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Thread: Open for suggestions: How to temporarly attach super thin binding to fabric?

  1. #1
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    More questions relating to my stained glass quilting project.

    Most of the things I read on the bias tape method of stained glass quilting says to use some sort of fusible to temporary attach the binding to the fabric until you sew it down. The problem is most of those instructions are for like 3/8" bias tape. The majority of my bias is either 1/8" or 3/16" and they don't make fusible bias tape that small. Or at least not that I'm aware of (and I looked).

    I did a little bit of experimentation. I bought some 3/8" fusible tape (Heat n Bond), cut off 1/8" from it, cut a strip of fabric to 1/8", followed the instructions on attaching the tape to the fabric, and ironed the strip to another piece of fabric. And it actually worked. But I'd have to custom cut all my tape and it bonded to the fabric a little bit too well which would make it difficult to reposition. I really had to tug on it good to get that little strip off.

    So here I am looking for suggestions on how to attach the super thin bias tape before stitching it down.

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    glue?

  3. #3
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    Try Lite Steam-a-Seam 2. It is repositionable. It's tacky, so it will hold to the fabric until you can press it. Once pressed, it's like any other fusible.

  4. #4
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
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    you might want to try elmers glue to temp hold down the bias instead of messing with any fusible.

    once the glue is heat set it holds really well and washes out after its sewn down.

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you can purchase fusable on a roll (like tape) that is 1/4" and 1/8" wide...it is what is used on the black bias for stained glass. it is not expensive= and is used with a bias tape maker to attach it to your leading.
    it is available from clotilde's and nancy's notions. it is on the page with the clover fusable bias tapes.
    i bought the roll of 1/4" i have now at joannes- it was very inexpensive....compared to the ready made fusable bias tapes.

  6. #6
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    Glue!

  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    You can tack fuse almost any fusible web by just tapping it with the tip of your iron for a second or two every few inches instead of pressing it down for the full time instructed.

  8. #8
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_V_Goddess
    I did a little bit of experimentation. I bought some 3/8" fusible tape (Heat n Bond), cut off 1/8" from it, cut a strip of fabric to 1/8", followed the instructions on attaching the tape to the fabric, and ironed the strip to another piece of fabric. And it actually worked. But I'd have to custom cut all my tape and it bonded to the fabric a little bit too well which would make it difficult to reposition. I really had to tug on it good to get that little strip off.
    I think I'm missing something.

    Are you using just a piece of black fabric for the stained glass effect, or are you actually making bias binding from fabric (thinner, but like you can buy on the rolls)?

    If it's just the single piece black fabric, wouldn't it be easier to attach the fusible (whatever width you bought) to the large piece of fabric and THEN cut the 1/8" strips?
    I'd even do it with a Steam-A-Seam lite sheet - and a larger piece of black(?) fabric, and then carve off the 1/8" cuts that are needed.

    Like I said, I think I'm missing something.
    Wouldn't be the first time. ;-);-)

  9. #9
    Super Member greenini's Avatar
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    Also what about spray fusing like I think it's maybe called 505? You'd probably have to spray it on a newspaper, but could most likely just lay all your strips out upside down, spritz and then set them out on the quilt top. I've never tried it, but just a thought, good luck.

  10. #10
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    There is a not so new product called Hot Ribbon - it is thin ribbon with the fusible already on it. I have it in a kit but haven't tried working with it yet. It is supposed to hold your raw edges down so it should work for your project!

  11. #11
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    what about glue stick? less messy than spray glue or elmers -

  12. #12
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    Try Roxanne's Glue-Baste-It - temporary basting glue. Once I tried this I have never needed any other product, especially for bias strips of any size. Perfect for stained glass.

  13. #13
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Okay. Not entirely sure why this is in General Chit Chat because it relates to quilting. But anyways...

    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_V_Goddess
    I did a little bit of experimentation. I bought some 3/8" fusible tape (Heat n Bond), cut off 1/8" from it, cut a strip of fabric to 1/8", followed the instructions on attaching the tape to the fabric, and ironed the strip to another piece of fabric. And it actually worked. But I'd have to custom cut all my tape and it bonded to the fabric a little bit too well which would make it difficult to reposition. I really had to tug on it good to get that little strip off.
    I think I'm missing something.

    Are you using just a piece of black fabric for the stained glass effect, or are you actually making bias binding from fabric (thinner, but like you can buy on the rolls)?

    If it's just the single piece black fabric, wouldn't it be easier to attach the fusible (whatever width you bought) to the large piece of fabric and THEN cut the 1/8" strips?
    I'd even do it with a Steam-A-Seam lite sheet - and a larger piece of black(?) fabric, and then carve off the 1/8" cuts that are needed.

    Like I said, I think I'm missing something.
    Wouldn't be the first time. ;-);-)
    The method I'm using: I'll have a white piece of fabric that my design is on, put down the colored pieces (the "glass"), and then put pieces of bias tape (the "leading") in between the colored pieces.

    Quote Originally Posted by Polliwog
    Try Roxanne's Glue-Baste-It - temporary basting glue. Once I tried this I have never needed any other product, especially for bias strips of any size. Perfect for stained glass.
    Where can I find it?

  14. #14
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I saw the suggestion somewhere to use Elmer's School Glue for basting a binding in place, and I imagine it would be good for your purpose also. The person ironed it immediately to set it. It will wash out and not permanently alter the texture of the fabric. Probably you would want to experiment with it before using it on your quilt. It's on my list of things to try sometime.

