA

  11. #11
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,723
    We also adopted a yard cat...or she adopted us...That would be my picture of our "Big". She kept her distance but one day made up her mind and came to us...She loves to be brushed, she gets a bath once a mth and is the best ever cat...I feel the best cats are the ones that chose you.

  12. #12
    Super Member cherrio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Ohio, the land of 4 seasons. sometimes all in the same week!
    Posts
    2,509
    knotted hair pulls at the animals skin. a vet and some groomers can sedate and shave/trim the worst mats if kitty is really bad/matted

  13. #13
    Senior Member craftyone27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    958
    Blog Entries
    2
    You will probably need to take her in to be groomed.My mom had a LH indoor cat that would get all matted and the vet would shave her and then it would all grow back lovely. The vet told my mom that once a cat gets a matt or two in their coat they stop grooming themselves and their coat gets progressively worse. Good luck with your new furry friend!

  14. #14
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    So. Central MO
    Posts
    2,636
    Blog Entries
    1
    The only way that I could cut off the knots on my Persian/Himalyian was to snip one snip at a time with a very sharp pair of cuticle sissors. One snip and he would be gone - and he was quite a friendly guy - don't know how you could do it with a wild sort of cat. But after days of getting after him and snipping every chance that I could - with the help of others in the house petting him, etc. we would get off some of the very biggest knots.

  15. #15
    Senior Member sarahconner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    working on a scrappy UFO behind my Viking
    Posts
    809
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have a 10 yr old long haired cat, that is part Maine Coon. I take her to the groomer, about every 7 wks and they shave underneath her. I have seen cats, that are totally shaved for the summer. That would take care of your new cat and her messed up hair. Am not sure how U would get her in a cage to get her to a groomer.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by MissSandra
    i took my cat to the vet and when they had him sedated they worked on his hair. hes a wild thing.
    This is your best bet, when they are matted like that it can be very painful to try and brush that out, your vet can sedate and shave the cats matts off

  17. #17
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramona Byrd
    Not right away. Taming an outdoor cat takes time, and if she is really feral, then you'll have a long time job on your hands.
    I have a long haired rescue cat, and she flat out refuses to let me brush her. She stares at the other one while I'm brushing him, he absolutely loves his blue people brush. So I'm taking it one step at a time, I rub her back with a glove on, that gets a lot of the hair.

    As for the matted hair, I'd suggest you get her used to petting, and hold a tiny pair of scissors in one hand while petting her with the other, with maybe a treat to get her attention away from the other hand. Then clip a tiny bit at a time when she's used to you tugging at her hair.

    Like I said, this'll take a lot of time, but well worth it when you get a loving cat out of this scared one. It's good of you to even try, sounds like this poor thing has been abused in her tough life.
    You should never ever clip a cat this way, you can clip huge portions of the skin off, scissors are a no no with cats, i have seen some nasty cuts from people doing this when i worked at a vet, always use clippers, cats usually don't like them which is why you need the sedation

  18. #18
    Member softpatches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Olive Branch, MS
    Posts
    92
    Thanks for all your input--Let me clarify--she is not wild or feral just always been outside in the country and very nervous. After the sun goes down she will come and sit at the back door and when I go out she will run away but if I sit down she will come back and let me pet her, no picking up.
    The matts I know are painful as they are under her hair and very close to the skin. Her little tummy is a mess, of course her most tender part. She has been fixed and stays iin the carport (in her hiddy hole) until dark and then comes out to visit. She is really pretty and sweet, abt 7 yrs old and will make a great quilt buddy if I go slowwww- I know I will probably have to take her and have a pro take care of the matts but I don't want to scare her more. Need to do something soon as it is sooooo hot here in MS and humid. She rolled over on her back tonite and let me rub her tummy for a minute, big move for her. I thought abt getting some baby oil and rubbing her tummy with it. What do you think????I'll try and get a pic of her soon and show a before and after, :)

  19. #19
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,285
    Definitely take her to the vet, she probably could do with a check up and she will definitely need a light sedation and be shaved. Baby oil will make a terrible mess and it's not too good to have her licking it, or trying too. She is too shy and scared for a groomer to tackle the job, and if the mats are bad, she could well have some ulceration you can't see. Cats have extraordinarily fine skin, much finer than ours, and it doesn't take much to cause a lesion or tear it.

    Don't forget to put her in a suitable container, if you dont have a cat carrier use two laundry baskets tied together...or use a wicker laundry basket with the lid attached, don't forget plenty of paper/old towels in the bottom...sometimes the timid ones get scared and pee.

    Good luck with your cat taming/beautification...would love to see pics. Oh, I forgot...while she's being groomed get yourself a good grooming tool, so you can keep on top of it....Furminator is good, but ask your vet to recommend the right one for her type.

  20. #20
    Janebird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    82
    We had to do this with a cat that wandered into our lives. He needed sedation before it could be done, but the mats were so tight to his skin that the vet said it probably hurt him when we petted him. He was much more receptive to attention when the mats were gone. He had such long fur that it needed to be done each year.

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy
    My friend had her cat shaved at the groomer. May look funny at first, but allowed the cat to handle grooming and stay unknotted. Good luck.

  21. #21
    Super Member adrianlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by miss_ticky2
    We have one that developed some knotted fur at one time for some reason. We ended up with a trip to the vet and sedation and clipping. She looked funny for a while but you could see that she was totally relieved of all the pulling of the matted fur. She never looked back after that and her fur hasn't knotted again since.
    I agree. Trip to the vet, they can sedate her and get her all clipped up and checked out. She should be able to take care of her coat after that.

  22. #22
    Super Member adrianlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by miss_ticky2
    We have one that developed some knotted fur at one time for some reason. We ended up with a trip to the vet and sedation and clipping. She looked funny for a while but you could see that she was totally relieved of all the pulling of the matted fur. She never looked back after that and her fur hasn't knotted again since.
    I agree. Trip to the vet, they can sedate her and get her all clipped up and checked out. She should be able to take care of her coat after that.

  23. #23
    llcathey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    451
    Blog Entries
    1
    if you have a Vet get something from him to calm her down so you can get her in a carrier than have the Vet sedate and trim her up the only way to do it
    Iv taken in so many strays before we sold the house and this is the way I could get them to the Vet to be checked out and cleaned up

  24. #24
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    37,633
    Blog Entries
    1
    i had a maine coone, every june he'd get a lion cut it was soo cute and cool for him

  25. #25
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    El Sobrante, CA
    Posts
    2,114
    Please take her to a groomer and have her shaved. I have Persians and they need to be shaved once in awhile. The cat will hate you if you keep trying to comb her hair, cause it hurts her skin. I live in California and it costs about $40.00. I love my kitties, they sit and watch me sew and craft. Callie is a calico. Silverado (Roddy) was a show cat and is a silver blue pathed tabby.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.