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    Elmer's school glue is one of my favorites and you DON"T need a special tip. Just open the tip a little and squeeze out dots. Heat set with iron and it's good to go.

  16. #16
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
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    Rather than custom cutting really thin strips of fusible web, how about this glue. By the way, it is water soluble.

    Roxanne's Glue Baste-It

    http://www.jankrentz.com/displaypage.php?ID=35

  17. #17
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_V_Goddess
    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    If it's just the single piece black fabric, wouldn't it be easier to attach the fusible (whatever width you bought) to the large piece of fabric and THEN cut the 1/8" strips?
    I'd even do it with a Steam-A-Seam lite sheet - and a larger piece of black(?) fabric, and then carve off the 1/8" cuts that are needed.
    The method I'm using: I'll have a white piece of fabric that my design is on, put down the colored pieces (the "glass"), and then put pieces of bias tape (the "leading") in between the colored pieces.
    And that method would work SO much easier in the way that MTS described. Fuse the web to the black BEFORE you cut it to the thickness you want for your lead. Don't know why you'd have to move the leading around any, but tack fusing moves easily and then press when you're ready. Easy as pie. It's dry, it stays put, it's neat. Any other adhesive is going to leave fuzzy edges and glop, especially with the huge amount of leading in this project and the narrow width you have chosen to work with. My

  18. #18
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    Glue-Baste-It is available in the several quilt shops in my area NW of downtown Atlanta. You might also check at Michael's and Joann's. Send me a PM if you can't find it locally - or perhaps online.

  19. #19
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    elmers works great. i did get the little tip, just don't loose the little wire to clean out the little tip.

  20. #20
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I am a big fan of Elmers School Glue & have used it with great results. It costs about $1 a bottle- best quilting bargain I've had in awhile! Use it with a dry hot iron- just little dots.

  21. #21
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I bought a roll of silvery gray bias tape with the adhesive all ready on it from Quilt in a Day. I laid my block out on a pressing board and stuck straight pins down through the binding--arranging & re-arranging until I had everything where it wanted it. Then I pulled out a few pins and hit that section with my Clover mini-iron. I just kept removing pins and using the mini-iron until I had it all fused. Then I used a very small machine applique stitch all around the binding.

    I have also seen paper pieced patterns that have the "leading" built into the pattern so no bias binding is used--just a little sliver of black/gray/bronze fabric before adding each piece.

    Stained Glass block
    Name:  Attachment-202497.jpe
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  22. #22
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    USE ELMERS it's the best bargin you can buy. dab it on - heat set with iron - washes out. and i bet you can get it somewhere near you right now.

  23. #23
    Super Member Kappy's Avatar
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    Sharon Schamber (I think that's how you spell her name) uses Elmers School Glue and has a fine tip applicator, she uses it when doing her binding. I tried the glue on my last binding and it held that very well, although I did not invest in the fine tip applicator and wound up smearing some around with a tooth pick, but it did work! I think the fine tip applicator would be best for yur narrow tape. Can't wait to see the finished project!

  24. #24
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_V_Goddess
    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    If it's just the single piece black fabric, wouldn't it be easier to attach the fusible (whatever width you bought) to the large piece of fabric and THEN cut the 1/8" strips?
    I'd even do it with a Steam-A-Seam lite sheet - and a larger piece of black(?) fabric, and then carve off the 1/8" cuts that are needed.
    The method I'm using: I'll have a white piece of fabric that my design is on, put down the colored pieces (the "glass"), and then put pieces of bias tape (the "leading") in between the colored pieces.
    And that method would work SO much easier in the way that MTS described. Fuse the web to the black BEFORE you cut it to the thickness you want for your lead. Don't know why you'd have to move the leading around any, but tack fusing moves easily and then press when you're ready. Easy as pie. It's dry, it stays put, it's neat. Any other adhesive is going to leave fuzzy edges and glop, especially with the huge amount of leading in this project and the narrow width you have chosen to work with. My
    I'm not entirely sure if I get the method both of you are trying to relay to me. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like you're trying to tell me to cut the strip to whatever width I need for the leading and leave the edges raw. Or having one piece of black fabric the size of my wallhanging and cutting out all the glass parts so I'd have this one solid piece that's just black linework (as shown in this YouTube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQZHVPGL9Xg). In either case both methods leave raw edges and I don't want raw edges. With the leading being so thin I would think it wouldn't be hard for the fraying to really take its toll and completely wear out my linework. Even more so knowing me...I'm not exactly the most delicate with my projects even when I try.

  25. #25
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kappy
    Sharon Schamber (I think that's how you spell her name) uses Elmers School Glue and has a fine tip applicator, she uses it when doing her binding. I tried the glue on my last binding and it held that very well, although I did not invest in the fine tip applicator and wound up smearing some around with a tooth pick, but it did work! I think the fine tip applicator would be best for yur narrow tape. Can't wait to see the finished project!
    Totally forgot that I've seen that method on a video before. Think I forgot because...I don't know...something about that woman urks me. When I watched her videos I sort of felt this "I'm a high prize winning quilter and a reeeeeeeal know-it-all so you must suck horribly if you use any method other than what I am showing to you on my videos" vibe. Maybe its just me.

    But after reading all the comments on here about using Elmer's Glue it actually doesn't sound like a bad idea. But do I really want to pay $5 for a fine tip glue applicator I'll probably only use for this project?

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